Using stem cells to fix bad behavior in the brain

 

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Gladstone Institutes Steven Finkbeiner and Gaia Skibinski: Photo courtesy Chris Goodfellow, Gladstone Institutes

Diseases of the brain have many different names, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s to ALS and Huntington’s, but they often have similar causes. Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco are using that knowledge to try and find an approach that might be effective against all of these diseases. In a new CIRM-funded study, they have identified one protein that could help do just that.

Many neurodegenerative diseases are caused by faulty proteins, which start to pile up and cause damage to neurons, the brain cells that are responsible for processing and transmitting information. Ultimately, the misbehaving proteins cause those cells to die.

The researchers at the Gladstone found a way to counter this destructive process by using a protein called Nrf2. They used neurons from humans (made from induced pluripotent stem cells – iPSCs – hence the stem cell connection here) and rats. They then tested these cells in neurons that were engineered to have two different kinds of mutations found in  Parkinson’s disease (PD) plus the Nrf2 protein.

Using a unique microscope they designed especially for this study, they were able to track those transplanted neurons and monitor what happened to them over the course of a week.

The neurons that expressed Nrf2 were able to render one of those PD-causing proteins harmless, and remove the other two mutant proteins from the brain cells.

In a news release to accompany the study in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, first author Gaia Skibinski, said Nrf2 acts like a house-cleaner brought in to tidy up a mess:

“Nrf2 coordinates a whole program of gene expression, but we didn’t know how important it was for regulating protein levels until now. Over-expressing Nrf2 in cellular models of Parkinson’s disease resulted in a huge effect. In fact, it protects cells against the disease better than anything else we’ve found.”

Steven Finkbeiner, the senior author on the study and a Gladstone professor, said this model doesn’t just hold out hope for treating Parkinson’s disease but for treating a number of other neurodegenerative problems:

“I am very enthusiastic about this strategy for treating neurodegenerative diseases. We’ve tested Nrf2 in models of Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and ALS, and it is the most protective thing we’ve ever found. Based on the magnitude and the breadth of the effect, we really want to understand Nrf2 and its role in protein regulation better.”

The next step is to use this deeper understanding to identify other proteins that interact with Nrf2, and potentially find ways to harness that knowledge for new therapies for neurodegenerative disorders.

Translating great stem cell ideas into effective therapies

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CIRM funds research trying to solve the Alzheimer’s puzzle

In science, there are a lot of terms that could easily mystify people without a research background; “translational” is not one of them. Translational research simply means to take findings from basic research and advance them into something that is ready to be tested in people in a clinical trial.

Yesterday our Governing Board approved $15 million in funding for four projects as part of our Translational Awards program, giving them the funding and support that we hope will ultimately result in them being tested in people.

Those projects use a variety of different approaches in tackling some very different diseases. For example, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco received $5.9 million to develop a new way to help the more than five million Americans battling Alzheimer’s disease. They want to generate brain cells to replace those damaged by Alzheimer’s, using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – an adult cell that has been changed or reprogrammed so that it can then be changed into virtually any other cell in the body.

CIRM’s mission is to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs and Alzheimer’s – which has no cure and no effective long-term treatments – clearly represents an unmet medical need.

Another project approved by the Board is run by a team at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI). They got almost $4.5 million for their research helping people with sickle cell anemia, an inherited blood disorder that causes intense pain, and can result in strokes and organ damage. Sickle cell affects around 100,000 people in the US, mostly African Americans.

The CHORI team wants to use a new gene-editing tool called CRISPR-Cas9 to develop a method of editing the defective gene that causes Sickle Cell, creating a healthy, sickle-free blood supply for patients.

Right now, the only effective long-term treatment for sickle cell disease is a bone marrow transplant, but that requires a patient to have a matched donor – something that is hard to find. Even with a perfect donor the procedure can be risky, carrying with it potentially life-threatening complications. Using the patient’s own blood stem cells to create a therapy would remove those complications and even make it possible to talk about curing the disease.

While damaged cartilage isn’t life-threatening it does have huge quality of life implications for millions of people. Untreated cartilage damage can, over time lead to the degeneration of the joint, arthritis and chronic pain. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) were awarded $2.5 million to develop an off-the-shelf stem cell product that could be used to repair the damage.

The fourth and final award ($2.09 million) went to Ankasa Regenerative Therapeutics, which hopes to create a stem cell therapy for osteonecrosis. This is a painful, progressive disease caused by insufficient blood flow to the bones. Eventually the bones start to rot and die.

As Jonathan Thomas, Chair of the CIRM Board, said in a news release, we are hoping this is just the next step for these programs on their way to helping patients:

“These Translational Awards highlight our goal of creating a pipeline of projects, moving through different stages of research with an ultimate goal of a successful treatment. We are hopeful these projects will be able to use our newly created Stem Cell Center to speed up their progress and pave the way for approval by the FDA for a clinical trial in the next few years.”

A new and improved method for making healthy heart tissue is here

Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have done it again. They’ve made a better and faster way of generating healthy heart tissue in mice with damaged hearts. With further advancements, their findings could potentially be translated into a new way of treating heart failure in patients.

Previously, the Gladstone team discovered that they could transform scar tissue in the damaged hearts of mice into healthy, beating heart muscle cells by a process called direct reprogramming. The team found that turning on three transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c and Tbx5 (collectively called GMT), in the damaged hearts of mice activated heart genes that turned scar tissue cells, also known as cardiac fibroblasts, into beating heart cells or cardiomyocytes.

Their GMT direct cardiac reprogramming technology was only able to turn 10 percent of cardiac fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes in mice over the period of six to eight week. In their new CIRM-funded study published in Circulation, they improved upon their original reprogramming method by identifying two chemicals that improved the efficiency of making new heart cells. Not only were they able to create eight times the number of beating cardiomyocytes from mouse cardiac fibroblasts, but they were also able to speed up the reprogramming process to a period of just one week.

To find these chemicals, they screened a library of 5,500 small molecules. The chemicals that looked most promising for cardiac reprogramming were inhibitors of the TGF-β and WNT signaling pathways. The importance of these chemicals was explained in a Gladstone news release:

“The first chemical inhibits a growth factor that helps cells grow and divide and is important for repairing tissue after injury. The second chemical inhibits an important pathway that regulates heart development. By combining the two chemicals with GMT, the researchers successfully regenerated heart muscle and greatly improved heart function in mice that had suffered a heart attack.”

Senior author on the study, Deepak Srivastava, further explained:

“While our original process for direct cardiac reprogramming with GMT has been promising, it could be more efficient. With our screen, we discovered that chemically inhibiting two biological pathways active in embryonic formation improves the speed, quantity, and quality of the heart cells produced from our original process.”

Encouraged by their studies in mice, the scientists also tested their new and improved direct reprogramming method on human cells. Previously they found that while the same GMT transcription factors could reprogram human cardiac fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, a combination of seven factors was required to make quality cardiomyocytes comparable to those seen in mice. But with the addition of the two inhibitors, they were able to reduce the number of reprogramming factors from seven to four, which included the GMT factors and one additional factor called Myocardin. These four factors plus the two chemical inhibitors were capable of reprograming human cardiac fibroblasts into beating heart cells.

With heart failure affecting more than 20 million people globally, the need for new therapies that can regenerate the heart is pressing. The Gladstone team is hoping to advance their research to a point where it could be tested in human patients with heart failure. First author on the study, Tamer Mohamed, concluded:

“Heart failure afflicts many people worldwide, and we still do not have an effective treatment for patients suffering from this disease. With our enhanced method of direct cardiac reprogramming, we hope to combine gene therapy with drugs to create better treatments for patients suffering from this devastating disease.”

Tamer Mohamed and Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institutes

Tamer Mohamed and Deepak Srivastava. Photo courtesy of Chris Goodfellow, Gladstone Institutes


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How research on a rare disease turned into a faster way to make stem cells

Forest Gump. (Paramount Pictures)

Forest Gump. (Paramount Pictures)

If Forest Gump were a scientist, I’d like to think he would have said his iconic line a little differently. Dr. Gump would have said, “scientific research is like a box of chocolates – you never know what you’re gonna get.”

A new CIRM-funded study coming out of the Gladstone Institutes certainly proves this point. Published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study found that a specific genetic mutation known to cause a rare disease called fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) makes it easier to reprogram adult skin cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

Shinya Yamanaka received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 2012 for his seminal discovery of the iPSC technology, which enabled scientists to generate patient specific pluripotent stem cell lines from adult cells like skin and blood. These iPSC lines are useful for modeling disease in a dish, identifying new therapeutic drugs, and potentially for clinical applications in patients. However, one of the rate-limiting steps to this technology is the inefficient process of making iPSCs.

Yamanaka, a senior investigator at Gladstone, knows this problem all too well. In a Gladstone news release he commented, “inefficiency in creating iPSCs is a major roadblock toward applying this technology to biomedicine. Our study identified a surprising way to increase the number of iPSCs that we can generate.”

So how did Yamanaka and his colleagues discover this new trick for making iPSCs more efficiently? Originally, their intentions were to model a rare genetic disease called FOP. It’s commonly known as “stone man syndrome” because the disease converts normal muscle and connective tissue into bone either spontaneously or spurred by injury. Bone growth begins at a young age starting at the neck and progressively moving down the body. Because there is no treatment or cure, patients typically have a lifespan of only 40 years.

The Gladstone team wanted to understand this rare disease better by modeling it in a dish using iPSCs generated from patients with FOP. These patients had a genetic mutation in the ACVR1 gene, which plays an important role in the development of the embryo. FOP patients have a mutant form of ACVR1 that overstimulates this developmental pathway and boosts the activity of a protein called BMP (bone morphogenic protein). When BMP signaling is ramped up, they discovered that they could produce significantly more iPSCs from the skin cells of FOP patients compared to normal, healthy skin cells.

First author on the study, Yohei Hayashi, explained their hypothesis for why this mutation makes it easier to generate iPSCs:

“Originally, we wanted to establish a disease model for FOP that might help us understand how specific gene mutations affect bone formation. We were surprised to learn that cells from patients with FOP reprogrammed much more efficiently than cells from healthy patients. We think this may be because the same pathway that causes bone cells to proliferate also helps stem cells to regenerate.”

To be sure that enhanced BMP signaling caused by the ACVR1 mutation was the key to generating more iPSCs, they blocked this signal and discovered that much fewer iPSCs were made from FOP patient skin cells.

Senior Investigator Bruce Conklin, who was a co-author on this study, succinctly summarized the importance of their findings:

“This is the first reported case showing that a naturally occurring genetic mutation improves the efficiency of iPSC generation. Creating iPSCs from patient cells carrying genetic mutations is not only useful for disease modeling, but can also offer new insights into the reprogramming process.”

Gladstone investigators Bruce Conklin and Shinya Yamanaka. (Photo courtesy of Chris Goodfellow, Gladstone Institutes)

Gladstone investigators Bruce Conklin and Shinya Yamanaka. (Photo courtesy of Chris Goodfellow, Gladstone Institutes)

From Pig Parts to Stem Cells: Scientist Douglas Melton Wins Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize for Work on Diabetes

Since the 1920s, insulin injections have remained the best solution for managing type 1 diabetes. Patients with this disease do not make enough insulin – a hormone that regulates the sugar levels in your blood – because the insulin-producing cells, or beta cells, in their pancreas are destroyed.

Back then, it took two tons of pig parts to make eight ounces of insulin, which was enough to treat 10,000 diabetic patients for six months. Biotech and pharmaceutical companies have since developed different types of human insulin treatments that include fast and long acting versions of the hormone. It’s estimated that $22 billion will be spent on developing insulin products for patients this year and that costs will rise to $32 billion in the year 2019.

These costs are necessary to keep insulin-dependent diabetes patients alive and healthy, but what if there was a different, potentially simpler solution to manage diabetes? One that looks to insulin-producing beta cells as the solution rather than daily hormone shots?

Douglas Melton Receives Stem Cell Prize for Work on Diabetes

Harvard scientist Douglas Melton envisions a world where one day, insulin-dependent diabetic patients are given stem cell transplants rather than shots to manage their diabetes. In the 90s, Melton’s son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Motivated by his son’s diagnosis, Melton dedicated the focus of his research on understanding how beta cells develop from stem cells in the body and also in a cell culture dish.

Almost 30 years later, Melton has made huge strides towards understanding the biology of beta cell development and has generated methods to “reprogram” or coax pluripotent stem cells into human beta cells.

Melton was honored for his important contributions to stem cell and diabetes research at the second annual Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize ceremony last week at the Gladstone Institutes. This award recognizes outstanding scientists that are translating stem cell research from the lab to clinical trials in patients.

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Deepak Srivastava, director of the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, explained why Melton was selected as this year’s prize winner:

Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institutes

Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institutes

“Doug’s research on genetic markers expressed during pancreas development have led to a reliable way to reprogram stem cells into human beta cells. His work provides the foundation for the ultimate goal of transplantable, patient-specific beta cells.”

 

Making Beta Cells for Patients

During the awards ceremony, Melton discussed his latest work on generating beta cells from human stem cells and how this technology could transform the way insulin-dependent patients are treated.

Douglas Melton, Harvard University.

Douglas Melton, Harvard University.

“I don’t mean to say that this [insulin treatment] isn’t a good idea. That’s keeping these people alive and in good health,” said Melton during his lecture. “What I want to talk about is a different approach. Rather than making more and better insulins and providing them by different medical devices, why not go back to nature’s solution which is the beta cells that makes the insulin?”

Melton first described his initial research on making pancreatic beta cells from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells in a culture dish. He described the power of this system for not only modeling diabetes, but also screening for potential drugs, and testing new therapies in animal models.

He also mentioned how he and his colleagues are developing methods to manufacture large amounts of human beta cells derived from pluripotent stem cells for use in patients. They are able to culture stem cells in large spinning flasks that accelerate the growth and development of pluripotent stem cells into billions of human beta cells.

Challenges and Future of Stem-Cell Derived Diabetes Treatments

Melton expressed a positive outlook for the future of stem cell-derived treatments for insulin-dependent diabetes, but he also mentioned two major challenges. The first is the need for better control over the methods that make beta cells from stem cells. These methods could be more efficient and generate higher numbers of beta cells (beta cells make up 16% of stem cell-derived cells using their current culturing methods). The second is preventing an autoimmune attack after transplanting the stem-cell derived beta cells into patients.

Melton and other scientists are already working on improving techniques to make more beta cells from stem cells. As for preventing transplanted beta cells from being attacked by the patient’s immune system, Melton described two possibilities: using an encapsulation device or biological protection to mask the transplanted cells from an attack.

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He mentioned a CIRM-funded clinical trial by ViaCyte, which is testing an encapsulation device that is placed under the skin. The device contains embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic progenitor cells that develop into beta cells that secrete insulin into the blood stream. The device also prevents the immune system from attacking and killing the beta cells.

Melton also discussed a biological approach to protecting transplanted beta cells. In collaboration with Dan Anderson at MIT, they coated stem cell-derived beta cells in a biomaterial called alginate, which comes from seaweed. They injected alginate microcapsule-containing beta cells into diabetic mice and were able control their blood sugar levels.

At the end of his talk, Melton concluded that he believes that beta cell transplantation in an immunoprotective device containing stem cell-derived cells will have the most benefit for diabetes patients.

Gladstone Youtube video of Douglas Melton’s lecture at the Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize lecture.


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Multi-Talented Stem Cells: The Many Ways to Use Them in the Clinic

CIRM kicked off the 2016 International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Conference in San Francisco with a public stem cell event yesterday that brought scientists, patients, patient advocates and members of the general public together to discuss the many ways stem cells are being used in the clinic to develop treatments for patients with unmet medical needs.

Bruce Conklin, Gladstone Institutes & UCSF

Bruce Conklin, Gladstone Institutes & UCSF

Bruce Conklin, an Investigator at the Gladstone Institutes and UCSF Professor, moderated the panel of four scientists and three patient advocates. He immediately captured the audience’s attention by showing a stunning video of human heart cells, beating in synchrony in a petri dish. Conklin explained that scientists now have the skills and technology to generate human stem cell models of cardiomyopathy (heart disease) and many other diseases in a dish.

Conklin went on to highlight four main ways that stem cells are contributing to human therapy. First is using stem cells to model diseases whose causes are still largely unknown (like with Parkinson’s disease). Second, genome editing of stem cells is a new technology that has the potential to offer cures to patients with genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia. Third, stem cells are known to secrete healing factors, and transplanting them into humans could be beneficial. Lastly, stem cells can be engineered to attack cancer cells and overcome cancer’s normal way of evading the immune system.

Before introducing the other panelists, Conklin made the final point that stem cell models are powerful because scientists can use them to screen and develop new drugs for diseases that have no treatments or cures. His lab is already working on identifying new drugs for heart disease using human induced pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with cardiomyopathy.

Scientists and Patient Advocates Speak Out

Malin Parmar, Lund University

Malin Parmar, Lund University

The first scientist to speak was Malin Parmar, a Professor at Lund University. She discussed the history of stem cell development for clinical trials in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Her team is launching the first in-human trial for Parkinson’s using cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells in 2016. After Parmar’s talk, John Lipp, a PD patient advocate. He explained that while he might look normal standing in front of the crowd, his PD symptoms vary wildly throughout the day and make it hard for him to live a normal life. He believes in the work that scientists like Parmar are doing and confidently said, “In my lifetime, we will find a stem cell cure for Parkinson’s disease.”

Adrienne Shapiro, Patient Advocate

Adrienne Shapiro, Patient Advocate

The next scientist to speak was UCLA Professor Donald Kohn. He discussed his lab’s latest efforts to develop stem cell treatments for different blood disorder diseases. His team is using gene therapy to modify blood stem cells in bone marrow to treat and cure babies with SCID, also known as “bubble-boy disease”. Kohn also mentioned their work in sickle cell disease (SCD) and in chronic granulomatous disease, both of which are now in CIRM-funded clinical trials. He was followed by Adrienne Shapiro, a patient advocate and mother of a child with SCD. Adrienne gave a passionate and moving speech about her family history of SCD and her battle to help find a cure for her daughter. She said “nobody plans to be a patient advocate. It is a calling born of necessity and pain. I just wanted my daughter to outlive me.”

Henry Klassen (UC Irvine)

Henry Klassen, UC Irvine

Henry Klassen, a professor at UC Irvine, next spoke about blinding eye diseases, specifically retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This disease damages the photo receptors in the back of the eye and eventually causes blindness. There is no cure for RP, but Klassen and his team are testing the safety of transplanting human retinal progenitor cells in to the eyes of RP patients in a CIRM-funded Phase 1/2 clinical trial.

Kristen MacDonald, RP patient

Kristen MacDonald, RP patient

RP patient, Kristen MacDonald, was the trial’s first patient to be treated. She bravely spoke about her experience with losing her vision. She didn’t realize she was going blind until she had a series of accidents that left her with two broken arms. She had to reinvent herself both physically and emotionally, but now has hope that she might see again after participating in this clinical trial. She said that after the transplant she can now finally see light in her bad eye and her hope is that in her lifetime she can say, “One day, people used to go blind.”

Lastly, Catriona Jamieson, a professor and Alpha Stem Cell Clinic director at UCSD, discussed how she is trying to develop new treatments for blood cancers by eradicating cancer stem cells. Her team is conducting a Phase 1 CIRM-funded clinical trial that’s testing the safety of an antibody drug called Cirmtuzumab in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

Scientists and Patients need to work together

Don Kohn, Catriona Jamieson, Malin Parmar

Don Kohn, Catriona Jamieson, Malin Parmar

At the end of the night, the scientists and patient advocates took the stage to answer questions from the audience. A patient advocate in the audience asked, “How can we help scientists develop treatments for patients more quickly?”

The scientists responded that stem cell research needs more funding and that agencies like CIRM are making this possible. However, we need to keep the momentum going and to do that both the physicians, scientists and patient advocates need to work together to advocate for more support. The patient advocates in the panel couldn’t have agreed more and voiced their enthusiasm for working together with scientists and clinicians to make their hopes for cures a reality.

The CIRM public event was a huge success and brought in more than 150 people, many of whom stayed after the event to ask the panelists more questions. It was a great kick off for the ISSCR conference, which starts today. For coverage, you can follow the Stem Cellar Blog for updates on interesting stem cell stories that catch our eye.

CIRM Public Stem Cell Event

CIRM Public Stem Cell Event

A new way to make heart stem cells could potentially repair the damage of heart disease

Today we’re going to talk about heart failure. It’s a sobering topic given that over 20 million people world wide are currently suffering from this disease. Heart failure happens when the body’s heart can no longer pump blood effectively, which can lead to many nasty side effects and inevitably hastens death.

Typical strategies for treating heart failure focus on managing symptoms and delaying disease progression. But for patients, many of whom are elderly, a life of chronic management and frequent hospital stays is daunting. They deserve better.

Here’s where stem cell research could provide new treatments for heart failure. Some stem cells can be coaxed into new heart tissue that could repair damage and restore heart function. While other types of stem cells can release factors that facilitate the development of new blood vessels or that reduce tissue scarring, both of which improve heart function. Some of these treatments are being tested in clinical trials (for instance CIRM is funding a stem cell trial for heart disease sponsored by Capricor Therapeutics), although none have been approved yet.

But there’s good news on this front. Today, the Gladstone Institutes published a study in Cell Stem Cell describing a new method for making transplantable heart stem cells that improved heart function in mice and could potentially treat heart failure in humans.

A new method for making transplantable heart stem cells

The goal of the Gladstone study was to generate a specific type of heart stem cell called a cardiovascular progenitor cell that could survive and develop into the different types of mature heart cells to improve heart function when transplanted into mice.

Using technology previously developed in the lab of Gladstone Professor Sheng Ding, the team used a cocktail of chemicals to turn skin cells into cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). These cells are like stem cells but specific to the heart and thus can only make heart cells. The CPCs they made had two important qualities: they could be expanded in a culture dish for multiple generations and they could develop into the three main types of adult heart cells (cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) that are required for heart regeneration.

Scientists made a new type of heart stem cell that can turn into the three main types of adult heart cells. (Image: Yu Zhang)

Gladstone scientists made a new type of heart stem cell that can make the three main types of adult heart cells. (Image: Yu Zhang)

Because of their ability to replicate and to become adult heart cells, they named these cells induced expandable cardiovascular progenitor cells or ieCPCs. They transplanted ieCPCs in mice that had suffered a heart attack and were pleased to see that 90% of engrafted cells (the ones that survived and stuck around) developed into functioning heart cells that worked seamlessly with the existing heart cells to improve the damaged heart’s ability to pump blood. From a single injection of one million ieCPCs, the improvements in heart function lasted for three months.

In a Gladstone News Release, first author on the study, Yu Zhang, explained why ieCPCs are better for transplantation into damaged hearts than adult heart cells like cardiomyocytes or the muscle cells of the heart:

“Scientists have tried for decades to treat heart failure by transplanting adult heart cells, but these cells cannot reproduce themselves, and so they do not survive in the damaged heart. Our generated ieCPCs can prolifically replicate and reliably mature into the three types of cells in the heart, which makes them a very promising potential treatment for heart failure.”

Another benefit to ieCPCs was that they did not generate tumors when transplanted. This can happen with non-heart stem cells or with cells derived from pluripotent stem cells.

What does the future hold for ieCPCs?

A heart attack can kill more than one billion heart cells, and while the heart has some regenerative ability, it cannot replace that many cells on its own. The Gladstone study is exciting because it provides a new population of heart stem cells that can be expanded in a dish to generate a large donor population of stem cells for transplantation.

Senior author Shen Ding spoke to the robustness of their new stem cell technology:

Sheng Ding

Sheng Ding

“Cardiac progenitor cells could be ideal for heart regeneration. They are the closest precursor to functional heart cells, and, in a single step, they can rapidly and efficiently become heart cells, both in a dish and in a live heart. With our new technology, we can quickly create billions of these cells in a dish and then transplant them into damaged hearts to treat heart failure.”

Additionally, their new method opens the doors for generating patient-specific stem cell treatments.

“Because these cells are generated from skin cells, it opens the door for personalized medicine, using a patient’s own cells to treat their disease.”

Sheng Ding’s lab is one to watch if you follow research in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. We recently blogged about a different but equally important study from his lab where he made functional pancreatic beta cells from skin as a potential cell therapy for diabetes. I hope that his team will ultimately be able to translate their current research in both diabetes and heart disease towards clinical applications in humans.

Growing Stem Cell Research in California (Video)

How a Gladstone scientist is using bioengineering to push the pace of stem cell research

At CIRM, we strive to fund the most promising stem cell research and speed the advancement of stem cell treatments to patients who need them. Because we are a state agency, we generally focus on funding scientists, universities, and companies located in California. But we recognize that high quality stem cell research is ongoing throughout the country. That’s why CIRM has programs that fund research originating outside California and that recruit talented stem cell scientists to join our state’s vibrant stem cell community.

Today we want to share a video we produced titled, “Growing Stem Cell Research in California” that provides an example of how CIRM has catalyzed the growth of stem cell research by helping recruit Dr. Todd McDevitt, a leading biomedical engineer in stem cell research, to the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco.

Todd started his lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and moved to the Gladstone a year ago to conduct research using human pluripotent stem cells to engineer 3D micro-tissues for use in drug development and disease modeling. His move was made possible by a CIRM Research Leadership Award, which allowed the Gladstone to recruit Todd and is now his lab’s major source of funding.

Todd McDevitt, Gladstone Institutes

Todd McDevitt, Gladstone Institutes

With an expertise in tissue engineering, Todd and his team are collaborating with other researchers at the Gladstone on projects that use human stem cells to create organ-like tissues to advance research and therapeutic development for a wide range of areas including brain disease, heart disease and spinal cord injury.

Todd is a young and talented scientist who is using his expertise in bioengineering to push the pace of stem cell research ultimately, we hope, to improve human health. You can read more about Todd’s first year anniversary at the Gladstone in their latest news release.

A Win for Diabetes: Scientists Make Functional Pancreatic Cells From Skin

Today is an exciting day for diabetes research and patients. For the first time, scientists have succeeded in making functional pancreatic beta cells from human skin. This new method for making the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas could produce a new, more effective treatment for patients suffering from diabetes.

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes and the University of California, San Francisco published these promising findings today in the journal Nature Communications.

Making pancreatic cells from skin

They used a technique called direct reprogramming to turn human skin cells directly into pancreatic beta cells without having to go all the way back to a pluripotent stem cell state. The skin cells were treated with factors used to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and with pancreatic-specific molecules. This cocktail of factors and molecules shut off the skin genes and turned on genes of the pancreas.

The end product was endoderm progenitor cells, which are like stem cells but can only generate cell types specific to organs derived from the endoderm layer (for example: lungs, thyroid, pancreas). The scientists took these endoderm progenitors and further coaxed them into mature, pancreatic beta cells after treatment with another cocktail of molecules.

Functioning human pancreatic cells after they’ve been transplanted into a mouse. (Image: Saiyong Zhu, Gladstone)

Functioning human pancreatic cells after they’ve been transplanted into a mouse. (Image: Saiyong Zhu, Gladstone)

While the pancreatic cells they made looked and acted like the real thing in a dish (they were able to secrete insulin when exposed to glucose), the authors needed to confirm that they functioned properly in animals. They transplanted the mature beta cells into mice that were engineered to have diabetes, and observed that the human beta cells protected the mice from becoming diabetic by properly regulating their blood glucose levels.

Importantly, none of the mice receiving human cells got tumors, which is always a concern when transplanting reprogrammed cells or cells derived from pluripotent stem cells.

What does this mean?

This study is groundbreaking because it offers a new and more efficient method to make functioning human beta cells in mass quantities.

Dr. Sheng Ding, a CIRM funded senior investigator at the Gladstone and co-senior author, explained in a Gladstone news release:

Sheng Ding

Sheng Ding

“This new cellular reprogramming and expansion paradigm is more sustainable and scalable than previous methods. Using this approach, cell production can be massively increased while maintaining quality control at multiple steps. This development ensures much greater regulation in the manufacturing process of new cells. Now we can generate virtually unlimited numbers of patient-matched insulin-producing pancreatic cells.”

 

Matthias Hebrok, director of the Diabetes Center at UCSF and co-senior author on paper discussed the potential research and clinical applications of their findings:

Mattias Hebrok

Matthias Hebrok

“Our results demonstrate for the first time that human adult skin cells can be used to efficiently and rapidly generate functional pancreatic cells that behave similar to human beta cells. This finding opens up the opportunity for the analysis of patient-specific pancreatic beta cell properties and the optimization of cell therapy approaches.”

 

The study does mention the caveat that their direct reprogramming approach wasn’t able to generate all the cell types of the pancreas. Having these support cells would better recreate the pancreatic environment and likely improve the function of the transplanted beta cells.

Lastly, I find this study exciting because it kills two birds with one stone. Scientists can use this technique to make better cellular models of diabetes to understand why the disease happens, and they could also develop new cell replacement therapies in humans. Already, stem cell derived pancreatic beta cells are being tested in human clinical trials for type 1 diabetes (one of them is a CIRM-funded clinical trial by Viacyte) and it seems likely that beta cells derived from skin will follow suit.


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CIRM Scholar Helen Fong on Stem Cells and Brain Disease

Helen Fong, CIRM Scholar and Research Scientist at the Gladstone Institutes

Helen Fong, CIRM Scholar and Research Scientist at the Gladstone Institutes

Meet another one of our talented CIRM Scholars, Helen Fong. She is currently a Research Scientist at the Gladstone Institutes and did her graduate work at the University of California, Irvine. Her passions include stem cells, disease modeling, and playing with differentiation protocols – the processes that tell stem cells to mature into specific tissues. As a CIRM Scholar, part of our educational training programs, Helen published four articles where she was listed as the first author. Her most recent one was a stellar study published in Stem Cell Reports using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model and understand a nerve cell-destroying brain disease called frontotemporal dementia.

We interviewed Helen to learn more about her work in stem cell research.


Q: What was your graduate school research on?

HF: I did my graduate work in the lab of Dr. Peter Donovan, who is a prominent germ cell and stem cell scientist, and was newly recruited to UCI when I began my studies. I was his first graduate student from UCI. Dr. Donovan’s research was focused on understanding the regulation of early human development using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and how to improve human pluripotent stem cell culture. He was also interested in understanding the biological mechanisms that keep stem cells pluripotent (the ability to become all the other cell types in the body) and the genetic factors that are important for maintaining pluripotency. My graduate research was on understanding the basic biology of human ESCs. Specifically, I studied the role of the gene Sox2 in maintaining stem cell pluripotency and self renewal in human ESCs.

Q: What about your postdoctoral research?

HF: After my PhD, I decided to continue to work with stem cells because I knew that the field would continue to grow. There was still so much to be learned about these unique cells. I also genuinely enjoyed working with stem cells and couldn’t imagine not seeing them every day. I realized that I had a solid understanding of the basic biology of ESCs, but I wanted to use stem cells to study human disease. This ability is one of the huge selling points of working with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) [which are created by reprogramming adult cells back to a pluripotent state]. The Gladstone Institutes was an excellent place to continue my training and to begin using iPSCs to understand neurological disease. I joined Dr. Yadong Huang’s lab in 2011 and am currently using human iPSCs to study brain degenerative diseases including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

My recent publication in Stem Cell Reports used human iPSCs from a patient with FTD as a model to understand the mechanisms behind this condition. This patient carried a rare genetic mutation in the MAPT gene called TAU-A152T. Several studies have reported a number of patients with this specific mutation that could put them at risk for developing FTD, PSP, and AD. However, it wasn’t clear what this mutation was doing to cause these disorders.

One of the ways you can study neurodegenerative diseases is using stem cells derived from patients harboring the disease causing mutations. We obtained human iPSCs made from the skin cells of a patient with FTD and this TAU mutation. I then used zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) genome editing technology to genetically correct the mutation back to the wild type (normal) sequence to see if removing this mutation in the patient iPSCs would generate healthier neurons (nerve cells) that don’t have symptoms of FTD. I was able to study the disease-causing effects of the TAU mutation by comparing healthy neurons I made from the corrected (normal) iPSC line to diseased neurons made from the TAU mutant iPSC line.

Neurons generated from FTD patient iPSCs. (Image courtesy of Helen Fong)

Neurons generated from FTD patient iPSCs. (Image courtesy of Helen Fong)

The neurons that I differentiated from the iPSCs carrying the TAU mutation showed an increase in TAU protein fragmentation [meaning the protein gets degraded and isn’t present in its normal form], an abnormal characteristic that can be associated with FTD and AD. We didn’t see this phenomenon in the neurons from the corrected (normal) human iPSCs, indicating that removal of this TAU mutation could improve the symptoms of these diseases. These results were exciting because we now had a culprit for what could be causing disease in these patients with this mutation. There is still much to be learned about the mechanisms of this mutation and the iPSCs have been an invaluable resource.

Q: What was your experience like as a CIRM scholar?

HF: CIRM has funded me for almost all of my stem cell training and research. I got my first CIRM training grant as a graduate student at UCI in 2006 and was funded for three years as a postdoc at the Gladstone. So I have CIRM to thank for all of my training.

When I first started out as a CIRM scholar, I believe I was part of one of their earlier pre-doctoral training grant programs. As the program expanded, I got to meet many of the other trainees at CIRM research conferences and interact with prominent stem cell scientists in the area. This was an incredible experience because I was exposed to stem cell research outside of my own institute, and I was able to meet all the big players in the field!

CIRM has also been very generous and provided me a travel allowance to attend any scientific conference of my choice. Over the years, I’ve gone to a lot of conferences nationally and internationally including ISSCR (International Society for Stem Cell Research), Keystone symposia, and the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). I have given scientific talks both at Keystone and SfN, and they proved to be excellent exposure for my work as well as a good place to get feedback. Another one of my favorite perks was the ability to purchase reagents for my own work at my own discretion, which gave me some freedom in dictating which direction I wanted my project to go. If I wanted to study a particular protein and needed a specific antibody to do that, I was able to get it with my CIRM funding.

Q: What’s next for your career?

HF: Currently, I am hoping to wrap up the project I am working on in the lab right now and generate a publication. I plan to continue to work on stem cells in the next step of my career and to work on challenging and cutting-edge projects. I feel fortunate for all the training and resources that I’ve received that got me to where I am today, and I hope to pass on many of my skills and knowledge to budding, young scientists.

Q: What is your favorite thing about being a scientist?

HF: I really enjoy the fact that I have so much control over the fate of my stem cells. They have the ability to turn into almost any cell type, and we’ve developed so many protocols to guide them into the exact cell type we want. They don’t always behave, but I think figuring out the personality of each and every cell line is part of the fun.


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