You can bank on CIRM

Way back in 2013, the CIRM Board invested $32 million in a project to create an iPSC Bank. The goal was simple;  to collect tissue samples from people who have different diseases, turn those samples into high quality stem cell lines – the kind known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) – and create a facility where those lines can be stored and distributed to researchers who need them.

Fast forward almost seven years and that idea has now become the largest public iPSC bank in the world. The story of how that happened is the subject of a great article (by CIRM’s Dr. Stephen Lin) in the journal Science Direct.

Dr. Stephen Lin

In 2013 there was a real need for the bank. Scientists around the world were doing important research but many were creating the cells they used for that research in different ways. That made it hard to compare one study to another and come up with any kind of consistent finding. The iPSC Bank was designed to change that by creating one source for high quality cells, collected, processed and stored under a single, consistent method.

Tissue samples – either blood or skin – were collected from thousands of individuals around California. Each donor underwent a thorough consent process – including being shown a detailed brochure – to explain what iPS cells are and how the research would be done.

The diseases to be studied through this bank include:

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Cardiomyopathies (heart conditions)
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Diabetic Retinopathy
  • Epilepsy
  • Fatty Liver diseases
  • Hepatitis C (HCV)
  • Intellectual Disabilities
  • Primary Open Angle Glaucoma
  • Pulmonary Fibrosis

The samples were screened to make sure they were safe – for example the blood was tested for HBV and HIV – and then underwent rigorous quality control testing to make sure they met the highest standards.

Once approved the samples were then turned into iPSCs at a special facility at the Buck Institute in Novato and those lines were then made available to researchers around the world, both for-profit and non-profit entities.

Scientists are now able to use these cells for a wide variety of uses including disease modeling, drug discovery, drug development, and transplant studies in animal research models. It gives them a greater ability to study how a disease develops and progresses and to help discover and test new drugs or other therapies

The Bank, which is now run by FUJIFILM Cellular Dynamics, has become a powerful resource for studying genetic variation between individuals, helping scientists understand how disease and treatment vary in a diverse population. Both CIRM and Fuji Film are committed to making even more improvements and additions to the collection in the future to ensure this is a vital resource for researchers for years to come.

Stem Cell Roundup: Rainbow Sherbet Fruit Fly Brains, a CRISPR/iPSC Mash-up and more

This week’s Round Up is all about the brain with some CRISPR and iPSCs sprinkled in:

Our Cool Stem Cell Image of the Week comes from Columbia University’s Zuckerman Institute:

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(Credit: Jon Enriquez/Mann Lab/Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute).

This rainbow sherbet-colored scientific art is a microscopy image of a fruit fly nervous system in which brain cells were randomly labeled with different colors. It was a figure in a Neuron study published this week showing how cells derived from the same stem cells can go down very different developmental paths but then later are “reunited” to carry out key functions, such as in this case, the nervous system control of leg movements.


A new therapeutic avenue for Parkinson’s diseaseBuck Institute

Many animal models of Parkinson’s disease are created by mutating specific genes to cause symptoms that mimic this incurable, neurodegenerative disorder. But, by far, most cases of Parkinson’s are idiopathic, a fancy term for spontaneous with no known genetic cause. So, researchers at the Buck Institute took another approach: they generated a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease using the pesticide, paraquat, exposure to which is known to increase the risk of the idiopathic form of Parkinson’s.

Their CIRM-funded study in Cell Reports showed that exposure to paraquat leads to cell senescence – in which cells shut down and stop dividing – particularly in astrocytes, brain cells that support the function of nerve cells. Ridding the mice of these astrocytes relieved some of the Parkinson’s like symptoms. What makes these results so intriguing is the team’s analysis of post-mortem brains from Parkinson’s patients also showed the hallmarks of increased senescence in astrocytes. Perhaps, therapeutic approaches that can remove senescent cells may yield novel Parkinson’s treatments.


Discovery may advance neural stem cell treatments for brain disordersSanford-Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (via Eureka Alert)

Another CIRM-funded study published this week in Nature Neuroscience may also help pave the way to new treatment strategies for neurologic disorders like Parkinson’s disease. A team at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) discovered a novel gene regulation system that brain stem cells use to maintain their ability to self-renew.

The study centers around messenger RNA, a molecular courier that transcribes a gene’s DNA code and carries it off to be translated into a protein. The team found that the removal of a chemical tag on mRNA inside mouse brain stem cells caused them to lose their stem cell properties. Instead, too many cells specialized into mature brain cells leading to abnormal brain development in animal studies. Team lead Jing Crystal Zhao, explained how this finding is important for future therapeutic development:

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Crystal Zhao

“As NSCs are increasingly explored as a cell replacement therapy for neurological disorders, understanding the basic biology of NSCs–including how they self-renew–is essential to harnessing control of their in vivo functions in the brain.”


Researchers Create First Stem Cells Using CRISPR Genome ActivationThe Gladstone Institutes

Our regular readers are most likely familiar with both CRISPR gene editing and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies. But, in case you missed it late last week, a Cell Stem Cell study out of Sheng Ding’s lab at the Gladstone Institutes, for the first time, combined the two by using CRISPR to make iPSCs. The study got a lot of attention including a review by Paul Knoepfler in his blog The Niche. Check it out for more details!

 

Eye on the prize: two stem cell studies restore vision in blind mice

For the 39 million people in the world who are blind, a vision-restoring therapy would be the ultimate prize. So far, this prize has remained out of reach, but two studies published this week have entered the ring as promising contenders in the fight against blindness.

In the red corner, we have a study published in Stem Cell Reports from the RIKEN Institute in Japan led by scientist Masayo Takahashi. Her team restored vision in blind mice with an advanced stage of retinal disease by transplanting sheets of light-sensing photoreceptor cells that were made from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

In the blue corner, we have a study published in Cell Stem Cell from the Buck Institute in California led by scientist Deepak Lamba. His team restored long-term vision in blind mice by transplanting embryonic stem cell-derived photoreceptor cells and preventing the immune system from rejecting the transplant.

Transplanting Retinal sheets

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Synaptic integration of graft retina into model mouse
Credit: RIKEN

Let’s first talk about the Riken study led by Masayo Takahashi. She is well known for her pioneering work on iPSC-derived treatments for macular degeneration – a disease that damages the retina and causes blindness.

In previous work, Takahashi and her team transplanted sheets of mouse stem cell-derived retinal progenitor cells, which mature into light-sensing cells called photoreceptors, into the eyes of mice. The cells within the sheet formed connections with the resident cells in the mouse eye, proving the feasibility of transplanting retinal sheets to restore vision.

In their current study, published in Stem Cell Reports, Takahashi’s team found that the retinal sheets could restore vision in mice that had a very severe form of retinal disease that left them unable to see light. After the mice received the retinal transplants, they responded to light, which they were unable to do previously. Like their other findings, they found that the cells in the transplant made connections with the host cells in the eye including nerve cells that send light-sensing signals to the brain.

First author on the study, Michiko Mandai explained the importance of their findings and their future plans in a news release,

“These results are a proof of concept for using iPSC-derived retinal tissue to treat retinal degeneration. We are planning to proceed to clinical trials in humans after a few more necessary studies using human iPSC-derived retinal tissue in animals. Clinical trials are the only way to determine how many new connections are needed for a person to be able to ‘see’ again.”

While excited by their results, Mandai and the rest of the RIKEN team aren’t claiming the prize for a successful treatment that will cure blindness in people just yet. Mandai commented,

“We cannot expect to restore practical vision at the moment. We will start from seeing a simple light, then possibly move on to larger figures in the next stage.”

Blocking the immune system

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Image showing transplanted GFP-expressing human stem cell derived photoreceptors (green) integrated in a host rodent retina stained for Otx2 (red).
Credit Jie Zhu, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

In the Buck Institute study, Lamba and his team took on the challenge of answering a controversial question about why retinal cell transplants typically don’t survive long-term in the eye. Some scientists think that the transplanted cells die off over time because they don’t integrate into the eye while others think that they are rejected and killed off by the immune system.

To answer this question, Lamba transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal cells into immunodeficient mice that lacked a protein receptor that’s vital for a functioning immune system. The retinal cells transplanted into immunodeficient mice survived much better than retinal cells transplanted into normal mice and developed into ten times as many photoreceptors that integrated themselves into the host eye.

Their next step was to transplant the retinal cells into mice that were blind and also lacked the same immune receptor as the other mice. After the transplant, the blind mice became responsive to light and showed brain activity associated with sensing light. Their newfound ability to see lasted for nine months to a year following the transplant.

Lamba believes that backing down the immune response is responsible for the long-term vision restoration in the blind mice. He explained the importance of their findings in a Buck Institute news release,

“That finding gives us a lot of hope for patients, that we can create some sort of advantage for these stem cell therapies so it won’t be just a transient response when these cells are put in, but a sustained vision for a long time. Even though the retina is often considered to be ‘immune privileged,’ we have found that we can’t ignore cell rejection when trying to transplant stem cells into the eye.”

In the future, Lamba will explore the potential for using drugs that target the specific protein receptor they blocked earlier to improve the outcome of embryonic stem cell-derived retinal transplants,

“We can also potentially identify other small molecules or recombinant proteins to reduce this interleukin 2 receptor gamma activity in the body – even eye-specific immune responses – that might reduce cell rejection. Of course it is not validated yet, but now that we have a target, that is the future of how we can apply this work to humans.”

Who will be the winner?

The Buck Institute study is interesting because it suggests that embryonic stem cell-based transplants combined with immunosuppression could be a promising strategy to improve vision in patients. But it also begs the question of whether the field should focus instead on iPSC-based therapies where a patient’s own stem cells are used to make the transplanted cells. This strategy would side step the immune response and prevent patients from a taking a lifetime of immunosuppressive drugs.

However, I’m not saying that RIKEN’s iPSC-based strategy is necessarily the way to go for treating blindness (at least not yet). It takes a lot of time and money to make iPSC lines and it’s not feasible given our current output to generate iPSC lines for every blind patient.

So, it sounds like a winner in this fight to cure blindness won’t be announced any time soon. In the meantime, both teams need to conduct further preclinical studies before they can move on to testing these treatments in human clinical trials.

Here at CIRM, we’re funding a promising Phase 1 clinical trial sponsored by jCyte for a form of blindness called Retinis Pigmentosa. Based on preliminary results with a small cohort of patient, the treatment seems safe and may even be showing hints of effectiveness in some patients.

Ultimately, more is better. As the number of stem cell clinical trials for blindness grows, the sooner we can find out which therapies work best for which patients.

Seeing is Believing: New Video on the Power of Stem Cells

skepticThe world is full of skeptics. Remember when you first heard about self-driving cars? I’m sure that information was met with comments like, “When pigs fly!” or “I’ll believe it when I see it!” Well, it turns out that the best way to get people to believe something is possible, is to show them.

And that’s our mission at CIRM. To show people that stem cell research is important and funding it is essential for the development of future therapies that can help patients with all sorts of diseases be they rare, acute, or chronic.

We’re doing this in multiple ways through our Stem Cellar blog and social media channels where we post about the latest advances in regenerative medicine research towards the clinic, through disease walks and support groups where we educate patients about stem cells, and through fun and engaging videos about the cutting-edge research that our agency is funding.

Last month, the world celebrated Stem Cell Awareness Day on October 12th. One of the ways we celebrated at CIRM was to give talks at local institutes about the power of stem cells for research and therapeutic development. One of these talks was at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato as part of their special public event on “Turning Promise of Regenerative Medicine into Reality” supported by the STEAM ENGINE, the teacher outreach program at the Buck Institute.

Kevin, CIRM’s communicators director, and I did a joint presentation on the different ways that scientists are using stem cells to model disease and to develop new treatments for patients. We also shared a few particularly exciting stories about new stem cell advancements that are being tested in clinical trials. One of them was a heartbreaking turned heartwarming story of Evangelina, a baby born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a disease that leaves children without a functioning immune system and often kills babies within a year of birth. Evangelina was part of a CIRM-funded clinical trial run by UC Los Angeles that transplanted the patient’s own genetically corrected blood stem cells. Evangelina is one of 30 children the UCLA team has cured and CIRM is now funding a Phase 2 clinical trial for this work.

Our talk was followed by exciting stories of stem cell research in the lab. Three talented postdoctoral fellows, who spoke about new developments in stem cell therapies for HIV, degenerative eye disease and neurodegenerative diseases. The talks were well received by the audience, who were actively speaking up to ask questions during the panel discussion with the speakers.

Panel on stem cells.

Stem cell panel: Kevin McCormack, Imilce Rodriguez-Fernandez, Joana Neves, Karen Ring.

It was a truly inspiring day full of learning and excitement about the future of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. But for the skeptics out there, don’t take my word for it, you can see for yourself by can watching the video recording here:


Related Links:

Meeting the scientists who are turning their daughter’s cells into a research tool – one that could change her life forever

There’s nothing like a face-to-face meeting to really get to know someone. And when the life of someone you love is in the hands of that person, then it’s a meeting that comes packed with emotion and importance.

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Lilly Grossman

Last week Gay and Steve Grossman got to meet the people who are working with their daughter Lilly’s stem cells. Lilly was born with a rare, debilitating condition called ADCY5-related dyskinesia. It’s an abnormal involuntary movement disorder caused by a genetic mutation that results in muscle weakness and severe pain. Because it is so rare, little research has been done on developing a deeper understanding of it, and even less on developing treatments.

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The Grossmans and Chris Waters meet the Buck team

 

That’s about to change. CIRM’s Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell  iPSC Bank – at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging – is now home to some of Lilly’s cells, and these are being turned into iPS cells for researchers to study the disease, and to hopefully develop and test new drugs or other therapies.

Gay said that meeting the people who are turning Lilly’s tissue sample into a research tool was wonderful:

“I think meeting the people who are doing the actual work at the lab is so imperative, and so important. I want them to see where their work is going and how they are not only affecting our lives and our daughter’s life but also the lives of the other kids who are affected by this rare disease and all rare diseases.”

Joining them for the trip to the Buck was Chris Waters, the driving force behind getting the Bank to accept new cell lines. Chris runs Rare Science a non-profit organization that focuses on children with rare diseases by partnering with patient family communities and foundations.

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Steve and Gay Grossman and Chris Waters

In a news release, Chris says there are currently 7,000 identified rare diseases and 50 percent of those affect children; tragically 30 percent of those children die before their 5th birthday:

“The biggest gap in drug development is that we are not addressing the specific needs of children, especially those with rare diseases.  We need to focus on kids. They are our future. If it takes 14 years and $2 billion to get FDA approval for a new drug, how is that going to address the urgent need for a solution for the millions of children across the world with a rare disease? That’s why we created Rare Science. How do we help kids right now, how do we help the families? How do we make change?”

Jonathan Thomas, the Chair of the CIRM Board, said one way to help these families and drive change is by adding samples of stem cells from rare diseases like ADCY5 to the iPSC Bank:

“Just knowing the gene that causes a particular problem is only the beginning. By having the iPSCs of individuals, we can start to investigate the diseases of these kids in the labs. Deciphering the biology of why there are similarities and dissimilarities between these children could the open the door for life changing therapies.”

When CIRM launched the iPSC Initiative – working with CDI, Coriell, the Buck Institute and researchers around California – the goal was to build the largest iPSC Bank in the world.  Adding new lines, such as the cells from people with ADCY5, means the collection will be even more diverse than originally planned.

Chris hopes this action will serve as a model for other rare diseases, creating stem cell lines from them to help close the gap between discovery research and clinical impact. And she says seeing the people who are turning her idea into reality is just amazing:

“Oh my gosh. It’s just great to be here, to see all these people who are making this happen, they’re great. And I think they benefit too, by being able to put a human face on the diseases they are working on. I think you learn so much by meeting the patients and their families because they are the ones who are living with this every day. And by understanding it through their eyes, you can improve your research exponentially. It just makes so much more sense.”

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RARE Bears for RARE Science

To help raise funds for this work Rare Science is holding a special auction, starting tomorrow, of RARE Bears. These are bears that have been hand made by, and this is a real thing, “celebrity quilters”, so you know the quality is going to be amazing. All proceeds from the auction go to help RARE Science accelerate the search for treatments for the 200 million kids around the world who are undiagnosed or who have a rare disease.

 

Trash talking and creating a stem cell community

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Imilce Rodriguez-Fernandez likes to talk trash. No, really, she does. In her case it’s cellular trash, the kind that builds up in our cells and has to be removed to ensure the cells don’t become sick.

Imilce was one of several stem cell researchers who took part in a couple of public events over the weekend, on either side of San Francisco Bay, that served to span both a geographical and generational divide and create a common sense of community.

The first event was at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Marin County, near San Francisco. It was titled “Stem Cell Celebration” and that’s pretty much what it was. It featured some extraordinary young scientists from the Buck talking about the work they are doing in uncovering some of the connections between aging and chronic diseases, and coming up with solutions to stop or even reverse some of those changes.

One of those scientists was Imilce. She explained that just as it is important for people to get rid of their trash so they can have a clean, healthy home, so it is important for our cells to do the same. Cells that fail to get rid of their protein trash become sick, unhealthy and ultimately stop working.

Imilce is exploring the cellular janitorial services our bodies have developed to deal with trash, and trying to find ways to enhance them so they are more effective, particularly as we age and those janitorial services aren’t as efficient as they were in our youth.

Unlocking the secrets of premature aging

Chris Wiley, another postdoctoral researcher at the Buck, showed that some medications that are used to treat HIV may be life-saving on one level, preventing the onset of full-blown AIDS, but that those benefits come with a cost, namely premature aging. Chris said the impact of aging doesn’t just affect one cell or one part of the body, but ripples out affecting other cells and other parts of the body. By studying the impact those medications have on our bodies he’s hoping to find ways to maintain the benefits of those drugs, but get rid of the downside.

Creating a Community

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Across the Bay, the U.C. Berkeley Student Society for Stem Cell Research held it’s 4th annual conference and the theme was “Culturing a Stem Cell Community.”

The list of speakers was a Who’s Who of CIRM-funded scientists from U.C. Davis’ Jan Nolta and Paul Knoepfler, to U.C. Irvine’s Henry Klassen and U.C. Berkeley’s David Schaffer. The talks ranged from progress in fighting blindness, to how advances in stem cell gene editing are cause for celebration, and concern.

What struck me most about both meetings was the age divide. At the Buck those presenting were young scientists, millennials; the audience was considerably older, baby boomers. At UC Berkeley it was the reverse; the presenters were experienced scientists of the baby boom generation, and the audience were keen young students representing the next generation of scientists.

Bridging the divide

But regardless of the age differences there was a shared sense of involvement, a feeling that regardless of which side of the audience we are on we all have something in common, we are all part of the stem cell community.

All communities have a story, something that helps bind them together and gives them a sense of common purpose. For the stem cell community there is not one single story, there are many. But while those stories all start from a different place, they end up with a common theme; inspiration, determination and hope.

 

Celebrating Stem Cell Awareness Day with SUPER CELLS!

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To all you stem cell lovers out there, today is your day! The second Wednesday of October is Stem Cell Awareness Day (SCAD), which brings together organizations and individuals that are working to ensure the general public realizes the benefits of stem cell research.

For patients in desperate need of treatments for diseases without cures, this is also a day to recognize their struggles and the scientific advances in the stem cell field that are bringing us closer to helping these patients.

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Induced pluripotent stem cells.

How are people celebrating SCAD?

This year, a number of institutes in California are hosting events in honor of Stem Cell Awareness Day. Members of the CIRM team will be speaking on Saturday about “The Power of Stem Cells” at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato (RSVP on Facebook) and at the Berkeley Student Society for Stem Cell Research Conference in Berkeley (RSVP on Eventbrite). There are also a few SCAD events going on this week in Southern California. You can learn more about these all events on our website.

You can also find out about other SCAD celebrations and events on social media by following the hashtag #StemCellAwarenessDay and #StemCellDay on Twitter.

Super Cells: The Power of Stem Cells

Super Cells exhibit at the Lawrence Hall of Science

Super Cells exhibit at the Lawrence Hall of Science

Today, the CIRM Stem Cellar is celebrating SCAD by sharing our recent visit to the Lawrence Hall of Science, which is currently hosting an exhibit called “Super Cells: The Power of Stem Cells”.

This is a REALLY COOL interactive exhibit that explains what stem cells are, what they do, and how we can harness their power to treat disease and injury. CIRM was one of the partners that helped create this exhibit, so we were especially excited to see it in person.

Super Cells has four “high-tech interactive zones and a comprehensive educational guide for school children ages 6-14”. You can read more details about the exhibit in this promotional handout. Based on my visit to the exhibit, I can easily say­­ that Super Cells will be interesting and informative to any age group.

The exhibit was unveiled on September 28th, and the Hall told us that they have already heard positive reviews from their visitors. We had the opportunity to talk further with Susan Gregory, the Deputy Director of the Hall, and Adam Frost, a marketing specialist, about the Super Cells exhibit. We asked them a few questions and will share their interview below followed by a few fun pictures we took of the exhibit.


Q: Why did the Lawrence Hall of Science decide to host the Super Cells exhibit?

The Lawrence Hall of Science has a history of bringing in exciting and engaging traveling exhibitions, and we were looking for something new to excite our visitors in the Fall season. When the opportunity presented itself to host Super Cells, we thought it would be a good fit for our audience. Additionally, the Hall is increasing its programming and exhibits in the fields of biology, chemistry and bioengineering.

Q: What aspects of the Super Cells exhibit do you think are valuable to younger kids?

We strive to make our exhibit experiences hands-on and interactive. The Hall believes that the best way for kids to learn science is for them to be active in their learning. Super Cells offers a variety of elements that speak to our philosophy of learning and make learning science more fun.

Q: How is exhibit similar or unique to other exhibits you’ve hosted previously?

 The Hall hosts and develops exhibits across a broad range of scientific, engineering, technology and mathematical topics. We are always looking for exhibits that address recent scientific advances, and also try to showcase cutting edge research.

Super Cells presents both basic cell biology and information about recent medical and scientific advances, so it fits. Also, as mentioned in our behind the scenes story about the exhibit install, in the past many of our traveling exhibits were very large experiences that tended to take up a lot of space on the museum floor. One thing that is great about Super Cells is that it packs a lot of information into a relatively small space, allowing us to keep a number of experiences and activities that our audience has come to love on the floor, instead of removing them to make room.

Q: Will there be any special events at the Hall featuring this exhibit?

On November 11, the Hall will host a fun day of activities centered around DNA and the exhibit. Younger visitors will make DNA bracelets based on the unique traits in their genome, while older kids will isolate their own DNA using a swab from inside their cheek. We are still finalizing the details of this event, but it will definitely happen.

Q:  Why do you think it’s important for younger students and the general public to learn about stem cells and stem cell research?

As UC Berkeley’s public science center, the Hall is committed to providing a window into cutting edge research and the latest scientific information. We think it’s really important for people and kids to learn about the skills and science behind current research so they can be prepared for a future of incredible scientific challenges and opportunities that we can’t foresee.


Super Cells will be open at the Lawrence Hall of Science until November 27th, so be sure to check it out before then. If you don’t live in California, don’t worry, Super Cells will be traveling around the U.S., Europe and Canada. You can find out where Super Cells is touring next on their website.

We hope you enjoy our photos of the Super Cells exhibit!

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From flies to mice: Improving stem cell therapy for degenerative eye diseases

Stem cell therapies for degenerative eye diseases sound promising – inject retinal progenitor cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells into the eye where they will integrate and replace damaged retinal tissue to hopefully restore sight. However, a significant road block is preventing these stem cell transplants from doing their job: the transplanted cells are unable to survive and generate healthy retinal tissue due to the unhealthy, degenerative environment they find themselves in.

A retina of a patient with macular degeneration. (Photo credit: Paul Parker/SPL)

A retina of a patient with macular degeneration. (Photo credit: Paul Parker/SPL)

In patients with age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa, retinal tissue in the eye is in a state of inflammation initiated by innate immune cells such as macrophage-derived microglia. When activated, microglia can either promote an inflammatory response or resolve inflammation and promote tissue repair and regeneration.

This balance between a pro-inflammation and tissue regeneration is something that scientists are looking to manipulate in order to develop new potential therapeutic strategies for degenerative eye diseases.

Chapter 1: Identifying MANF in flies

In a paper published today in the journal Science, Buck researchers report that they have identified a natural immune system modulator called MANF that improved the success of retinal repair in both fly and mouse models of eye diseases, and enhanced retinal cell transplantation in mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration.

The story of MANF starts with Drosophila fruit flies grown in the lab of Buck Professor Dr. Heinrich Jasper. His lab studies hemocytes, the fly equivalent of blood cells, and the repair factors that they secrete in response to injury. To model retinal damage, Jasper and his lab exposed photoreceptors in the retina of flies to UV light and then screened for secreted proteins that were released by hemocytes in response to UV damage.

They identified a protein called a secreted protein called MANF and hypothesized that this factor could promote tissue regeneration and act as a neuroprotective, “retinal repair factor”.

In a Buck Institute news release, Jasper explained how further experiments showed that MANF was secreted by hemocytes in response to UV induced damage in the retina, and that it shifted these immune cells from promoting inflammation to reducing inflammation and promoting retinal regeneration.

Chapter 2: MANF is neuroprotective in mice

Deepak Lamba and his lab

Deepak Lamba and his lab

Part two of the story involved determining whether MANF had similar neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties in mammalian models. Dr. Deepak Lamba, Buck Professor and co-senior author on the study, took the lead and first tested whether MANF could reduce light-induced damage of photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration.

Injecting MANF protein into the eyes of these mice significantly reduced cell death caused by light exposure. Similarly, injection of fibroblast cells that secreted MANF also had a neuroprotective effect in the damaged retina by recruiting innate immune cells to promote the body’s natural repair mechanisms.

Chapter 3: MANF improves cell transplantation in mice

The final chapter involved testing whether MANF could improve the outcome of transplanted photoreceptor cells in blind mice genetically engineered to have retinal damage. The addition of MANF improved the survival and integration of the transplanted cells in the retinas of the mice and also improved the animals’ visual function.

Lamba concluded in a Buck news release that, “MANF promotes healing and helps create a microenvironment conducive to successful transplantation.”

These preliminary results in flies and mice are encouraging and Jasper believes that the neuroprotective effects of MANF could potentially be applied to other diseases of aging at an early stage that could prevent disease progression.

Heinrich Jasper

Heinrich Jasper

“Our hope is that MANF will be useful for treatment of inflammatory conditions in many disease contexts,” Jasper explained. “Focusing on immune modulation to promote a healthy repair response to tissue damage rather than a deleterious inflammatory response is a new frontier in aging research.”