East Coast Company to Sell Research Products Derived from CIRM’s Stem Cell Bank

With patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in hand, any lab scientist can follow recipes that convert these embryonic-like stem cells into specific cell types for studying human disease in a petri dish. iPSCs derived from a small skin sample from a Alzheimer’s patient, for instance, can be specialized into neurons – the kind of cell affected by the disease – to examine what goes wrong in an Alzheimer’s patient’s brain or screen drugs that may alleviate the problems.

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Neurons created from Alzheimer’s disease patient-derived iPSCs.
Image courtesy Elixirgen Scientific

But not every researcher has easy access to a bank of patient-derived iPSCs and it’s not trivial to coax iPSCs to become a particular cell type. The process is also a time sink and many scientists would rather spend that time doing what they’re good at: uncovering new insights into their disease of interest.

Since the discovery of iPSC technology over a decade ago, countless labs have worked out increasingly efficient variations on the original method. In fact, companies that deliver iPSC-derived products have emerged as an attractive option for the time-strapped stem cell researcher.

One of those companies is Elixirgen Scientific of Baltimore, Maryland. Pardon the pun but Elixirgen has turned the process of making various cell types from iPSCs into a science. Here’s how CEO Bumpei Noda described the company’s value to me:

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Bumpei Noda

“Our technology directly changes stem cells into the cells that make up most of your body, such as muscle cells or neural cells, in about one week. Considering that existing technology takes multiple weeks or even months to do the same thing, imagine how much more research can get done than before.”

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With Elixirgen’s technology, different “cocktails” of ingredients can quickly and efficiently turn iPSCs into many different human cell types. Image courtesy Elixirgen Scientific

Their technology is set to become an even greater resource for researchers based on their announcement yesterday that they’ve signed a licensing agreement to sell human disease cells that were generated from CIRM’s iPSC Repository.

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Stephen Lin

“The CIRM Repository holds the largest publicly accessible collection of human iPSCs in the world and is the result of years of coordinated efforts of many groups to create a leading resource for disease modeling and drug discovery using stem cells,” said Stephen Lin, a CIRM Senior Science Officer who oversees the cell bank.

 

The repository currently contains a collection of 1,600 cell lines derived from patients with diseases that are a source of active research, including autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, lung disease, hepatitis C, fatty liver disease, and more (visit our iPSC Repository web page for the complete list).

While this wide variety of patient cells lines certainly played a major role in Elixirgen’s efforts to sign the agreement, Noda also noted that the CIRM Repository “has rich clinical and demographic data and age-matched control cell lines” which is key information to have when interpreting the results of experiments and drug screening.

Lin also points out another advantage to the CIRM cells:

“It’s one of the few collections with a streamlined route to commercialization (i.e. pre-negotiated licenses) that make activities like Elixirgen’s possible. iPSC technology is still under patent and technically cannot be used for drug discovery without those legal safeguards. That’s important because if you do discover a drug using iPSCs without taking care of these licensing agreements, your discovery could be owned by that original intellectual property holder.”

At CIRM, we’re laser-focused on accelerating stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs. That’s why we’re excited that Elixirgen Scientific has licensed access to the our iPSC repository. We’re confident their service will help researchers work more efficiently and, in turn, accelerate the pace of new discoveries.

Stem Cell Tools: Helping Scientists Model Complex Diseases

This blog is part of the Month of CIRM series and the first of two blogs focused on how CIRM-funded infrastructure initiatives are developing useful tools to advance stem cell research. 

Human stem cells are powerful tools for studying human disease.  Animal models like mice have been and continue to be important for studying physiological systems, but they are still different than human systems.  Other types of human cells studied in the lab often are isolated from cancers or modified to multiply indefinitely.  However, the genetic DNA blueprint of these modified cells are irreparably altered from the normal tissues that they came from.

Human pluripotent stem cells are unique in that they can be grown in the lab and turned into any type of normal cell in the body.  Many scientists now believe that creating such stem cell lines from patients and developing ‘disease-in-a-dish’ models will provide important insights that will lead to treatments for the disorders from which they came.  Challenges still remain to develop these models to their fullest potential.  Because the genetics underlying human disease is complex, detailed genetic information about each stem cell line, as well as a large number of lines  to represent the genetic variability between patients will be needed to make progress.

To address this need, CIRM funded the creation of the world’s largest induced pluripotent stem cell bank, which we call the CIRM iPSC Repository.  iPSCs are similar to embryonic stem cells in that they can develop into any cell type found in the body, but they differ in how they are derived. Scientists can take human skin or blood cells and genetically reprogram them into iPSCs that have the same genetic makeup, including any disease-causing mutations, as the person from which the original cells were taken. Embryonic stem cells, on the other hand, are derived from left over embryos donated by couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.

The CIRM iPSC Repository was established to harness the power of iPSCs as tools for disease modeling and drug discovery. The Repository currently offers scientists around the world access to over 1500 high-quality iPSC lines covering diseases of the brain, heart, liver, lung, and eye, and the collection will eventually hold over 3000 lines.  All iPSC lines are linked to publicly-accessible demographic and clinical information.

Making the Cell Lines

Making the iPSC Repository was no easy task – it took a village of doctors, scientists, patients and healthy volunteers. First, clinicians across California collected blood and skin samples from over 2800 people including individuals with common diseases, rare diseases and healthy controls. CIRM then awarded a grant to Cellular Dynamics International to create iPSC lines from these donors, and a second grant to the Coriell Institute to store and distribute the lines to interested labs around the world. Creating such a large number of lines in a single concerted effort has been a challenging logistical feat that has taken almost five years and is projected to finish in early 2018.

Joachim Hallmayer

We spoke with one of the tissue collectors, a scientist named Dr. Joachim Hallmayer at Stanford University, about the effort it took to obtain tissue samples for the Repository. Hallmayer is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford who studies Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in children. With funding from a CIRM Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling award, Hallmayer collected tissue samples from children with ASD and children with normal development. His efforts resulted in the 164 ASD and 134 control samples for the Repository.

Hallmayer emphasized that each sample donation required significant attention and education from the clinical staff to the donor.  Communicating with patients and walking them through the consent process for donating their tissue for this purpose is an extremely important issue that is often overlooked. “Conveying information about the tissue collection process to patients takes a lot of time. However, deconstructing the consent process is essential for patients to understand what they are donating and why,” explained Hallmayer.

Now that the ASD lines are available, Hallmayer and his colleague Dr. Ruth O’Hara are formulating a plan to model ASD in a dish by differentiating the iPSC lines into neurons affected by this disorder. Says O’Hara:

Ruth O’Hara

“While the examination of live tissue from other organ systems has become increasingly viable, examining live neurons from patients with brain disorders has simply not been possible. Using iPSC-derived neurons, for the first time we can study live nerve cells from actual patients and compare these cells to those from humans without the disorder.”

Using iPSCs to Model Psychiatric Disorders

Ultimately, the goal of iPSCs for modeling disease is to identify mechanisms and therapeutic targets for the disorders that they represent.  Studying a disease through a single iPSC line may not shed enough light on that disorder.  Just as people have diverse traits, the way that a disease can affect individuals is also diverse.  Studying large numbers of lines in a time and cost-efficient manner that represent these diverse traits, and the genetic causes that underlie them, can be a powerful method to understand and address diseases.

 To leverage the iPSC collection for this purpose, CIRM and a group of scientists at the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research and Harvard University have entered into a collaboration to study psychiatric disorders such as ASD.  Because the donor samples were collected on the basis of clinical information, the genetic information about what caused their disease remains unknown.  Therefore, the Stanley Center will embark on whole genome sequencing (WGS) of hundreds of lines from the CIRM iPSC repository. Adding donor WGS sequence information to the CIRM repository will significantly increase its value, as scientists will be able to use DNA sequence information to select the ideal lines for disease modeling and therapeutic discovery efforts. The collaboration aims to identify the genes that shape neuronal phenotypes in iPSC-derived neurons from patients with psychiatric disorders.

“A central challenge today is to discover how inherited genetic variation gives rise to functional variation in the properties of neurons and other cells,” said Steven McCarroll, Director of Genetics at the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, and associate professor at Harvard Medical School’s Department of Genetics. “We hope with the analysis of cells from very large numbers of genetically diverse individuals will begin to address longstanding problems at the interface of human genetics and biology.”

iPSC derived neurons growing in a dish. (Image courtesy of Ralda Nehme, Research Scientist at the Broad Institute).

Such efforts require technologies such as Drop-seq, developed in the McCarroll lab, where genome-wide expression of thousands of separate cells can be analyzed in one experiment. These efforts also rely on scaling functional analysis of stem cell-based disease models, a vexing bottleneck for the field. “The CIRM iPSC Repository is the largest and most ambitious of its kind”, said Kevin Eggan, Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology at Harvard University, and Director of Stem Cell Biology at the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research. Efforts underway in Dr. Eggan’s lab are directed at developing approaches to analyze large numbers of stem cell lines in parallel.

“The scale of the CIRM iPSC collection will allow us to investigate how variation that is common among many of us predisposes certain individuals to major mental illnesses such as autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. We are incredibly excited about entering this long-term collaboration.”

Members of the Eggan and McCarroll labs at the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research. (Image courtesy of Kiki Lilliehook)

From Cell Lines to Data

It’s clear from these stories, that the iPSC Repository is a unique and powerful tool for the stem cell research community. But for the rewards to be truly reaped, more tools are needed that will help scientists study these cell lines. This is where the CIRM Genomics Initiative comes into play.

Be sure to read Part 2 of our Stem Cell Tools series tomorrow to find out how our Genomics Initiative is funding the development of genomic and bioinformatics tools that will allow scientists to decipher complex stem cell data all the way from mapping the developmental states of cells to predicting the accuracy of stem cell-based models.

This blog was written in collaboration with Dr. Kiki Lilliehook, the Manager of the Stem Cell Program at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Building California’s stem cell research community, from the ground up

For week three of the Month of CIRM, our topic is infrastructure. What is infrastructure? Read on for a big picture overview and then we’ll fill in the details over the course of the week.

When CIRM was created in 2001, our goal was to grow the stem cell research field in California. But to do that, we first had to build some actual buildings. Since then, our infrastructure programs have taken on many different forms, but all have been focused on a single mission – helping accelerate stem cell research to patients with unmet medical needs.
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In the early 2000’s, stem cell scientists faced a quandary. President George W. Bush had placed limits on how federal funds could be used for embryonic stem cell research. His policy allowed funding of research involving some existing embryonic stem cell lines, but banned research that developed or conducted research on new stem lines.

Many researchers felt the existing lines were not the best quality and could only use them in a limited capacity. But because they were dependent on the government to fund their work, had no alternative but to comply. Scientists who chose to use non-approved lines were unable to use their federally funded labs for stem cell work.

The creation of CIRM changed that. In 2008, CIRM launched its Major Facilities Grant Program. The program had two major goals:

1) To accommodate the growing numbers of stem cell researchers coming in California as a result of CIRM’s grants and funding.

2) To provide new research space that didn’t have to comply with the federal restrictions on stem cell research.

Over the next few years, the program invested $271million to help build 12 new research facilities around California from Sacramento to San Diego. The institutions used CIRM’s funding to leverage and attract an additional $543 million in funds from private donors and institutions to construct and furnish the buildings.

These world-class laboratories gave scientists the research space they needed to work with any kind of stem cell they wanted and develop new potential therapies. It also enabled the institutions to bring together under one roof, all the stem cell researchers, who previously had been scattered across each campus.

One other important benefit was the work these buildings provided for thousands of construction workers at a time of record unemployment in the industry. Here’s a video about the 12 facilities we helped build:

But building physical facilities was just our first foray into developing infrastructure. We were far from finished.

In the early days of stem cell research, many scientists used cells from different sources, created using different methods. This meant it was often hard to compare results from one study to another. So, in 2013 CIRM created an iPSC Repository, a kind of high tech stem cell bank. The repository collected tissue samples from people who have different diseases, turned those samples into high quality stem cell lines – the kind known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) – and then made those samples available to researchers around the world. This not only gave researchers a powerful resource to use in developing a deeper understanding of different diseases, but because the scientists were all using the same cell lines that meant their findings could be compared to each other.

That same year we also launched a plan to create a new, statewide network of clinics that specialize in using stem cells to treat patients. The goal of the Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network is to support and accelerate clinical trials for programs funded by the agency, academic researchers or industry. We felt that because stem cell therapies are a completely new way of treating diseases and disorders, we needed a completely new way of delivering treatments in a safe and effective manner.

The network began with three clinics – UC San Diego, UCLA/UC Irvine, and City of Hope – but at our last Board meeting was expanded to five with the addition of UC Davis and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland. This network will help the clinics streamline challenging processes such as enrolling patients, managing regulatory procedures and sharing data and will speed the testing and distribution of experimental stem cell therapies. We will be posting a more detailed blog about how our Alpha Clinics are pushing innovative stem cell treatments tomorrow.

As the field advanced we knew that we had to find a new way to help researchers move their research out of the lab and into clinical trials where they could be tested in people. Many researchers were really good at the science, but had little experience in navigating the complex procedures needed to get the green light from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to test their work in a clinical trial.

So, our Agency created the Translating (TC) and Accelerating Centers (AC). The idea was that the TC would help researchers do all the preclinical testing necessary to apply for permission from the FDA to start a clinical trial. Then the AC would help the researchers set up the trial and actually run it.

In the end, one company, Quintiles IMS, won both awards so we combined the two entities into one, The Stem Cell Center, a kind of one-stop-shopping home to help researchers move the most promising treatments into people.

That’s not the whole story of course – I didn’t even mention the Genomics Initiative – but it’s hard to cram 13 years of history into a short blog. And we’re not done yet. We are always looking for new ways to improve what we do and how we do it. We are a work in progress, and we are determined to make as much progress as possible in the years to come.

Building the World’s Largest iPSC Repository: An Interview with CIRM’s Stephen Lin

This blog originally appeared on RegMedNet and was provided by Freya Leask, Editor & Community Manager of RegMedNet. In this interview, Stephen Lin, Senior Science Officer at the California Institute Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), discusses the scope, challenges and potential of CIRM’s iPSC Initiative. 

 

Stephen Lin

Stephen Lin received his PhD from Washington University (MO, USA) and completed his postdoctoral work at Harvard University (MA, USA). Lin is a senior science officer at CIRM which he joined in 2015 to oversee the development of a $32 million repository of iPSCs generated from up to 3000 healthy and diseased individuals and covering both complex and rare diseases. He also oversees a $40 million initiative to apply genomics and bioinformatics approaches to stem cell research and development of therapies. Lin is the program lead on the CIRM Translating Center which focuses on supporting the process development, safety/toxicity studies and manufacturing of stem cell therapy candidates to prepare them for clinical trials. He was previously a scientist at StemCells, Inc (CA, USA) and a staff scientist team lead at Thermo Fisher Scientific (MA, USA).

Q: Please introduce yourself and your institution.

I completed my PhD at Washington University in biochemistry, studying the mechanisms of aging, before doing my postdoc at Harvard, investigating programmed cell death. After that, I went into industry and have been working with stem cells ever since.

I was at the biotech company StemCells, Inc for 6 years where I worked on cell therapeutics. I then joined what was Life Technologies which is now Thermo Fisher Scientific.  I joined CIRM in 2015 as they were launching two new initiatives, the iPSC repository and the genomics initiative, which were a natural combination of my experience in both the stem cells industry and in genetic analysis.  I’ve been here for a year and a half, overseeing both initiatives as well as the CIRM Translating Center.

Q: What prompted the development of the iPSC repository?

Making iPSCs is challenging! It isn’t trivial for many research labs to produce these materials, especially for a wide variety of diseases; hence, the iPSC repository was set up in 2013. In its promotion of stem cells, CIRM had the financial resources to develop a bank for researchers and build up a critical mass of lines to save researchers the trouble of recruiting the patients, getting the consents, making and quality controlling the cells. CIRM wanted to cut that out and bring the resources straight to the research community.

Q: What are the challenges of storage so many iPSCs?

Many of the challenges of storing iPSCs and ensuring their quality are overcome with adequate quality controls at the production step. The main challenge is that we’re collecting samples from up to 3000 donors – the logistics of processing that many tissue samples from 11 funded and nonfunded collectors are difficult. The lines are being produced in the same uniform manner by one agency, Cellular Dynamics International (WI, USA), to ensure quality in terms of pluripotency, karyotyping and sterility testing.

Once the lines are made, they are stored at the Coriell Institute (NJ, USA). During storage, there is a challenge in simply keeping track of and distributing that many samples; we will have approximately 40 vials for each of the 3000 main lines. Both Cellular Dynamics and Coriell have sophisticated tracking systems and Coriell have set up a public catalog website where anyone can go to read about and order the lines. Most collections don’t have this functionality, as the IT infrastructure required for searching and displaying the lines along with clinical information, the ordering process, material transfer agreements and, for commercial uses, the licensing agreements was very complex.

Q: Can anyone use the repository?

Yes, they can! There is a fee to utilize the lines but we encourage researchers anywhere in the world to order them. The lines are mostly for research and academic purposes but the collection was built to be commercialized, all the way from collecting the samples. When the samples were collected, the patient consent included, among other things, banking, distribution, genetic characterization and commercialization.

The lines also have pre-negotiated licensing agreements with iPS Academia Japan (Kyoto, Japan) and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WI, USA). Commercial entities that want to use the cells for drug screening can obtain a license which allows them to use these lines for drug discovery and drug screening purposes without fear of back payment royalties down the road. People often forget during drug screening that the intellectual property to make the iPSCs is still under patent, so if you do discover a drug using iPSCs without taking care of these licensing agreements, your discovery could be liable to ownership by that original intellectual property holder.

Q: Will wider access to high quality iPSCs accelerate discovery?

That’s our hope. When people make iPSCs, the quality can be highly variable depending on the lab’s background and experience, which was another impetus to create the repository. Cellular Dynamics have set up a very robust system to create these lines in a rigorous quality control pipeline to guarantee that these lines are pluripotent and genetically stable.

Q: What diseases could these lines be used to study and treat?

We collected samples from patients with many different diseases – from neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, to eye disease and diabetes – as well as the corresponding controls. We also have lines from rare diseases, where the communities have no other tools to study them, for example, ADCY5 related dyskinesia. You can read our recent blogs about our efforts to generate new iPSC lines for ADCY5 and other rare diseases here and here.

Q: What are your plans for the iPSC initiative this year?

We’re currently the largest publicly available repository in the world and we aren’t complete yet. We have just under half of the lines in with the other half still being produced and quality controlled. Something else we want to do is add further information to make the lines more valuable and ensure the drug models are constantly improving. The reason people will want to use iPSCs for human disease modeling is whether they have valuable information associated with them.  For example, we are trying to add genetic and sequencing information to the catalog for lines that have it. This will also allow researchers to prescreen the lines they are interested in to match the diseases and drugs they are studying.

Q: Does the future for iPSCs lie in being utilized as tools to find therapeutics as opposed to therapeutics themselves?

I think the future is two pronged. There is certainly a future for disease modeling and drug screening. There is currently an initiative within the FDA, the CiPA initiative, is designed to replace current paradigms for drug safety testing with computational model and stem cell models. In particular, they hope to be able to screen drugs for cardiotoxicity in stem cells before they go to patients.  Mouse and rodent models have different receptors and ion channels so these cardiotoxic effects aren’t usually seen until clinical trials.

The other avenue is in therapeutics. However, this will come later in the game because the lines being used for research often can’t be used for therapeutics. Patient consent for therapeutic use has to be obtained at sample collection, the tissue should be handled in compliance with good lab practice and the lines must be produced following good manufacturing process (GMP) guidelines. They must then be characterized to ensure they have met all safety protocols for iPSC therapeutics.

There is already a second trial being initiated in Japan of an iPSC therapeutic to treat macular degeneration, utilizing allogenic lines that are human leukocyte antigen-compatible and extensively safety profiled. Companies such as Lonza (Basel, Switzerland) and Cellular Dynamics are starting to produce their own GMP lines, and CIRM is funding some translation programs where clinical grade iPSCs are being produced for therapeutics.


Further Reading