Antibody effective in cure for rare blood disorders

3D illustration of an antibody binding to a designated target.
Illustration created by Audra Geras.

A variety of diseases can be traced to a simple root cause: problems in the bone marrow. The bone marrow contains specialized stem cells known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that give rise to different types of blood cells. As mentioned in a previous blog about Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), one problem that can occur is the production of “sickle like” red blood cells. In blood cancers like leukemia, there is an uncontrollable production of abnormal white blood cells. Another condition, known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), are a group of cancers in which immature blood cells in the bone marrow do not mature and therefore do not become healthy blood cells.

For diseases that originate in the bone marrow, one treatment involves introducing healthy HSCs from a donor or gene therapy. However, before this type of treatment can take place, all of the problematic HSCs must be eliminated from the patient’s body. This process, known as pre-treatment, involves a combination of chemotherapy and radiation, which can be extremely toxic and life threatening. There are some patients whose condition has progressed to the point where their bodies are not strong enough to withstand pre-treatment. Additionally, there are long-term side effects that chemotherapy and radiation can have on infant children that are discussed in a previous blog about pediatric brain cancer.

Could there be a targeted, non-toxic approach to eliminating unwanted HSCs that can be used in combination with stem cell therapies? Researchers at Stanford say yes and have very promising results to back up their claim.

Dr. Judith Shizuru and her team at Stanford University have developed an antibody that can eliminate problematic blood forming stem cells safely and efficiently. The antibody is able to identify a protein on HSCs and bind to it. Once it is bound, the protein is unable to function, effectively removing the problematic blood forming stem cells.

Dr. Shizuru is the senior author of a study published online on February 11th, 2019 in Blood that was conducted in mice and focused on MDS. The results were very promising, demonstrating that the antibody successfully depleted human MDS cells and aided transplantation of normal human HSCs in the MDS mouse model.

This proof of concept holds promise for MDS as well as other disease conditions. In a public release from Stanford Medicine, Dr. Shizuru is quoted as saying, “A treatment that specifically targets only blood-forming stem cells would allow us to potentially cure people with diseases as varied as sickle cell disease, thalassemia, autoimmune disorders and other blood disorders…We are very hopeful that this body of research is going to have a positive impact on patients by allowing better depletion of diseased cells and engraftment of healthy cells.”

The research mentioned was partially funded by us at CIRM. Additionally, we recently awarded a $3.7 million dollar grant to use the same antibody in a human clinical trial for the so-called “bubble baby disease”, which is also known as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). You can read more about that award on a previous blog post linked here.

Mechanical forces are the key to speedy recovery after blood cancer treatment

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Mesenchymal stem cells grown on a surface with specialized mechanical properties. Image courtesy of Krystyn Van Vliet at MIT.

Blood cancers, such as leukemia and lymphoma, are projected to be responsible for 10% of all new cancer diagnoses this year. These types of cancers are often treated by killing the patient’s bone marrow (the site of blood cell manufacturing), with a treatment called irradiation. While effective for ridding the body of cancerous cells, this treatment also kills healthy blood cells. Therefore, for a time after the treatment, patients are particularly vulnerable to infections, because the cellular components of the immune system are down for the count.

Now scientists at MIT have devised a method to make blood cells regenerate faster and  minimize the window for opportunistic infections.

Using multipotent stem cells (stem cells that are able to become multiple cell types) grown on a new and specialized surface that mimics bone marrow, the investigators changed the stem cells into different types of blood cells. When transplanted into mice that had undergone irradiation, they found that the mice recovered much more quickly compared to mice given stem cells grown on a more traditional plastic surface that does not resemble bone marrow as well.

This finding, published in the journal Stem Cell Research and Therapy, is particularly revolutionary, because it is the first time researchers have observed that mechanical properties can affect how the cells differentiate and behave.

The lead author of the study attributes the decreased recovery time to the type of stem cell that was given to mice compared to what humans are normally given after irradiation. Humans are given a stem cell that is only able to become different types of blood cells. The mice in this study, however, were give a stem cell that can become many different types of cells such as muscle, bone and cartilage, suggesting that these cells somehow changed the bone marrow environment to promote a more efficient recovery. They attributed a large part of this phenomenon to a secreted protein call ostepontin, which has previously been describe in activating the cells of the immune system.

In a press release, Dr. Viola Vogel, a scientist not related to study, puts the significance of these findings in a larger context:

“Illustrating how mechanopriming of mesenchymal stem cells can be exploited to improve on hematopoietic recovery is of huge medical significance. It also sheds light onto how to utilize their approach to perhaps take advantage of other cell subpopulations for therapeutic applications in the future.”

Dr. Krystyn Van Vliet, explains the potential to expand these findings beyond the scope of just blood cancer treatment:

“You could imagine that by changing their culture environment, including their mechanical environment, MSCs could be used for administration to target several other diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and others.”

 

Support cells have different roles in blood stem cell maintenance before and after stress

How-Stem-Cells-Act-When-Stressed-Versus-When-At-Rest

Expression of pleiotrophin (green) in bone marrow blood vessels (red) and stromal cells (white) in normal mice (left), and in mice 24 hours after irradiation (right). UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Cell Stem Cell

A new study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, reveals how different types of cells in the bone marrow are responsible for supporting blood stem cell maintenance before and after injury.

It was already well known in the field that two different cell types, namely endothelial cells (which line blood vessels) and stromal cells (which make up connective tissue, or tissue that provides structural support for any organ), are responsible for maintaining the population of blood stem cells in the bone marrow. However, how these cells and the molecules they secrete impact blood stem cell development and maintenance is not well understood.

Hematopoietic stem cells are responsible for generating the multiple different types of cells found in blood, from our oxygen carrying red blood cells to the many different types of white blood cells that make up our immune system.

Dr. John Chute’s group at UCLA had previously discovered that a molecule called pleiotrophin, or PTN, is important for promoting self-renewal of the blood stem cell population. They did not, however, understand which cells secrete this molecule and when.

To answer this question, the scientists developed mouse models that did not produce PTN in different types of bone marrow cells, such as endothelial cells and stromal cells. Surprisingly, they saw that the inability of stromal cells to produce PTN decreased the blood stem cell population, but deletion of PTN in endothelial cells did not affect the blood stem cell niche.

Even more interestingly, the researchers found that in animals that were subjected to an environmental stressor, in this case, radiation, the result was reversed: endothelial cell PTN was necessary for blood stem cell renewal, whereas stromal cell PTN was not. While an important part of the knowledge base for blood stem cell biology, the reason for this switch in PTN secretion at times of homeostasis and disease is still unknown.

As Dr. Chute states in a press release, this result could have important implications for cancer treatments such as radiation:

“It may be possible to administer modified, recombinant versions of pleiotrophin to patients to accelerate blood cell regeneration. This strategy also may apply to patients undergoing bone marrow transplants.”

Another important consideration to take away from this work is that animal models developed in the laboratory should take into account the possibility that blood stem cell maintenance and regeneration is distinctly controlled under healthy and disease state. In other words, cellular function in one state is not always indicative of its role in another state.

This work was partially funded by a CIRM Leadership Award.

 

 

CIRM weekly stem cell roundup: stomach bacteria & cancer; vitamin C may block leukemia; stem cells bring down a 6’2″ 246lb football player

gastric

This is what your stomach glands looks like from the inside:  Credit: MPI for Infection Biology”

Stomach bacteria crank up stem cell renewal, may be link to gastric cancer (Todd Dubnicoff)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that two-thirds of the world’s population is infected with H. pylori, a type of bacteria that thrives in the harsh acidic conditions of the stomach. Data accumulated over the past few decades shows strong evidence that H. pylori infection increases the risk of stomach cancers. The underlying mechanisms of this link have remained unclear. But research published this week in Nature suggests that the bacteria cause stem cells located in the stomach lining to divide more frequently leading to an increased potential for cancerous growth.

Tumors need to make an initial foothold in a tissue in order to grow and spread. But the cells of our stomach lining are replaced every four days. So, how would H. pylori bacterial infection have time to induce a cancer? The research team – a collaboration between scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Berlin and Stanford University – asked that question and found that the bacteria are also able to penetrate down into the stomach glands and infect stem cells whose job it is to continually replenish the stomach lining.

Further analysis in mice revealed that two groups of stem cells exist in the stomach glands – one slowly dividing and one rapidly dividing population. Both stem cell populations respond similarly to an important signaling protein, called Wnt, that sustains stem cell renewal. But the team also discovered a second key stem cell signaling protein called R-spondin that is released by connective tissue underneath the stomach glands. H. pylori infection of these cells causes an increase in R-spondin which shuts down the slowly dividing stem cell population but cranks up the cell division of the rapidly dividing stem cells. First author, Dr. Michal Sigal, summed up in a press release how these results may point to stem cells as the link between bacterial infection and increased risk of stomach cancer:

“Since H. pylori causes life-long infections, the constant increase in stem cell divisions may be enough to explain the increased risk of carcinogenesis observed.”

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Vitamin C may have anti-blood cancer properties

Vitamin C is known to have a number of health benefits, from preventing scurvy to limiting the buildup of fatty plaque in your arteries. Now a new study says we might soon be able to add another benefit: it may be able to block the progression of leukemia and other blood cancers.

Researchers at the NYU School of Medicine focused their work on an enzyme called TET2. This is found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the kind of stem cell typically found in bone marrow. The absence of TET2 is known to keep these HSCs in a pre-leukemic state; in effect priming the body to develop leukemia. The researchers showed that high doses of vitamin C can prevent, or even reverse that, by increasing the activity level of TET2.

In the study, in the journal Cell, they showed how they developed mice that could have their levels of TET2 increased or decreased. They then transplanted bone marrow with low levels of TET2 from those mice into healthy, normal mice. The healthy mice started to develop leukemia-like symptoms. However, when the researchers used high doses of vitamin C to restore the activity levels of TET2, they were able to halt the progression of the leukemia.

Now this doesn’t mean you should run out and get as much vitamin C as you can to help protect you against leukemia. In an article in The Scientist, Benjamin Neel, senior author of the study, says while vitamin C does have health benefits,  consuming large doses won’t do you much good:

“They’re unlikely to be a general anti-cancer therapy, and they really should be understood based on the molecular understanding of the many actions vitamin C has in cells.”

However, Neel says these findings do give scientists a new tool to help them target cells before they become leukemic.

Jordan reed

Bad toe forces Jordan Reed to take a knee: Photo courtesy FanRag Sports

Toeing the line: how unapproved stem cell treatment made matters worse for an NFL player  

American football players are tough. They have to be to withstand pounding tackles by 300lb men wearing pads and a helmet. But it wasn’t a crunching hit that took Washington Redskins player Jordan Reed out of the game; all it took to put the 6’2” 246 lb player on the PUP (Physically Unable to Perform) list was a little stem cell injection.

Reed has had a lingering injury problem with the big toe on his left foot. So, during the off-season, he thought he would take care of the issue, and got a stem cell injection in the toe. It didn’t quite work the way he hoped.

In an interview with the Richmond Times Dispatch he said:

“That kind of flared it up a bit on me. Now I’m just letting it calm down before I get out there. I’ve just gotta take my time, let it heal and strengthen up, then get back out there.”

It’s not clear what kind of stem cells Reed got, if they were his own or from a donor. What is clear is that he is just the latest in a long line of athletes who have turned to stem cells to help repair or speed up recovery from an injury. These are treatments that have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and that have not been tested in a clinical trial to make sure they are both safe and effective.

In Reed’s case the problem seems to be a relatively minor one; his toe is expected to heal and he should be back in action before too long.

Stem cell researcher and avid blogger Dr. Paul Knoepfler wrote he is lucky, others who take a similar approach may not be:

“Fortunately, it sounds like Reed will be fine, but some people have much worse reactions to unproven stem cells than a sore toe, including blindness and tumors. Be careful out there!”

Engineered bone tissue improves stem cell transplants

Bone marrow transplants are currently the only approved stem cell-based therapy in the United States. They involve replacing the hematopoietic, or blood-forming stem cells, found in the bone marrow with healthy stem cells to treat patients with cancers, immune diseases and blood disorders.

For bone marrow transplants to succeed, patients must undergo radiation therapy to wipe out their diseased bone marrow, which creates space for the donor stem cells to repopulate the blood system. Radiation can lead to complications including hair loss, nausea, fatigue and infertility.

Scientists at UC San Diego have a potential solution that could make current bone marrow transplants safer for patients. Their research, which was funded in part by a CIRM grant, was published yesterday in the journal PNAS.

Engineered bone with functional bone marrow in the center. (Varghese Lab)

Led by bioengineering professor Dr. Shyni Varghese, the team engineered artificial bone tissue that contains healthy donor blood stem cells. They implanted the engineered bone under the skin of normal mice and watched as the “accessory bone marrow” functioned like the real thing by creating new blood cells.

The implant lasted more than six months. During that time, the scientists observed that the cells within the engineered bone structure matured into bone tissue that housed the donor bone marrow stem cells and resembled how bones are structured in the human body. The artificial bones also formed connections with the mouse circulatory system, which allowed the host blood cells to populate the implanted bone tissue and the donor blood cells to expand into the host’s bloodstream.

Normal bone structure (left) and engineered bone (middle) are very similar. Bone tissue shown on top right and bone marrow cells on bottom right. (Varghese lab)

The team also implanted these artificial bones into mice that received radiation to mimic the procedures that patients typically undergo before bone marrow transplants. The engineered bone successfully repopulated the blood systems of the irradiated mice, similar to how blood stem cell functions in normal bone.

In a UC San Diego news release, Dr. Varghese explained how their technology could be translated into the clinic,

“We’ve made an accessory bone that can separately accommodate donor cells. This way, we can keep the host cells and bypass irradiation. We’re working on making this a platform to generate more bone marrow stem cells. That would have useful applications for cell transplantations in the clinic.”

The authors concluded that engineered bone tissue would specifically benefit patients who needed bone marrow transplants for non-cancerous bone marrow-related diseases such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia where there isn’t a need to destroy cancer-causing cells.

A single protein can boost blood stem cell regeneration

Today, CIRM-funded scientists from the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center reported  in Nature Medicine that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) – blood stem cells that generate the cell in your blood and immune system – get a helping hand after injury from cells in the bone marrow called bone progenitor cells. By secreting a protein called dickkopf-1 (Dkk1), bone progenitor cells improve the recovery and survival of blood stem cells in a culture dish and in mice whose immune systems are suppressed by irradiation.

These findings build upon a related study published by the same UCLA team last month showing that deleting a single gene in HSCs boosts blood stem cell regeneration. We covered this initial story previously on the Stem Cellar, and you can refer to it for background on the importance of stimulating the regenerative capacity of HSCs in patients that need bone marrow transplants or have undergone radiation therapy for cancer.

Dkk1 boost blood stem cell regeneration

Senior author on the study, UCLA Professor Dr. John Chute, wanted to understand how the different cell types in the bone marrow environment, or niche, interact with HSCs to enhance their ability to recover from injury and regenerate the immune system. As mentioned earlier, he and his team found that bone progenitor cells secrete Dkk1 protein in response to injury caused by exposing mice to full body irradiation. Dkk1 promoted blood stem cell regeneration in the mice and increased their survival rates.

I inquired with Dr. Chute about this seemingly beneficial relationship between HSCs and cells in the bone marrow niche.

Dr. John Chute, UCLA

Dr. John Chute, UCLA

“The precise functions of bone cells, stromal cells and endothelial cells in regulating blood stem cell fate are not completely understood,” said Dr. Chute. “Our prior studies demonstrated that endothelial cells are necessary for blood stem cell regeneration after irradiation.  The current study suggests that bone progenitor cells are also necessary for normal blood stem cell regeneration after irradiation, and that this activity is mediated by secretion of Dkk1 by the bone progenitor cells.”

He further commented in a UCLA press release:

“The cellular niche is like the soil that surrounds the stem cell ‘seed’ and helps it grow and proliferate. Our hypothesis was that the bone progenitor cell in the niche may promote hematopoietic stem cell regeneration after injury.”

Not only did Dkk1 improve HSC regeneration in irradiated mice, it also boosted the regeneration of HSCs that were irradiated in a culture dish. On the other hand, when Dkk1 was deleted from HSCs in irradiated mice, the HSCs did not recover and regenerate. Diving in deeper, the team found that Dkk1 promotes blood stem cell regeneration by direct action on the stem cells and by indirectly increasing the secretion of the stem cell growth factor EGF by bone marrow blood vessels. Taken together, the team concluded that Dkk1 is necessary for blood stem cell recovery following injury/irradiation.

After radiation, blood cells (purple) regenerated in bone marrow when mice were given DKK1 intravenously (left), but not in those that received saline solution (right). (UCLA/Nature Medicine)

After radiation, blood cells (purple) regenerated in bone marrow when mice were given DKK1 (left), but not in those that received saline solution (right). (UCLA/Nature Medicine)

Future applications for blood stem cell regeneration

When I asked Dr. Chute how his current study on Dkk1 and HSCs relates to his previous study on boosting HSC regeneration by deleting a gene called Grb10, he explained:

“In this paper we discovered the role of a niche cell-derived protein, Dkk1, and how it promotes blood stem cell regeneration after myelosuppression in mice.  In the Cell Reports paper, we described our discovery of an adaptor protein, Grb10, which is expressed by blood stem cells and the inhibition of which also promotes blood stem cell regeneration after myelosuppression. So, these are two novel molecular mechanisms that regulate blood stem cell regeneration that could be therapeutically targeted.”

Both studies offer new strategies for promoting blood stem cell regeneration in patients who need to replenish their blood and immune systems following radiation treatments or bone marrow transplants.

Dr. Chute concluded:

“We are very interested in translating our observations into the clinic for the purpose of accelerating hematologic recovery in patients receiving chemotherapy or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.”


Related Links:

Deleting a single gene can boost blood stem cell regeneration

A serious side effect that cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy experience is myelosuppression. That’s a big word for a process that involves the decreased production of the body’s immune cells from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or blood stem cells in the bone marrow. Without these important cells that make up the immune system, patients are at risk for major infections and even death.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Scientists are trying to find ways to treat cancer patients that have undergone myelosuppressive therapies, as well as patients that need bone marrow transplants to replace their own bone marrow that’s been damaged or removed. One possible solution is boosting the regenerative capacity of HSCs. Transplanting HSCs that are specially primed to reproduce rapidly into cells of the immune system could improve the outcome of bone marrow transplants in patients.

Deleting Grb10 boost blood stem cell regeneration

A CIRM-funded team from the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center and the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has identified a single gene that can be manipulated to boost HSC regeneration in mice. The study, which was published in Cell Reports, found that deleting or turning off expression of an imprinted gene called Grb10 in HSCs caused these blood stem cells to reproduce more robustly after being transplanted into mice that had their bone marrow removed.

I just used another big word in that last paragraph, so let me explain. An imprinted gene is a gene that is expressed or activated based on which parent it was inherited from. Typically, you receive one copy of a gene from your mother and one from your father and both are expressed – a process called Mendelian inheritance. But imprinted genes are different – they are marked with specific epigenetic tags that silence their expression in the sperm or egg cells of the parents. Thus if you inherited an imprinted gene from your mother, the other copy of that gene from your father would be expressed and vice versa.

Scientists have discovered that imprinted genes are important for human development and also for directing what cell types adult stem cells like HSCs develop into. The team from UCLA led by senior author Dr. John Chute, was interested in answering a different question: are imprinted genes involved in determining the function of HSCs? They compared two different populations of HSCs derived from mouse bone marrow: a normal, healthy population and HSCs exposed to total body irradiation (TBI), which destroys the immune system. They discovered that the expression of an imprinted gene called Grb10 was dramatically higher in HSCs exposed to TBI compared to healthy HSCs.

Cell Reports

Deleting Grb10  increases blood stem cell regeneration in the bone marrow of irradiated mice (bottom) compared to normal mice (top). Cell Reports

Because Grb10 is an imprinted gene, the scientists deleted either the paternal or maternal copy of that gene in mice. While deleting the paternal Grb10 gene had no effect on the function of HSCs, maternal deletion dramatically boosted the capacity of HSCs to divide and make more copies of themselves. Without the maternal copy of Grb10, HSCs were able to regenerate at a much faster scale than normal HSCs.

To further prove their point, the team transplanted normal HSCs and HSCs that lacked Grb10 into TBI or fully irradiated mice. HSCs that lacked Grb10 were able to regenerate themselves and produce other immune cells more robustly 20 weeks after transplantation compared to normal HSCs.

Potential applications and future studies

This study offers two important findings. First, they discovered that Grb10 plays an important role “in regulating HSC self-renewal following transplantation and HSC regeneration in response to injury.” Second, they found that inhibiting Grb10 function in HSCs could have potential therapeutic applications for boosting “hematopoietic regeneration in the setting of HSC transplantation or following myelosuppressive injury.” Patients in need of bone marrow transplants could potentially receive more benefit from transplants of HSCs that don’t express the Grb10 gene.

In my opinion, further studies should be done to further understand the role of Grb10 in regulating HSC self-renewal and regeneration. What is the benefit of having this gene expressed in HSCs if inhibiting its expression leads to an increased regenerative capacity? Is it to prevent cancer from forming? Additionally, the authors will need to address the potential long-term side effects of inhibiting Grb10 expression in HSCs. They did report that mice that lacked the Grb10 gene did not develop blood cancers at one year of age which is good news. They also suggested that instead of deleting Grb10, new drugs could be identified that inhibit Grb10 function in HSCs.

UCSF study explains how chronic inflammation impairs blood stem cell function

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Inflammation is the immune system’s natural protective response to infection and injury. It involves the activation and mobilization of immune cells that can kill off foreign invaders and help repair damaged tissue. At the heart of the inflammatory response are hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These are blood stem cells found in the bone marrow that give rise to all blood cell types.

Under normal conditions, HSCs lie in a dormant state. But in response to inflammation they are triggered to rapidly divide and to differentiate into the immune cells needed. This initial response is beneficial in fighting off infection, however if left on for too long, HSCs lose their ability to self-renew (or make more of themselves) and regenerate a healthy blood system.

IL-1: Good Cop or Bad Cop?

A key player in the immune response to inflammation is a cytokine protein called Interleukin-1 or IL-1. It plays a beneficial role during an initial or acute inflammatory response: IL-1 along with other pro-inflammatory cytokines signals to HSCs that inflammation or infection is occurring and recruits certain immune cells from the blood into the tissue where they are needed.

However, IL-1 can also have negative effects on the immune system and high levels of this cytokine are found in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases such as obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. When HSCs are exposed IL-1 for long periods of time, they lose their regenerative abilities and  overproduce specific types of aggressive immune cells called myeloid cells that are needed to fight infection and repair injury but can also cause chronic inflammation and tissue damage. This can create an imbalance of blood cell types that impairs the function of the immune system.

So is IL-1 the good cop or the bad cop when it comes to inflammation and disease? A new CIRM-funded study from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), published yesterday in Nature Cell Biology, might have the answer.

A double-edged sword

The study was led by first author Dr. Eric Pietras, who is now an Assistant Professor of Hematology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. He along with senior author and UCSF Professor Dr. Emmanuelle Passegue, were interested in understanding whether IL-1 was a bystander or an active player in causing this transformation in HSCs that leads to chronic inflammatory disease.

To answer this question, Pietras and Passegue exposed mouse HSCs to IL-1, both in a cell culture dish and in mice. They found that IL-1 drove HSCs to rapidly differentiate into myeloid cells by activating a molecular circuit directed by the PU.1 gene, which is important for regulating HSC blood production. However, when mice were exposed to IL-1 for an extended period of 70 days – to mimic chronic inflammation – their HSCs were no longer able to do their normal job of regenerating all the cells of the blood and immune system.

I reached out to Dr. Pietras and asked him to explain what new insights his study has produced about the role of IL-1 during inflammation.

Eric Pietras

Eric Pietras

“IL-1 really is a double-edged sword; it’s great for turning on HSCs when you need them to make new first-responder myeloid cells quickly due to an injury or infection, and on the other hand, failure to turn the signal back off severely disrupts the ability of HSCs to make a balanced, healthy blood system, particularly in a regenerative context. I think this provides us with a clearer picture of why the blood system often functions poorly in chronic inflammatory disease patients.”

 

Negative effects of IL-1 are reversible

There’s good news though. Pietras and his team were able to reverse the negative effects of chronic IL-1 exposure on HSCs by simply removing IL-1. They proved this by transplanting HSCs from mice that were chronically treated with IL-1 and then taken off the treatment for a few weeks into irradiated mice that had no bone marrow and therefore no immune system. The transplanted HSCs were able to repopulate the entire immune system of the irradiated mice and did not show any regenerative dysfunction due to previous IL-1 treatment.

Dr. Pietras commented on the importance of their study:

“An important dimension of our study is to show in principle that HSCs can recover their functionality and return to making a healthy and balanced blood system if you can give them a break from the constant presence of inflammatory signals. This tells us that the negative effects of chronic inflammation on HSCs can be largely reversed if you can provide them with a break from the constant ‘emergency’ state IL-1 makes them think they’re in. This could impact how we treat chronic inflammatory disease.

 

Blocking IL-1 to treat chronic inflammation

So will drugs that inhibit IL-1 be a future therapy for patients suffering from chronic inflammatory disease? Anti-IL-1 drugs have been around for a while – one example is Kineret, which is an FDA-approved treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. But there are many other diseases caused by chronic inflammation that may or may not benefit from such treatment.

Dr. Passegue, in a UCSF press release, explained that their study’s findings are important for determining how anti-IL-1 therapy could be beneficial for patients.

“Understanding this mechanism helps us understand why these drugs are such promising treatments for patients with chronic inflammation.”

She also hinted that IL-1 could be a double-edged sword in stem cell populations of other tissues and that “reducing chronic IL-1 exposure may be an important approach for improving stem cell health and tissue function in the context of both inflammatory disease and normal aging.”


Related Links:

Scientists tackle aging by stabilizing defective blood stem cells in mice

Aging is an inevitable process that effects every cell, tissue, and organ in your body. You can live longer by maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle, but there is no magic pill that can prevent your body’s natural processes from slowly breaking down and becoming less efficient. As author Chinua Achebe would say, “Things Fall Apart”.

Adult stem cells are an unfortunate victim of the aging process. They have the important job of replenishing the cells in your body throughout your lifetime. However, as you grow older, adult stem cells lose their regenerative ability and fail to maintain the integrity and function of their tissues and organs. This can happen for a number of reasons, but no matter the cause, dysfunctional stem cells can accelerate aging and contribute to a shortened lifespan.

So to put it simply, aging adult stem cells = decline in stem cell function = shortened lifespan.

Dysfunctional blood stem cells make an unhappy immune system

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

A good example of this process is hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are adult stem cells found in bone marrow that make all the cells in our blood and immune system. When HSCs get old, they lose their edge and fail to generate some of the important blood cell types that are crucial for a healthy immune system. This can be life-threatening for elderly people who are at higher risk for infections and disease.

So how can we improve the function of aging HSCs to boost the immune system in older people and potentially extend their healthy years of life? A team of researchers from Germany might have an answer. They’ve identified a genetic switch that revitalizes aged, defective HSCs in mice and prolongs their lifespan. They published their findings this week in Nature Cell Biology.

Identifying the Per-petrator for aging HSCs

The perpetrator in this story is a gene called Per2. The team identified Per2 through a genetic screen of hundreds of potential tumor suppressor genes that could potentially impair the regenerative abilities of HSCs in response to DNA damage caused by aging.

It turns out that the Per2 gene is turned on in a subset of HSCs, called lymphoid-HSCs, that preferentially generate blood cells in the lymphatic system. These include B and T cells, both important parts of our immune system. When Per2 is turned on in lymphoid-HSCs, it activates the DNA damage response pathway. While responding to DNA damage may sound like a good thing, it also slows down the cell division process and prevents lymphoid-HSCs from producing their normal amount of lymphoid cells. Adding insult to injury, Per2 also activates the p53-dependent apoptosis pathway, which causes programmed cell death and further reduces the number of HSCs in reserve.

To address these problems, the team decided to delete the Per2 gene in mice and study the function of their HSCs as they aged. They found that removing Per2 stabilized lymphoid-HSCs and rescued their ability to generate the appropriate number of lymphoid cells. Per2 deletion also boosted their immune system, making the mice less susceptible to infection, and extended their lifespan by as much as 15 percent.

A key finding was that deleting Per2 did not increase the incidence of tumors in the aging mice – a logical concern as Per2 mutations in humans are link to increased cancer risk.

Per2 might not be a Per-fect solution for healthy aging

In summary, getting rid of Per2 in the HSCs of older mice improves their function and the function of their immune system while also extending their lifespan.

Senior author on the study, Karl Lenhard Rudolph, commented about their findings in a news release:

Karl Lenhard Rudolph. Photo: Anne Günther/FSU

Karl Lenhard Rudolph.

“All in all, these results are very promising, but equally surprising. We did not expect such a strong connection between switching off a single gene and improving the immune system so clearly.”

 

 

So Per2 may be a good healthy aging target in mice, but the real question is whether these results will translate to humans. Per2 is a circadian rhythm gene and is important for regulating the sleep-wake cycle. Deleting this gene in humans could cause sleep disorders and other unwanted side effects.

Rudolph acknowledges that his team needs to move their focus from mouse to humans.

“It is not yet clear whether this mutation in humans would have a benefit such as improved immune functions in aging — it is of great interest for us to further investigate this question.”

CIRM Scientists Discover Key to Blood Cells’ Building Blocks

Our bodies generate new blood cells—both red and white blood cells—each and every day. But reproducing that feat in a petri dish has proven far more difficult.

Pictured: sections from zebrafish embryos. Blood vessels are labeled in red, the protein complex that regulates inflammation green and cell nuclei in blue. The arrowhead indicates a potential HSC. The image at bottom right combines all channels. [Credit: UC San Diego School of Medicine]

Pictured: sections from zebrafish embryos. Blood vessels are labeled in red, the protein complex that regulates inflammation green and cell nuclei in blue. The arrowhead indicates a potential HSC. The image at bottom right combines all channels.
[Credit: UC San Diego School of Medicine]

But now, scientists have identified the missing ingredient to producing hematopoietic stem cells, or HSC’s—the type of stem cell that gives rise to all blood and immune cells in the body. The results, published last week in the journal Cell, describe how a newly discovered protein plays a key role in generating HSC’s in the developing embryo—giving scientists a more complete recipe to reproduce these cells in the lab.

The research, which was led by University of California, San Diego (UCSD) professor David Traver and supported by a grant from CIRM, offers renewed hope for the possibility of generating patient-specific blood or immune cells using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell) technology.

As Traver explained in last week’s news release:

“The development of some mature cell lineages from iPS cells, such as cardiac or neural, has been reasonably straightforward, but not with HSCs. This is likely due, at least in part, to not fully understanding all the factors used by the embryo to generate HSCs.”

Indeed, the ability to generate HSCs has long challenged scientists, as outlined in a CIRM workshop from last year. But now, says Traver, they have found a crucial piece to the puzzle.

Specifically, the researchers investigated a signaling protein called tumor necrosis factor alpha—or TNFα for short— a protein known to be important for regulating inflammation and immunity. Previous research by this study’s first author, Raquel Espin-Palazon, and others also discovered it was related to the healthy function of blood vessels during embryonic development.

In this study, Traver, Espin-Palazon and the UCSD drilled down even further—and found that TNFα was required for the normal development of HSCs in the embryo. This surprised the research team, as the young embryo is generally considered to be sterile—with no need for a protein normally charged with regulating immune response to be switched on. Explained Traver:

“There was no expectation that pro-inflammatory signaling would be active at this time or in the blood-forming regions.”

While preliminary, establishing this relationship between TNFα and HSC formation will be a boon to researchers looking for new ways to generate large quantities of healthy, patient-specific red and white blood cells for those patients who so desperately need them.

Learn more about how stem cell technology could help treat blood diseases in our Thalassemia Fact Sheet.