Stem cell stories that caught our eye: bubble baby therapy a go in UK, in-utero stem cell trial and novel heart disease target

There were lots of CIRM mentions in the news this week. Here are two brief recaps written by Karen Ring to get you up to speed. A third story by Todd Dubnicoff summarizes an promising finding related to heart disease by researchers in Singapore.  

CIRM-funded “bubble baby” disease therapy gets special designation by UK.
Orchard Therapeutics, a company based in the UK and the US, is developing a stem cell-based gene therapy called OTL-101 to treat a primary immune disease called adenosine-deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), also known as “bubble baby disease”. CIRM is funding a Phase 1/2 clinical trial led by Don Kohn of UCLA in collaboration with Orchard and the University College in London.

In July, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) awarded OTL-101 Rare Pediatric Disease Designation (read more about it here), which makes the therapy eligible for priority review by the FDA, and could give it a faster route to being made more widely available to children in need.

On Tuesday, Orchard announced further good news that OTL-101 received “Promising Innovative Medicine Designation” by the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). In a news release, the company explained how this designation bodes well for advancing OTL-101 from clinical trials into patients,

“The designation as Promising Innovative Medicine is the first step of a two-step process under which OTL-101 can benefit from the Early Access to Medicine Scheme (“EAMS”). Nicolas Koebel, Senior Vice President for Business Operations at Orchard, added: “With this PIM designation we can potentially make OTL-101 available to UK patients sooner under the Early Access to Medicine Scheme”.

CIRM funded UCSF clinical trial mentioned in SF Business Times
Ron Leuty, reporter at the San Francisco Business Times, published an article about a CIRM-funded trial out of UCSF that is targeting a rare genetic blood disease called alpha thalassemia major, describing it as, “The world’s first in-utero blood stem cell transplant, soon to be performed at the University of California, San Francisco, could point the way toward pre-birth cures for a range of blood diseases, such as sickle cell disease.”

Alpha Thalassemia affects the ability of red blood cells to carry oxygen because of a reduction in a protein called hemoglobin. The UCSF trial, spearheaded by UCSF Pediatric surgeon Dr. Tippi MacKenzie, is hoping to use stem cells from the mother to treat babies in the womb to give them a better chance at surviving after birth.

In an interview with Leuty, Tippi explained,

“Our goal is to put in enough cells so the baby won’t need another transplant. But even if we fall short, if we can just establish 1 percent maternal cells circulating in the child, it will establish tolerance and then they can get the booster transplant.”

She also emphasized the key role that CIRM funded played in the development and launch of this clinical trial.

“CIRM is about more than funding for studies, MacKenzie said. Agency staff has provided advice about how to translate animal studies into work in humans, she said, as well as hiring an FDA consultant, writing an investigational new drug application and setting up a clinical protocol.”

“I’m a clinician, but running a clinical trial is different,” MacKenzie said. “CIRM’s been incredibly helpful in helping me navigate that.”

Heart, heal thyself: the story of Singheart
When you cut your finger or scrape a knee, a scab forms, allowing the skin underneath to regenerate and repair itself. The heart is not so lucky – it has very limited self-healing abilities. Instead, heart muscle cells damaged after a heart attack form scar tissue, making each heart beat less efficient. This condition can lead to chronic heart disease, the number one killer of both men and women in the US.

A mouse heart cell with 2 nuclei (blue) and Singheart RNA labelled by red fluorescent dyes.
Credit: A*STAR’s Genome Institute of Singapore

Research has shown that newborn mice retain the ability to completely regenerate and repair injuries to the heart because their heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, are still able to divide and replenish damaged cells. But by adulthood, the mouse cardiomyocytes lose the ability to stimulate the necessary cell division processes. A research team in Singapore wondered what was preventing cardiomyocytes cell division in adult mice and if there was some way to lift that block.

This week in Nature Communications, they describe the identification of a molecule they call Singheart that may be the answer to their questions. Using tools that allow the analysis of gene activity in single cells revealed that a rare population of diseased cardiomyocytes are able to crank up genes related to cell division. And further analysis showed Singheart, a specialized genetic molecule called a long non-coding RNA, played a role in blocking this cell division gene.

As lead author Dr. Roger Foo, a principal investigator at Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and the National University Health System (NUHS), explained in a press release, these findings may lead to new self-healing strategies for heart disease,

“There has always been a suspicion that the heart holds the key to its own healing, regenerative and repair capability. But that ability seems to become blocked as soon as the heart is past its developmental stage. Our findings point to this potential block that when lifted, may allow the heart to heal itself.”

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CIRM-funded life-saving stem cell therapy gets nod of approval from FDA

Cured_AR_2016_coverIf you have read our 2016 Annual Report (and if you haven’t you should, it’s brilliant) or just seen the cover you’ll know that it features very prominently a young girl named Evie Padilla Vaccaro.

Evie was born with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency or SCID – also known as “bubble baby disease”; we’ve written about it here. SCID is a rare but deadly immune disorder which leaves children unable to fight off simple infections. Many children with SCID die in the first few years of life.

Fortunately for Evie and her family, Dr. Don Kohn and his team at UCLA, working with a UK-based company called Orchard Therapeutics Ltd., have developed a treatment called OTL-101. This involves taking the patient’s own blood stem cells, genetically modifying them to correct the SCID mutation, and then returning the cells to the patient. Those modified cells create a new blood supply, and repair the child’s immune system.

Evie was treated with OTL-101 when she was a few months old. She is cured. And she isn’t the only one. To date more than 40 children have been treated with this method. All have survived and are doing well.

Orchard Therapeutics

 FDA acknowledgement

Because of that success the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted OTL-101 Rare Pediatric Disease Designation. This status is given to a treatment that targets a serious or life-threatening disease that affects less than 200,000 people, most of whom are under 18 years of age.

The importance of the Rare Pediatric Disease Designation is that it gives the company certain incentives for the therapy’s development, including priority review by the FDA. That means if it continues to show it is safe and effective it may have a faster route to being made more widely available to children in need.

In a news release Anne Dupraz, PhD, Orchard’s Chief Regulatory Officer, welcomed the decision:

“Together with Orphan Drug and Breakthrough Therapy Designations, this additional designation is another important development step for the OTL-101 clinical program. It reflects the potential of this gene therapy treatment to address the significant unmet medical need of children with ADA-SCID and eligibility for a Pediatric Disease Priority Review voucher at time of approval.”

Creating a trend

This is the second time in less than two weeks that a CIRM-funded therapy has been awarded Rare Pediatric Disease designation. Earlier this month Capricor Therapeutics was given that status for its treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Two other CIRM-funded clinical trials – Humacyte and jCyte – have been given Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy Designation (RMAT) by the FDA. This makes them eligible for earlier and faster interactions with the FDA, and also means they may be able to apply for priority review and faster approval.

All these are encouraging signs for a couple of reasons. It suggests that the therapies are showing real promise in clinical trials. And it shows that the FDA is taking steps to encourage those therapies to advance as quickly – and safely of course – as possible.

Credit where credit is due

In the past we have been actively critical of the FDA’s sluggish pace in moving stem cell therapies out of the lab and into clinical trials where they can be tested in people. So when the FDA does show signs of changing the way it works it’s appropriate that that we are actively supportive.

Getting these designations is, of course, no guarantee the therapies will ultimately prove to be successful. But if they are, creating faster pathways means they can get to patients, the people who really need them, at a much faster pace.