Stem cell stories that caught our eye: getting the right cell, an energy booster, history of controversy and a fun video

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Light used to direct stem cell fate. Stem cells respond to a symphony of cellular signals telling them to remain stem cells or to mature into a specific type of tissue. Much of stem cell biology today has researchers hitting various notes in various rhythms until the score produces a reasonable percentage of the desired tissue.

It’s often a rather discordant process because the cell is not a simple keyboard. A team at the University of California, San Francisco, has used a neat light trick to make the music a little easier to understand. They started with two known facts: that the protein made by the BRN2 gene can drive stem cells to become nerves and that the gene is often turned on in stem cells and they ignore it, choosing to remain stem cells. The UCSF team genetically engineered mouse stem cells so that they could turn on the BRN2 gene with light.

They found that the gene could only drive the production of nerve cells when it was turned on for a relatively long time. They then discovered that the stem cells were responding to another note in the score, a protein that kept the cells in the stem cell state but became depleted after a prolonged period of BRN2 expression.

“There’s lots of promise that we can do these miraculous things like tissue repair or even growing new organs, but in practice, manipulating stem cells has been notoriously noisy, inefficient, and difficult to control,” said Mather Thomson, one of the senior authors on the paper published in Cell Systems and quoted in a university press release widely picked up, including by News Medical. “I think it’s because the cell is not a puppet. It’s an agent that is constantly interpreting information, like a brain. If we want to precisely manipulate cell fate, we have to understand the information-processing mechanisms in the cell that control how it responds to the things we’re trying to do to it.”

Stem cells delivering engines. Jan Nolte, one of our grantees at the University of California, Davis, and editor of the journal Stem Cells, likes to refer to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as little ambulances that rush emergency medical kits to sites of injury. These stem cells that normally hang out in the bone marrow can generate bone, cartilage and blood vessels, but also can deliver a number of chemicals that either tamp down inflammation or summons other repair cells to the scene. The Scientist published a good overview on how MSCs deliver a key repair tool: mitochondria, known as the powerhouse of cells, to cells in need of an energy boost.

Mitochondria are very susceptible to stressors like a heart attack and often are the first parts of a cell to succumb to the stress. While researchers have known for a decade that MSCs can deliver mitochondria to cells, they haven’t known how this happens. They are rapidly gathering that knowledge hoping they to find better ways to harness that particular MSC skill for therapy.

The author walks through a number of discoveries over the past couple years that have begun to paint a picture of this paramedic skill. She also briefly discusses some potential therapies that have been tested in animals.

Embryonic stem cell controversy waning. Pacific Standard, which has become my favorite “thought” magazine even though I have never seen a print copy, published a pretty thorough overview of the early controversy about embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the many recent scientific advances that may make them unnecessary. The author closes with the fact that for now, advancing those alternatives requires the continued use of ESCs.

Leading with the George W. Bush quote about ESCs being “the leading edge of a series of moral hazards,” he goes on to note that the controversy drove the creation of CIRM and helped Democrats take control of the Senate in 2006. But the bulk of the piece focuses on the alternatives starting with the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of reprogramed adult cells called induced pluripotent stem cells that mimic ESCs. It also covers most recent advances in converting one type of adult cell directly into another type of tissue.

The author closes with a caveat on the ongoing importance of ESCs, at least for now.

“The controversy isn’t over quite yet though—while the newer techniques are immediately useful in research, they have yet to yield any therapies. And because embryonic stem cells are useful for studying how different types of cells develop naturally in the body, they still play an important role in ongoing biomedical research.”

However, he does suggest that eventually, technology will end this controversy.

NOVA video on imagingNOVA video on the brain. Alright, this video only tangentially relates to stem cells and only mentions them toward the end. But it does get at one of the pressing problems in advancing our field: actually seeing what stem cells do at the cell-to-cell and molecular level.

If you are even a casual fan of science, how can you not like a video that starts out with two young scientists using phrases like, “crazy idea,” “wild dream” and “told we’re wasting our time.” It even goes on to talk about “your brain on diapers.” It’s got to be worth the five and a half minutes on the NOVA PBS web site.

It let’s two MIT researchers narrate their effort to image the tiniest of cellular interactions in the brain. Since they found limitations in every existing attempt to see smaller detail, they decided to inflate the brain and make the details larger. They did this by adding the same absorbent material found in diapers to thin slices of mouse brain that had different types of tissues dyed in varying colors. When they added water the brain slice swelled expanding the details.

The result: some really cool images and a tool already being used by scientists around the world. It is now called “expansion microscopy.”

Boo-Boos and Stem Cells: New Children’s Book Explains Body’s Healing Process

With two boys under six, scraped elbows and knees are a common sight in my household. After the crying and tears subside, the excitement of deciding between the Captain America or the Lightning McQueen band aid soon follows.

The fun part of getting a boo-boo: choosing bandaids

The fun part of getting a boo-boo: choosing bandaids

Over those next several days, my boys get a thrill out of peeking at their boo-boos as they gradually heal. And I get giddy about using their minor injuries as an excuse to tell them about the amazing role stem cells play in helping the body heal. But have you ever tried to discuss the cellular and molecular processes of wound healing and tissue regeneration to little kids? It’s a bit tricky to say the least.

Fortunately, a new resource has come to my rescue. Carlo and the Orange Glasses is an imaginative children’s picture book about a boy who gets a cut on his leg and, with the help of his older sister, learns how his body repairs itself. In the story, Carlo uses a magical pair of glasses, the Zoom3000, that lets him witness his stem cells in action as they help mend his skin. You can read the interactive online book here:

Vanessa de Mello, a PhD student at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, wrote and illustrated the book during an internship at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine (MRC) also in Scotland. The MRC currently hosts Carlo and the Orange Glasses on EuroStemCell, a fabulous website and program whose mission is “to help European citizens make sense of stem cells.”

In a post last week on the EuroStemCell website, de Mello explained her goal for the book:

Vanessa De Mello

Vanessa De Mello

“The book itself is intended for children around the ages of 8-10. Carlo and the Orange Glasses gives an overview of wound healing, definitions of cells, tissues and stem cells in an imaginative way. I hope for the book to be fun, easy to read and pull more young minds into science.”

I put the book to the test by reading it to my almost six-year-old. He really liked the colorful drawings and when I asked him what the book meant to him, he said:

Ezra_StemCellBook-0669 copy

Carlo and the Orange Glasses helped my
5 year old son, Ezra, learn about stem cells.

“Stem cells are the most important cells in your body because they fix
your boo-boos and help you to grow.”

Based on that response, I’d say Vanessa’s book is a smashing success!

I think making this complex scientific concept accessible and entertaining for very young kids is so important. It helps instill an appreciation for science that they’ll carry on to adulthood. Who knows how many will eventually go on to careers in regenerative medicine and stem cell science. But they all have the potential to become stem cell ambassadors to ensure this field fulfills its promise to bring treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

Bye Bye BORIS: Gene Silencing Gives Cancer Stem Cells the Boot

A popular theory behind why cancer tumors recur post treatment is the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells have stem cell-like qualities and are stubbornly resistant to common cancer cell killing techniques such as radiation and chemotherapy. CSCs are resilient and can reproduce themselves after all other cancer cells die off, creating new tumors and causing cancer relapse.

930px-Cancer_stem_cells_text_resized

Cancer stem cells are resistant to typical cancer therapies and can cause tumor relapse.

The origin of CSCs and whether they exist in all types of cancers are questions that are still up for debate. However, it seems that the cancer field has come to a consensus that CSCs do exist in many forms of cancer, and that they are a prime target for the development of new cancer therapies. Researchers hope to develop combination therapies that target regular cancer cells and CSCs. Because what’s the use of treating tumors with drugs if they will just grow back because of pesky CSCs?

There are many proposed strategies for killing cancer stem cells. Some of them center around overcoming life-extending features that CSCs have evolved including the ability to avoid normal cell death processes. One promising technology for targeting CSCs is gene silencing. This technique uses tools that turn off the expression of specific genes (hence the silencing) that are causing cancer cells to survive or divide.

Two independent groups recently announced positive results from studies that use gene silencing technology to kill breast and colon cancer stem cells. These two stories are a great example of how pre-clinical biology from academia can translate into clinical research in industry.

On the Academic Side

A group from Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland reported in PloS One that silencing the expression of a gene called BORIS prevented the growth of breast and colon CSCs.

BORIS inhibits the function of an important tumor suppressor gene called CTCF. A tumor suppressor gene acts as a stop sign and prevents normal cells from turning into cancer cells. When tumor suppressors can’t do their normal job due to rogue jay-walkers like BORIS, normal cells lose an important line of defense and can turn into cancer cells. Typically, BORIS is only expressed in germ cells during development and not in adult cells in the body. However, scientists have found that BORIS is reactivated in some cancer cells, typically in CSCs.

The PLoS study confirmed that BORIS was reactivated in both breast and colon CSCs. One hallmark of CSCs is their ability to survive in 3D culture systems by forming sphere-like structures. They then asked whether silencing BORIS expression in breast and colon CSCs would prevent the formation of spheres in culture. They found that without BORIS, CSCs could no longer form spheres and survive in suspension. They went on to show that when BORIS is silenced, expression of stem cell and CSC genes was reduced in both the breast and colon CSCs. The authors concluded that BORIS is an important gene for CSC survival and “could be a potential new CSC biomarker that could be used as a therapeutic target for cancer therapy.”

BORIS is expressed in breast cancer stem cells (red) but not in breast cancer cells (blue).

BORIS is expressed in breast cancer stem cells (red) but not in breast cancer cells (blue). (Alberti et al. 2015)

On the Industry Side

Regen BioPharma reported on Monday that it successfully used gene silencing technology to kill colon CSCs by silencing BORIS expression. Their positive results have prompted the company to improve and advance its gene-silencing techniques so that it can file an IND (investigational new drug) application for the BORIS gene silencing technology. An IND with the Food and Drug Administration is the final step to beginning a clinical trial in humans.

Regen has published previously in this area and acknowledged the recent findings published in PLoS. In a press release, Thomas Ichim, CSO of Regen said:

From 2006-2008, together with a team of scientists from the Institute of Molecular Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, we published that vaccinating against BORIS results in immune response against and tumor regression in breast cancer, melanoma, and glioma.  Subsequently, we published that gene silencing of BORIS can be utilized to selectively kill breast cancer cells. As we saw in the recent publication, the role of BORIS as an “Achilles Heel” of cancer is becoming more and more apparent.  We are currently in the process of advancing our gene-silencing based approaches, in part by leveraging lessons we are learning during dCellVax development, in order to file an IND for BORIS gene silencing technology.

 

Big Picture

the boot

Silencing BORIS gives cancer stem cells the boot. (Image source: Glassdoor.com)

The issue with chemotherapies and other cancer treatments is that tumors become resistant to them over time. Gene silencing offers an advantage over these strategies by directly targeting CSCs, which are resistant to first-line cancer treatments. By silencing genes in CSCs that are required for cancer cell survival and metastasis, scientists can target tumors at their source. For patients with aggressive or recurring cancers, BORIS gene silencing technology could be what the doctor will order to prevent future relapse or metastasis. Time will tell, but hopefully gene silencing technologies against CSCs will enter clinical trials sooner than later.


Related links:

Cell mate: the man who makes stem cells for clinical trials

When we announced that one of the researchers we fund – Dr. Henry Klassen at the University of California, Irvine – has begun his clinical trial to treat the vision-destroying disease retinitis pigmentosa, we celebrated the excitement felt by the researchers and the hope from people with the disease.

But we missed out one group. The people who make the cells that are being used in the treatment. That’s like praising a champion racecar driver for their skill and expertise, and forgetting to mention the people who built the car they drive.

Prof. Gerhard Bauer

Prof. Gerhard Bauer

In this case the “car” was built by the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) team, led by Prof. Gerhard Bauer, at the University of California Davis (UC Davis).

Turns out that Gerhard and his team have been involved in more than just one clinical trial and that the work they do is helping shape stem cell research around the U.S. So we decided to get the story behind this work straight from the horse’s mouth (and if you want to know why that’s a particularly appropriate phrase to use here read this previous blog about the origins of GMP)

When did the GMP facility start, what made you decide this was needed at UC Davis?

Gerhard: In 2006 the leadership of the UC Davis School of Medicine decided that it would be important for UC Davis to have a large enough manufacturing facility for cellular and gene therapy products, as this would be the only larger academic GMP facility in Northern CA, creating an important resource for academia and also industry. So, we started planning the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures and large GMP facility with a team of facility planners, architects and scientists, and by 2007 we had our designs ready and applied for the CIRM major facilities grant, one of the first big grants CIRM offered. We were awarded the grant and started construction in 2008. We opened the Institute and GMP facility in April of 2010.

How does it work? Do you have a number of different cell lines you can manufacture or do people come to you with cell lines they want in large numbers?

Gerhard: We perform client driven manufacturing, which means the clients tell us what they need manufactured. We will, in conjunction with the client, obtain the starting product, for instance cells that need to undergo a manufacturing process to become the final product. These cells can be primary cells or also cell lines. Cell lines may perhaps be available commercially, but often it is necessary to derive the primary cell product here in the GMP facility; this can, for instance, be done from whole donor bone marrow, from apheresis peripheral blood cells, from skin cells, etc.

How many cells would a typical – if there is such a thing – order request?

Gerhard: This depends on the application and can range from 1 million cells to several billions of cells. For instance, for an eye clinical trial using autologous (from the patient themselves) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, a small number, such as a million cells may be sufficient. For allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) cell banks that are required to treat many patients in a clinical trial, several billion cells would be needed. We therefore need to be able to immediately and adequately adjust to the required manufacturing scale.

Why can’t researchers just make their own cells in their own lab or company?

Gerhard: For clinical trial products, there are different, higher, standards than apply for just research laboratory products. There are federal regulations that guide the manufacturing of products used in clinical trials, in this special case, cellular products. In order to produce such products, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) rules and regulations, and guidelines laid down by both the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the United States Pharmacopeia need to be followed.

The goal is to manufacture a safe, potent and non-contaminated product that can be safely used in people. If researchers would like to use the cells or cell lines they developed in a clinical trial they have to go to a GMP manufacturer so these products can actually be used clinically. If, however, they have their own GMP facility they can make those products in house, provided of course they adhere to the rules and regulations for product manufacturing under GMP conditions.

Besides the UC Irvine retinitis pigmentosa trial now underway what other kinds of clinical trials have you supplied cells for?

Gerhard: A UC Davis sponsored clinical trial in collaboration with our Eye Center for the treatment of blindness (NCT01736059), which showed remarkable vision recovery in two out of the six patients who have been treated to date (Park et al., PMID:25491299, ), and also an industry sponsored clinical gene therapy trial for severe kidney disease. Besides cellular therapy products, we also manufacture clinical grade gene therapy vectors and specialty drug formulations.

For several years we have been supplying clinicians with a UC Davis GMP facility developed formulation of the neuroactive steroid “allopregnanolone” that was shown to act on resident neuronal stem cells. We saved several lives of patients with intractable seizures, and the formulation is also applied in clinical trials for the treatment of traumatic brain injury, Fragile X syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease.

What kinds of differences are you seeing in the industry, in the kinds of requests you get now compared to when you started?

Gerhard: In addition, gene therapy vector manufacturing and formulation work is really needed by several clients. One of the UC Davis specialties is “next generation” gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells, and we are contacted often to develop those products.

Where will we be in five years?

Gerhard: Most likely, some of the Phase I/II clinical trials (these are early stage clinical trials with, usually, relatively small numbers of patients involved) will have produced encouraging results, and product manufacturing will need to be scaled up to provide enough cellular products for Phase III clinical trials (much larger trials with many more people) and later for a product that can be licensed and marketed.

We are already working with companies that anticipate such scale up work and transitioning into manufacturing for marketing; we are planning this upcoming process with them. We also believe that certain cellular products will replace currently available standard medical treatments as they may turn out to produce superior results.

What does the public not know about the work you do that you think they should know?

Gerhard: The public should know that UC Davis has the largest academic Good Manufacturing Practice Facility in Northern California, that its design was well received by the FDA, that we are manufacturing a wide variety of products – currently about 16 – that we are capable of manufacturing several products at one time without interfering with each other, and that we are happy to work with clients from both academia and private industry through both collaborative and Fee-for-Service arrangements.

We are also very proud to have, during the last 5 years, contributed to saving several lives with some of the novel products we manufactured. And, of course, we are extremely grateful to CIRM for building this state-of-the-art facility.

You can see a video about the building of the GMP facility at UC Davis here.

Study Identifies Safer Stem Cell Therapies

To reject or not reject, that is the question facing the human immune system when new tissue or cells are transplanted into the body.

Stem cell-therapy promises hope for many debilitating diseases that currently have no cures. However, the issue of immune rejection has prompted scientists to carefully consider how to develop safe stem cell therapies that will be tolerated by the human immune system.

Before the dawn of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were suggested as a potential source for transplantable cells and tissue. However, ESCs run into a couple of issues, including their origin, and the fact that ESC-derived cells likely would be rejected when transplanted into most areas of a human due to differences in genetic backgrounds.

The discovery of iPSCs in the early 2000’s gave new hope to the field of stem cell therapy. By generating donor cells and tissue from a patient’s own iPSCs, transplanting those cells/tissue back into the same individual shouldn’t – at least theoretically – cause an immune reaction. This type of transplantation is called “autologous” meaning that the stem cell-derived cells have the same genetic background as the person.

Unfortunately, scientists have run up against a roadblock in iPSC-derived stem cell therapy. They discovered that even cells derived from a patient’s own iPSCs can cause an immune reaction when transplanted into that patient. The answers as to why this occurs remained largely unanswered until recently.

In a paper published last week in Cell Stem Cell, scientists from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) reported that different mature cell types derived from human iPSCs have varying immunogenic effects (the ability to cause an immune reaction) when transplanted into “humanized” mice that have a human immune system. This study along with the research conducted to generate the humanized mice was funded by CIRM grants (here, here).

In this study, retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) and skeletal muscle cells (SMC) derived from human iPSCs were transplanted into humanized mice. RPEs were tolerated by the immune system while SMCs were rejected. (Adapted from Zhao et al. 2015)

Scientists took normal mice and replaced their immune system with a human one. They then took human iPSCs generated from the same human tissue used to generate the humanized mice and transplanted different cell types derived from the iPSCs cells into these mice.

Because they were introducing cells derived from the same source of human tissue that the mouse’s immune system was derived from, in theory, the mice should not reject the transplant. However, they found that many of the transplants did indeed cause an immune reaction.

Interestingly, they found that certain mature cell types derived from human iPSCs created a substantial immune reaction while other cell types did not. The authors focused on two specific cell types, smooth muscle cells (SMC) and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE), to get a closer look at what was going on.

iPSC-derived smooth muscle cells created a large immune response when transplanted into humanized mice. However, when they transplanted iPSC-derived retinal epithelial cells (found in the retina of the eye), they didn’t see the same immune reaction. As a control, they transplanted RPE cells made from human ESCs, and as expected, they saw an immune response to the foreign ESC-derived RPE cells.

RPE_1

iPSC derived RPE cells (green) do not cause an immune reaction (red) after transplantation into humanized mice while H9 embryonic stem cell derived RPE cells do. (Zhao et al. 2015)

When they looked further to determine why the humanized mice rejected the muscle cells but accepted the retinal cells, they found that SMCs had a different gene expression profile and higher expression of immunogenic molecules. The iPSC-derived RPE cells had low expression of these same immunogenic molecules, which is why they were well tolerated in the humanized mice.

Results from this study suggest that some cell types generated from human iPSCs are safer for transplantation than others, an issue which can be addressed by improving the differentiation techniques used to produce mature cells from iPSCs. This study also suggests that iPSC-derived RPE cells could be a safe and promising stem cell therapy for the treatment of eye disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a degenerative eye disease that can cause vision impairment or blindness and usually affects older people over the age of 50. Currently there is no treatment for AMD, a disease that affects approximately 50 million people around the world. (However there is a human iPSC clinical trial for AMD out of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan that has treated one patient but is currently on hold due to safety issues.)

The senior author on this study, Dr. Yang Xu, commented on the importance of this study in relation to AMD in a UCSD press release:

Dr. Yang Xu

Dr. Yang Xu

Immune rejection is a major challenge for stem cell therapy. Our finding of the lack of immune rejection of human iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelium cells supports the feasibility of using these cells for treating macular degeneration. However, the inflammatory environment associated with macular degeneration could be an additional hurdle to be overcome for the stem cell therapy to be successful.

Xu makes an important point by acknowledging that iPSC-derived RPE cells aren’t a sure bet for curing AMD just yet. More research needs to be done to address other issues that occur during AMD in order for this type of stem cell therapy to be successful.

 


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Stem cell stories that caught our eye: A groove for healing hearts, model for muscular dystrophy and the ice bucket worked

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

A tight groove could help heal a heart.  We have written several posts with the theme “It takes a village to raise a stem cell.” If you want a stem cell to mature into a desired tissue you have to pay attention to all aspects of its environment—both the chemicals around it and the physical space.

A team at the Imperial College London has provided the latest chapter to this tale. It turns out if you want stem cells to consistently turn into long fibers of heart muscle, besides providing them with the right chemical signals making them grow in long narrow grooves on lab plate also helps. They got a two-fold increase in heart muscle cells compared to stem cells grown on a flat lab plate.

They’re now trying to figure out why the etched silicon chips worked so well for generating heart muscle. The journal Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine published the work and the web portal myScience picked up the university’s press release.

Stem cell model for muscular dystrophy. In the past, when scientists have looked at muscle samples from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) to see why they have the characteristic muscle weakening, they ‘ve arrived at the scene of the crime too late. At that point, the cellular missteps had already occurred and all that is left to observe was the damage.

Healthy muscle cells express dystrophin (green), not cells from DMD patients (middle), but treated stem cells from patients do (right)

Healthy muscle cells express dystrophin (green), not cells from DMD patients (middle), but treated stem cells from patients do (right)

So, a team at Kyoto University reprogrammed a patient’s cells to create iPS type stem cells. They then used genetic cues to direct the stem cells to become muscle and watched to see how what went wrong as this process happened.

“Our model allows us to use the same genetic background to study the early stage of pathogenesis which was not possible in the past,” said first author Emi Shoji.

The research published in Scientific Reports and highlighted in a university press release picked up by MedicalXpress documented the level of inappropriate influx of calcium into the cells and showed that a specific cell surface receptor channel was to blame. That receptor will now become a target for new drug therapy for DMD pateints.

Ice bucket results.  The ALS Association raised $220 million in the past year for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, by getting people to dump bucket of ice water over their heads and then make a donation. More important, in just a year a major paper funded by the proceeds of the ice bucket challenge has shown a defect in the nerves of ALS patients and shown that correcting the defect makes the cells healthier. Those are pretty fast results for science.

In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science a team at Johns Hopkins found that one protein, TDP-43, was not doing its job well. When they genetically modified stem cell from ALS patients to correct that defect the cells worked properly. YahooFinance ran a story about the challenge and the new research.

“If we are able to mimic TDP-43’s function in the human neurons of ALS patients, there’s a good chance that we could slow down progression of the disease!” said Jonathan Ling, a researcher on the team. “And that’s what we’re putting all our efforts into right now.”

Of the initial $115 million raised during the early months of the challenge, 67 percent went to research, 20 percent to patient services, and nine percent to public and professional education. Just four percent went to overhead costs of fund raising.

China says it’s cracking down on clinics. I spend a considerable amount of time suggesting callers to our agency be very cautious about considering spending large sums of money to go overseas to get unregulated and unproven stem cell treatment. So, I was pleased to read this morning’s news that China’s top health authority issued regulation to control some of the most questionable clinics.

The regulations reported in China Daily note that any treatments using stem cells for conditions other than proven uses in blood diseases would be considered experimental and could only be conducted in approved hospitals. It noted conditions touted by clinics there including epilepsy, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury and autism.

“Only eligible hospitals can perform the practice as a clinical trial for research purpose and it must not be charged or advertised. Anyone caught breaking the rules will be punished according to the new regulation,” said Zhang Linming, a senior official of the science and technology department of the commission.

Throwback Thursday: Progress to a Cure for ALS

Welcome to our new “Throwback Thursday” (TBT) series. CIRM’s Stem Cellar blog has a rich archive of stem cell content that is too valuable to let dust bunnies take over.  So we decided to brush off some of our older, juicy stories and see what advancements in stem cell research science have been made since!

ALS is also called Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the famous American baseball player.

ALS is also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, named after the famous American baseball player.

This week, we’ll discuss an aggressive neurodegenerative disease called Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or ALS. You’re probably more familiar with its other name, Lou Gehrig’s disease. Gehrig was a famous American Major League baseball player who took the New York Yankees to six world championships. He had a gloriously successful career that was sadly cut short by ALS. Post diagnosis, Gehrig’s physical performance quickly deteriorated, and he had to retire from a sport for which he was considered an American hero. He passed away only a year later, at the young age of 37, after he succumbed to complications caused by ALS.

A year ago, we published an interesting blog on this topic. Let’s turn back the clock and take a look at what happened in ALS research in 2014.

TBT: Disease in a Dish – Using Human Stem Cells to Find ALS Treatments

This blog featured the first of our scintillating “Stem Cells in Your face” video series called “Treating ALS with a Disease in a Dish.” Here is an excerpt:

Our latest video Disease in a Dish: That’s a Mouthful takes a lighthearted approach to help clear up any head scratching over this phrase. Although it’s injected with humor, the video focuses on a dreadful disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, it’s a disorder in which nerve cells that control muscle movement die. There are no effective treatments and it’s always fatal, usually within 3 to 5 years after diagnosis.

To explain disease in a dish, the video summarizes a Science Translation Medicine publication of CIRM-funded research reported by the laboratory of Robert Baloh, M.D., Ph.D., director of Cedars-Sinai’s multidisciplinary ALS Program. In the study, skin cells from patients with an inherited form of ALS were used to create nerve cells in a petri dish that exhibit the same genetic defects found in the neurons of ALS patients. With this disease in a dish, the team identified a possible cause of the disease: the cells overproduce molecules causing a toxic buildup that affects neuron function. The researchers devised a way to block the toxic buildup, which may point to a new therapeutic strategy.

New Stem Cell Discoveries in ALS Make Progress to Finding a Cure

So what’s happened in the field of ALS research in the past year? I’m happy to report that a lot has been accomplished to better understand this disease and to develop potential cures! Here are a few highlights that we felt were worth mentioning:

  • The Ice Bucket Challenge launched by the ALS Association is raising awareness and funds for ALS research.

    The Ice Bucket Challenge launched by the ALS Association is raising awareness and funds for ALS research.

    Ice Bucket Challenge. The ALS Association launched the “world’s largest global social media phenomenon” by encouraging brave individuals to dump ice-cold water on their heads to raise awareness and funds for research into treatments and cures for ALS. This August, the ALS Association re-launched the Ice Bucket Challenge campaign in efforts to raise additional funds and to make this an annual event.

  • ALS Gene Mapping. In a story released yesterday, the global biotech company Biogen is partnering with Columbia University Medical Center to map ALS disease genes. An article from Bloomberg Business describes how using Ice Bucket Money to create “a genetic map of the disease may help reveal the secrets of a disorder that’s not well understood, including how much a person’s genes contribute to the likelihood of developing ALS.” Biogen is also launching a clinical trial for a new ALS drug candidate by the end of the year.
  • New Drug target for ALS. Our next door neighbors at the Gladstone Institutes here in San Francisco published an exciting new finding in the journal PNAS in June. In collaboration with scientists at the University of Michigan, they discovered a new therapeutic target for ALS. They found that a protein called hUPF1 was able to protect brain cells from ALS-induced death by preventing the accumulation of toxic proteins in these cells. In a Gladstone press release, senior author Steve Finkbeiner said, “This is the first time we’ve been able to link this natural monitoring system to neurodegenerative disease. Leveraging this system could be a strategic therapeutic target for diseases like ALS and frontotemporal dementia.”
  • Stem cells, ALS, and clinical trials. Clive Svendsen at Cedars-Sinai is using gene therapy and stem cells to develop a cure for ALS. His team is currently working in mice to determine the safety and effectiveness of the treatment, but they hope to move into clinical trials with humans by the end of the year. For more details, check out our blog Genes + Cells: Stem Cells deliver genes as drugs and hope for ALS.

These are only a few of the exciting and promising stories that have come out in the past year. It’s encouraging and comforting to see, however, that progress towards a cure for ALS is definitely moving forward.

Alzheimer’s Nightmare Spurs Comedy Fundraiser to Help Caregivers – New Video

You could have heard a pin drop in the auditorium. The audience of young stem cell researchers was gripped by every word of Lauren Miller’s heartbreaking story about the impact that Alzheimer’s disease has had on her family. Only a child when her grandfather was diagnosed with and later died of Alzheimer’s, she mistook his symptoms, like repeating stories over and over, as his way of making her laugh.

Lauren was fifteen and much more aware of the brutality of the disease when her grandmother, the vibrant family matriarch, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and soon, ”stopped talking, stopped walking and eventually curled up in a ball and stayed that way for the last, many months of her life.”

Miller, a screenwriter and film actress, is the Alzheimer’s patient advocate member of CIRM’s Board. Last month, she was the opening speaker at the 2015 CIRM Bridges Trainee Meeting, a two-day event which showcases the work of undergraduate and Master’s level students who, through the support of the Bridges program, conducted stem cell research at world class research institutes in California. This video recording of Lauren’s talk is a great watch but keep a hanky near by:

Her presentation clearly resonated with the students, likely because their internships were mostly centered around the laboratory bench, and Lauren’s story provided a personal, first-hand account of a disease that could one day be treated by stem cell-based therapies. Also, Lauren was just about their age when, sadly, she first realized that her mom was showing the signs of early onset Alzheimer’s. Her memory of this moment is crushing:

“I first noticed it the weekend of my college graduation. She told me the same stories a few times and deep down inside I was devastated. I said nothing to anyone. Maybe if I pretended it didn’t happen, it wouldn’t be real. Maybe it was a one-time thing and it would just go away. Of course, it didn’t go away.”

Out of this darkness, Lauren has become a source of unwavering support for other families and caregivers who are beaten down by this disease on a daily basis. She and her husband Seth Rogen founded Hilarity for Charity which she says aims, “to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s among young adults and to support those who are going through it.” In only three and a half years, Hilarity for Charity has raised almost $3 million. Recently they launched a partnership with Home Instead Senior Care and in the past six months have funded 8000 hours of free at home care to give Alzheimer’s caregivers a much needed break. For me, one of the most poignant sections of Lauren’s talk is when she read a note from one of the recipients of these grants:

“The words, ‘thank you’, just don’t seem to be enough to express my heartfelt appreciation. I’ve barely been out of Sue’s sight since 2006 and our world has shrunk to the size of her bedroom and bath with conversations from babbling to hysteria. Please accept my total gratitude for this chance to join humanity again.”

At CIRM, our Board has awarded close to $55 million to stem cell related Alzheimer’s research. These cutting edge research projects aim to gain a better understanding of the disease and to progress stem cell-based treatments into clinical trials. Here’s hoping for an accelerated cure for Alzheimer’s to end the suffering of both patients and caregivers.


Related Links:

Stories of Hope: Lauren Miller
Stories of Hope: Dick Mora
CIRM Alzheimer’s Disease Program Fact Sheet
Video: Alzheimer’s Stem Cell Research: Ask the Expert – Larry Goldstein, UCSD
Video: Neural Stem Cells Reverse Alzheimer’s-Like Symptoms

New Regenerative Liver Cells Identified

It’s common knowledge that your liver is a champion when it comes to regeneration. It’s actually one of the few internal organs in the human body that can robustly regenerate itself after injury. Other organs such as the heart and lungs do not have the same regenerative response and instead generate scar tissue to protect the injured area. Liver regeneration is very important to human health as the liver conducts many fundamental processes such as making proteins, breaking down toxic substances, and making new chemicals required to digest your food.

The human liver.

The human liver

Over the years, scientists have suggested multiple theories for why the liver has this amazing regenerative capacity. What’s known for sure is that mature hepatocytes (the main cell type in the liver) will respond to injury by dividing and proliferating to make more hepatocytes. In this way, the liver can regrow up to 70% of itself within a matter of a few weeks. Pretty amazing right?

So what is the source of these regenerative hepatocytes? It was originally thought that adult liver stem cells (called oval cells) were the source, but this theory has been disproved in the past few years. The answer to this million-dollar question, however, likely comes from a study published last week in the journal Cell.

Hybrid hepatocytes (shown in green) divide and regenerate the liver in response to injury. (Image source: Font-Burgada et al., 2015)

Hybrid hepatocytes (green) divide and regenerate the liver in response to injury. (Image source: Font-Burgada et al., 2015)

A group at UCSD led by Dr. Michael Karin reported a new population of liver cells called “hybrid hepatocytes”. These cells were discovered in an area of the healthy liver called the portal triad. Using mouse models, the CIRM-funded group found that hybrid hepatocytes respond to chemical-induced injury by massively dividing to replace damaged or lost liver tissue. When they took a closer look at these newly-identified cells, they found that hybrid hepatocytes were very similar to normal hepatocytes but differed slightly with respect to the types of liver genes that they expressed.

A common concern associated with regenerative tissue and cells is the development of cancer. Actively dividing cells in the liver can acquire genetic mutations that can cause hepatocellular carcinoma, a common form of liver cancer.

What makes this group’s discovery so exciting is that they found evidence that hybrid hepatocytes do not cause cancer in mice. They showed this by transplanting a population of hybrid hepatocytes into multiple mouse models of liver cancer. When they dissected the liver tumors from these mice, none of the transplanted hybrid cells were present. They concluded that hybrid hepatocytes are robust and efficient at regenerating the liver in response to injury, and that they are a safe and non-cancer causing source of regenerating liver cells.

Currently, liver transplantation is the only therapy for end-stage liver diseases (often caused by cirrhosis or hepatitis) and aggressive forms of liver cancer. Patients receiving liver transplants from donors have a good chance of survival, however donated livers are in short supply, and patients who actually get liver transplants have to take immunosuppressant drugs for the rest of their lives. Stem cell-derived liver tissue, either from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), has been proposed as an alternative source of transplantable liver tissue. However, safety of iPSC-derived tissue for clinical applications is still being addressed due to the potential risk of tumor formation caused by iPSCs that haven’t fully matured.

This study gives hope to the future of cell-based therapies for liver disease and avoids the current hurdles associated with iPSC-based therapy. In a press release from UCSD, Dr. Karin succinctly summarized the implications of their findings.

“Hybrid hepatocytes represent not only the most effective way to repair a diseased liver, but also the safest way to prevent fatal liver failure by cell transplantation.”

This exciting and potentially game-changing research was supported by CIRM funding. The first author, Dr. Joan Font-Burgada, was a CIRM postdoctoral scholar from 2012-2014. He reached out to CIRM regarding his publication and provided the following feedback:

CIRM Postdoctoral Fellow Jean Font-Burgada

CIRM postdoctoral scholar Joan Font-Burgada

“I’m excited to let you know that work CIRM funded through the training program will be published in Cell. I would like to express my most sincere gratitude for the opportunity I was given. I am convinced that without CIRM support, I could not have finished my project. Not only the training was excellent but the resources I was offered allowed me to work with enough independence to explore new avenues in my project that finally ended up in this publication.”

 

We at CIRM are always thrilled and proud to hear about these success stories. More importantly, we value feedback from our grantees on how our funding and training has supported their science and helped them achieve their goals. Our mission is to develop stem cell therapies for patients with unmet medical needs, and studies such as this one are an encouraging sign that we are making progress towards to achieving this goal.


Related links:

UCSD Press Release

CIRM Spotlight on Liver Disease Research

CIRM Spotlight on Living with Liver Disease

Researchers cool to idea of ice bath after exercise

Have you ever had a great workout, really pushed your body and muscles hard and thought “You know what would be good right now? A nice plunge into an ice bath.”

No. Me neither.

Weightlifter Karyn Marshall taking an ice bath: Photo courtesy Karyn Marshall

Weightlifter Karyn Marshall taking an ice bath: Photo courtesy Karyn Marshall

But some people apparently believe that taking an ice bath after a hard workout can help their muscles rebound and get stronger.

It’s a mistaken belief, at least according to a new study from researchers at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and the University of Queensland (UQ) in Australia. They are – pardon the pun – giving the cold shoulder to the idea that an ice bath can help hot muscles recover after a hard session of strength training.

The researchers got 21 men who exercise a lot to do strength training twice a week for 12 weeks. One group then agreed – and I’d love to know how they persuaded them to do this – to end the training session by jumping into a 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 Celsius) ice bath. The other group – let’s label them the “sensible brigade” – ended by doing their cool down on an exercise bike.

Happily for the rest of us at the end of the 12 weeks the “sensible brigade” experienced more gains in muscle strength and muscle mass than the cool kids.

So what does this have to do with stem cells? Well the researchers say the reason for this result is because our bodies use so-called satellite cells – which are a kind of muscle stem cell – to help build stronger muscles. When you plunge those muscles into a cold bath you effectively blunt or block the ability of the muscle stem cells to work as well as they normally would.

But the researchers weren’t satisfied just putting that particular theory on ice, so in a second study they took muscle biopsies from men after they had done leg-strengthening exercises. Again, half did an active cool down, the others jumped in the ice bath.

In a news release accompanying the article in the The Journal of Physiology, Dr Llion Roberts, from UQ’s School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, said the results were the same:

“We found that cold water immersion after training substantially attenuated, or reduced, long-term gains in muscle mass and strength. It is anticipated that athletes who use ice baths after workouts would see less long-term muscle gains than those who choose an active warm down.”

The bottom line; if you strain a muscle working out ice is your friend because it’s great for reducing inflammation. If you want to build stronger muscles ice is not your friend. Save it for that nice refreshing beverage you have earned after the workout.

Cheers!