Stem cells stories that caught our eye: switching cell ID to treat diabetes, AI predicts cell fate, stem cell ALS therapy for Canada

Treating diabetes by changing a cell’s identity. Stem cells are an ideal therapy strategy for treating type 1 diabetes. That’s because the disease is caused by the loss of a very specific cell type: the insulin-producing beta cell in the pancreas. So, several groups are developing treatments that aim to replace the lost cells by transplanting stem cell-derived beta cells grown in the lab. In fact, Viacyte is applying this approach in an ongoing CIRM-funded clinical trial.

In preliminary animal studies published late last week, a Stanford research team has shown another approach may be possible which generates beta cells inside the body instead of relying on cells grown in a petri dish. The CIRM-funded Cell Metabolism report focused on alpha cells, another cell type in pancreas which produces the hormone glucagon.

glucagon

Microscopy of islet cells, round clusters of cells found in the pancreas. The brown stained cells are glucagon-producing alpha cells. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

After eating a meal, insulin is critical for getting blood sugar into your cells for their energy needs. But glucagon is needed to release stored up sugar, or glucose, into your blood when you haven’t eaten for a while. The research team, blocked two genes in mice that are critical for maintaining an alpha cell state. Seven weeks after inhibiting the activity of these genes, the researchers saw that many alpha cells had converted to beta cells, a process called direct reprogramming.

Does the same thing happen in humans? A study of cadaver donors who had been recently diagnosed with diabetes before their death suggests the answer is yes. An analysis of pancreatic tissue samples showed cells that produced both insulin and glucagon, and appeared to be in the process of converting from beta to alpha cells. Further genetic tests showed that diabetes donor cells had lost activity in the two genes that were blocked in the mouse studies.

It turns out that there’s naturally an excess of alpha cells so, as team lead Seung Kim mentioned in a press release, this strategy could pan out:

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Seung Kim. Credit: Steve Fisch, Stanford University

“This indicates that it might be possible to use targeted methods to block these genes or the signals controlling them in the pancreatic islets of people with diabetes to enhance the proportion of alpha cells that convert into beta cells.”

Using computers to predict cell fate. Deep learning is a cutting-edge area of computer science that uses computer algorithms to perform tasks that border on artificial intelligence. From beating humans in a game of Go to self-driving car technology, deep learning has an exciting range of applications. Now, scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München in Germany have used deep learning to predict the fate of cells.

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Using deep learning, computers can predict the fate of these blood stem cells.
Credit: Helmholtz Zentrum München.

The study, published this week in Nature Methods, focused on blood stem cells also called hematopoietic stem cells. These cells live in the bone marrow and give rise to all the different types of blood cells. This process can go awry and lead to deadly disorders like leukemia, so scientists are very interested in exquisitely understanding each step that a blood stem cell takes as it specializes into different cell types.

Researchers can figure out the fate of a blood stem cells by adding tags, which glow with various color, to the cell surface . Under a microscope these colors reveal the cells identity. But this method is always after the fact. There no way to look at a cell and predict what type of cell it is turning into. In this study, the team filmed the cells under a microscope as they transformed into different cell types. The deep learning algorithm processed the patterns in the cells and developed cell fate predictions. Now, compared to the typical method using the glowing tags, the researchers knew the eventual cell fates much sooner. The team lead, Carsten Marr, explained how this new technology could help their research:

“Since we now know which cells will develop in which way, we can isolate them earlier than before and examine how they differ at a molecular level. We want to use this information to understand how the choices are made for particular developmental traits.”

Stem cell therapy for ALS seeking approval in Canada. (Karen Ring) Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neuromuscular disease that kills off the nerve cells responsible for controlling muscle movement. Patients with ALS suffer from muscle weakness, difficulty in speaking, and eventually breathing. There is no cure for ALS and the average life expectancy after diagnosis is just 2 – 5 years. But companies are pursuing stem cell-based therapies in clinical trials as promising treatment options.

One company in particular, BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics based in the US and Israel, is testing a mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy called NurOwn in ALS patients in clinical trials. In their Phase 2 trials, they observed clinical improvements in slowing down the rate of disease progression following the stem cell treatment.

In a recent update from our friends at the Signals Blog, BrainStorm has announced that it is seeking regulatory approval of its NurOwn treatment for ALS patients in Canada. They will be working with the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine (CCRM) to apply for a special regulatory approval pathway with Health Canada, the Canadian government department responsible for national public health.

In a press release, BrainStorm CEO Chaim Lebovits, highlighted this new partnership and his company’s mission to gain regulatory approval for their ALS treatment:

“We are pleased to partner with CCRM as we continue our efforts to develop and make NurOwn available commercially to patients with ALS as quickly as possible. We look forward to discussing with Health Canada staff the results of our ALS clinical program to date, which we believe shows compelling evidence of safety and efficacy and may qualify for rapid review under Canada’s regulatory guidelines for drugs to treat serious or life-threatening conditions.”

Stacey Johnson who wrote the Signals Blog piece on this story explained that while BrainStorm is not starting a clinical trial for ALS in Canada, there will be significant benefits if its treatment is approved.

“If BrainStorm qualifies for this pathway and its market authorization request is successful, it is possible that NurOwn could be available for patients in Canada by early 2018.  True access to improved treatments for Canadian ALS patients would be a great outcome and something we are all hoping for.”

CIRM is also funding stem cell-based therapies in clinical trials for ALS. Just yesterday our Board awarded Cedars-Sinai $6.15 million dollars to conduct a Phase 1 trial for ALS patients that will use “cells called astrocytes that have been specially re-engineered to secrete proteins that can help repair and replace the cells damaged by the disease.” You can read more about this new trial in our latest news release.

Partnering with the best to help find cures for rare diseases

As a state agency we focus most of our efforts and nearly all our money on California. That’s what we were set up to do. But that doesn’t mean we don’t also look outside the borders of California to try and find the best research, and the most promising therapies, to help people in need.

Today’s meeting of the CIRM Board was the first time we have had a chance to partner with one of the leading research facilities in the country focusing on children and rare diseases; St. Jude Children’s Researech Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

a4da990e3de7a2112ee875fc784deeafSt. Jude is getting $11.9 million to run a Phase I/II clinical trial for x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disorder (SCID), a catastrophic condition where children are born without a functioning immune system. Because they are unable to fight off infections, many children born with SCID die in the first few years of life.

St. Jude is teaming up with researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) to genetically modify the patient’s own blood stem cells, hopefully creating a new blood system and repairing the damaged immune system. St. Jude came up with the method of doing this, UCSF will treat the patients. Having that California component to the clinical trial is what makes it possible for us to fund this work.

This is the first time CIRM has funded work with St. Jude and reflects our commitment to moving the most promising research into clinical trials in people, regardless of whether that work originates inside or outside California.

The Board also voted to fund researchers at Cedars-Sinai to run a clinical trial on ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Like SCID, ALS is a rare disease. As Randy Mills, our President and CEO, said in a news release:

CIRM CEO and President, Randy Mills.

CIRM CEO and President, Randy Mills.

“While making a funding decision at CIRM we don’t just look at how many people are affected by a disease, we also look at the severity of the disease on the individual and the potential for impacting other diseases. While the number of patients afflicted by these two diseases may be small, their need is great. Additionally, the potential to use these approaches in treating other disease is very real. The underlying technology used in treating SCID, for example, has potential application in other areas such as sickle cell disease and HIV/AIDS.”

We have written several blogs about the research that cured children with SCID.

The Board also approved funding for a clinical trial to develop a treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). This is an autoimmune disease that affects around 1.25 million Americans, and millions more around the globe.

T1D is where the body’s own immune system attacks the cells that produce insulin, which is needed to control blood sugar levels. If left untreated it can result in serious, even life-threatening, complications such as vision loss, kidney damage and heart attacks.

Researchers at Caladrius Biosciences will take cells, called regulatory T cells (Tregs), from the patient’s own immune system, expand the number of those cells in the lab and enhance them to make them more effective at preventing the autoimmune attack on the insulin-producing cells.

The focus is on newly-diagnosed adolescents because studies show that at the time of diagnosis T1D patients usually have around 20 percent of their insulin-producing cells still intact. It’s hoped by intervening early the therapy can protect those cells and reduce the need for patients to rely on insulin injections.

David J. Mazzo, Ph.D., CEO of Caladrius Biosciences, says this is hopeful news for people with type 1 diabetes:

David Mazzo

David Mazzo

“We firmly believe that this therapy has the potential to improve the lives of people with T1D and this grant helps us advance our Phase 2 clinical study with the goal of determining the potential for CLBS03 to be an effective therapy in this important indication.”

 


Related Links:

Wishing You and Your Stem Cells a Happy Valentine’s Day!

cirm-valentines-day

Roses are Red, 

Violets are Blue,

 Let’s thank pluripotent stem cells,

For making humans like me and you

Happy Valentine’s Day from me and everyone at CIRM! Today, we are celebrating this day of love by sending our warmest wishes to you our readers. We’re grateful for your interest in learning more about stem cells and your steadfast support for the advancement of stem cell research.

We also want to wish a Happy Valentine’s Day to your stem cells, yes that’s right the stem cells you have in your body. Without pluripotent stem cells, which are embryonic cells that generate all the cells in your body, humans wouldn’t exist. And without adult stem cells, which live in your tissues and organs, we wouldn’t have healthy, functioning bodies.

So, as you’re wishing your loved ones, friends, and colleagues a Happy Valentine’s Day, take a moment to thank your body and the stem cells living in it for keeping you alive.

I’ll leave you with a few Valentine’s Day themed stem cell blogs for you to enjoy. Have a wonderful day!


Valentine’s Day Themed Blogs:

1) Toronto Scientists Have an Affair with the Heart by OIRMexpression

Ventricular heart muscle cells. Image courtesy of Dr. Michael Laflamme

Ventricular heart muscle cells. Image courtesy of Dr. Michael Laflamme

2) A Cardiac Love Triangle: How Transcription Factors Interact to Make a Heart by the Stem Cellar

© Gladstone Institutes photo credit: Kim Cordes / Gladstone Institute Lay Description: In this image, human embryonic stem cells have been differentiated into cardiomyocytes, or heart muscle cells, and stained to show the expression of cardiac Troponin T (red), a protein that helps cardiomyocytes to contract, and cell nuclei (blue). Scientific Description: Cultured human iPSCs reprogrammed into CMs. Stain for cTnT (red), and DAPI (blue). Original caption: cardiomyocytes.tif

Heart cells made from human induced pluripotent stem cells. © Gladstone Institutes
photo credit: Kim Cordes / Gladstone Institute

3) Stem Cells on Valentine’s Day: Update on Cardiac Regenerative Medicine by Paul Knoepfler on the Niche Blog

4) Hope For Broken Hearts this Valentine’s Day – a Clinical Trial to Repair the Damage by the Stem Cellar


Special thanks to Samantha Yammine for letting us her her “Icy Astrocytes” photo in our Valentine’s Day graphic.

The power of the patient’s voice: how advocates shape clinical trials and give hope to those battling deadly diseases

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The Stack family: L to R Alex, Natalie, Nancy & Jeff

Tennis great Martina Navratilova was once being interviewed about what made her such a great competitor and she said it was all down to commitment. When pressed she said “the difference between involvement and commitment is like ham and eggs; the chicken is involved but the pig is committed.”

That’s how I feel about the important role that patients and patient advocates play in the work that we do at CIRM. Those of us who work here are involved. The patients and patient advocates are committed. This isn’t just their life’s work;  it’s their life.

I was reminded of that last week when I had the privilege of talking with Nancy Stack, the Patient Representative on a Clinical Advisory Panel (CAP) we have created for a program to treat cystinosis. She has an amazing story to tell. But before we get to that I have to do a little explaining.

Cystinosis is a rare disease, affecting maybe only 2,000 people worldwide, that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. Current treatments are limited, which is why the average life expectancy for someone with this is only around 27 years.

When we fund a project that is already in, or hoping to be in, a clinical trial we create a CAP to help assist the team behind the research. The CAP consists of a CIRM Science Officer, an independent scientific expert in this case for cystinosis, and a Patient Representative.

The patient’s voice

The Patient Representative’s role is vital because they can help the researchers understand the needs of the patient and take those needs into account when designing the trial. In the past, many researchers had little contact with patients and so designed the trial around their own needs. The patients had to fit into that model. We think it should be the other way around; that the model should fit the patients. The Patient Representatives help us make that happen.

Nancy Stack did just that. At the first meeting of the CAP she showed up with a list of 38 questions that she and other families with cystinosis had come up with for the researchers. They went from the blunt – “Will I die from the treatment” – to the practical –  “How will children/teens keep up with school during the process?” – and included a series of questions from a 12-year old girl with the disease – “Will I lose my hair because I’ve been growing it out for a long time? Will I feel sick? Will it hurt?”

Nancy says the questions are not meant to challenge the researcher, in this case U.C. San Diego’s Stephanie Cherqui, but to ensure that if the trial is given the go-ahead by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that every patient who signs up for it knows exactly what they are getting into. That’s particularly important because many of those could be children or teenagers.

Fully informed

“As parents we know the science is great and is advancing, but we have real people who are going to go through this treatment so we have a responsibility to know what will it mean to them. Patients know they could die of the disease and so this research has real world implications for them.”

“I think without this, without allowing the patients voice to be heard, you would have a hard time recruiting patients for this kind of clinical trial.”

Nancy says not only was Dr. Cherqui not surprised by the questions, she welcomed them. Dr. Cherqui has been supported and funded by the Cystinosis Research Foundation for years and Nancy says she regards the patients and patient advocates as partners in this journey:

“She knows we are not challenging her, we’re supporting her and helping her cover every aspect of the research to help make it work.”

Nancy became committed to finding a cure for cystinosis when her daughter, Natalie, was diagnosed with the condition when she was just 7 months old. The family were handed a pamphlet titled “What to do when your child has a terminal disease” and told there was no cure.

Birthday wish

In 2003, on the eve of her 12th birthday, Nancy asked Natalie what her wish was for her birthday. She wrote on a napkin “to have my disease go away forever.” The average life expectancy for people with cystinosis at that point was 18. Nancy told her husband “We have to do something.”

They launched the Cystinosis Research Foundation and a few weeks later they held their first fundraiser. That first year they raised $427,000, an impressive amount for such a rare disease. Last year they raised $4.94 million. Every penny of that $4.94 million goes towards research, making them the largest funders of cystinosis research in the world.

“We learned that for there to be hope there has to be research, and to do research we needed to raise funds. Without that we knew our children would not survive this disease.”

Natalie is now 26, a graduate of Georgetown and USC, and about to embark on a career in social work. Nancy knows many others are not so fortunate:

“Every year we lose some of our adults, even some of our teens, and that is unbelievably hard. Those other children, wherever they may live, they are my children too. We are all connected to each other and that’s what motivates me every day. Having a child with this disease means that time is running out and there must be a commitment to work hard every day to find a cure, and never giving up until you do.”

That passion for the cause, that compassion for others and determination to help others makes the Patient Representative on the CAP so important. They are a reminder that we all need to work as hard as we can, as fast as we can, and do everything we can to help these trials succeed.

And we are committed to doing that.


Related Links:

How a Soviet space craft proved an inspiration for CIRM’s latest Board member

blumenthal

George Blumenthal’s life changed on October 4, 1957. That’s the day the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the world’s first artificial earth satellite. The beach ball-sized satellite marked the start of the space race between the US and the USSR. It also marked the start of Blumenthal’s fascination with science and space.

Fast forward almost 60 years and Dr. Blumenthal, now a world-renowned professor of astronomy and astrophysics and the Chancellor of U.C. Santa Cruz, has been named as the newest member of the CIRM governing Board.

California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom made the appointment calling Dr. Blumenthal a world-class scientist and forward-looking administrator:

“As a Regent of the University of California, I have been impressed by his deep commitment to expanding educational opportunity for all California students and enhancing research opportunities. I am confident the Chancellor’s vision and leadership will be of immense benefit to the CIRM Board.”

In a news release Dr. Blumenthal said he is looking forward to being part of CIRM:

“The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine is doing outstanding work, and I am delighted to join the Board. CIRM support has advanced stem cell research at UC Santa Cruz and across the state. Public support for this work remains strong, and I look forward to playing a role in securing the future of the institute.”

sputnik

Sputnik

But getting back to Sputnik for a moment. In an article in Valley Vision, the newsletter for Joint Venture Silicon Valley, Dr. Blumenthal said the launch of Sputnik helped fuel his interest in science in general and space in particular.

“Sputnik had a profound effect on American science and it certainly played a part in my interest in space and physics all through high school, college and graduate school,” says Blumenthal. “I intended to become a particle physicist, but after a year in grad school I became more interested in space and astronomy, so I changed from studying the smallest things in the universe to the biggest, like galaxies.”

Dr. Blumenthal became the first in his family to graduate from college. He then went on to enjoy a successful career as a professor of astronomy and astrophysics. His research helped deepen our understanding of galaxies and the cosmos, including the role that dark matter plays in the formation of the structure of the universe. He became the chair of the California Association for Research in Astronomy (CARA), which manages the W. M. Keck Observatory near the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. He also co-authored two of the leading astronomy textbooks, 21st Century Astronomy and Understanding our Universe.

Blumenthal joined the faculty of UC Santa Cruz in 1972 and was named chancellor in 2007. Throughout his career he has been a champion of diversity both at UCSC, where he created the Chancellor’s Advisory Council on Diversity, and throughout the U.C. system, where he served as a member of the Regents’ Study Group on Diversity.

Jonathan Thomas, Chair of the CIRM Board, welcomed Dr. Blumenthal, saying:

“We are honored to have someone with Dr. Blumenthal’s experience and expertise join the Board. As Chancellor at UCSC he has demonstrated a clear commitment to advancing world-class research and earned a reputation as a bold and visionary leader. We look forward to seeing those qualities in action to help advance CIRM’s mission.”

At CIRM we are shooting for the stars, aiming as high as we can to help accelerate stem cell treatements to patients with unmet medical needs. It will be nice having Dr. Blumenthal on Board to help guide us.

Results are in: The Winners of our 2017 #StemCellResolution Campaign

We asked and you answered! In January, we launched our first Stem Cell Resolution campaign to raise awareness about the importance of stem cell research. We challenged scientists, students, institutes and the public to make a #StemCellResolution and share it on social media.

The goal of our campaign was to start a larger conversation about why stem cell research is important not just to advance science but to develop cures for diseases that currently have none.

Our campaign ran for the month of January, and we had global participation on multiple social media platforms including Twitter, Instagram, videos and blogs. Some resolutions involved answering important research questions while others involved empowering the public to pursue and understand scientific evidence to make their own informed decisions about the benefits of stem cell treatments for treating disease.

I was thoroughly impressed with everyone’s enthusiasm towards supporting and sharing this campaign that I plan to hold it again next year. But for now, I’ll announce the winners of our 2017 #StemCellResolution campaign. We picked the most inspiring resolution for each social media category and a few honorable mentions. The winner of each category will receive CIRM Stem Cell Champions t-shirts.

You can view the full list of this year’s stem cell resolutions on our Storify.


Twitter

Winner: Hamideh Emrani (@HamidehEmrani)

Hamideh is a science and technology communicator and the founder of Emrani Communications. 

Honorable Mention: Christine Liu (@Christineliuart)

Christine is a neuroscience phd student at UC Berkeley and a science communicator and artist.

Instagram

Winner: Pedro Soria Jr. (@shadowtype)

Pedro is a former CIRM Bridges student who is conducting stem cell research in neural regeneration at Western University in Southern California.

My Stem Cell Resolution for 2017 is to create a social media page dedicated to educating, enlightening and disseminating information about past, current, and future stem cell related studies to the general public, as well as those in science, in order to bring to light the importance of stem cell research. My objective is to bring people together regardless of whether or not they Originate from the natural sciences and spark an interest in this emerging field. Coming from a family where I'm first generation Mexican American and the only scientist has shown me the importance of communication amongst those that have little knowledge of the natural world especially people that come from countries that aren't scientifically advanced. Both my parents are born and raised in Michoacan, Mexico, in a small mountain town called Ario de Rosales. Back in my parents day, most people were farmers that worked from sun rise to sunset in order to feed and provide for their families. Naturally, they had little time for education because of the need to survive but had a positive work ethic, which I was lucky to inherit. My parents came to America for an opportunity to improve their situations and provide for themselves and families back home. They worked so hard to obtain what they have and to give me the chance they never had, which I'm so deeply grateful for each and every day of my life!! I had always felt destined for more than mediocre and enjoy taking on challenges to improve myself mentally, physically and spiritually. As a stem cell scientist, it is my responsibility to share my knowledge with everyone I encounter in order to bring change to this world. I wouldn't be where I am if it weren't for the support of my family, friends, professors, colleagues and of course #CIRM . Please join me on this journey and spread the word to anyone that will listen because we're all on this ride together in one way or another. That is my #stemcellresolution #soriaclan #bringingchange #cellculture Look out for my social media page #cellculture for all your stem cell info and check out the @cirm_stemcells to see what this beautiful institute is doing this year!!! #StemCellResolution

A post shared by Pedro Soria Jr. (@shadowtype) on

Video

Winner: Samantha Yammine (@SamanthaZY)

Samantha Yammine is a science communicator and a PhD candidate in Dr. Derek van der Kooy’s lab at the University of Toronto. You can learn more about Sam and her research on her website. She also recently wrote a guest blog for CIRM about a Keystone stem cell conference that you can find here.

Honorable Mentions: Paul Knoepfler (@pknoepfler)

Paul is a biomedical scientist at UC Davis, a science writer, advocate, and cancer survivor. He writes a popular stem cell blog called the Niche.

Honorable Mention: Catia B (@apulgarita)

Catia is a PhD student at MIT and is conducting research on programming & stem cells. She is originally from Portugal and has a personal blog about traveling and the PhD lifestyle.

Honorable Mention: Gladstone trainees (@Gladstone_GO)

Gladstone students and postdocs stepped up to the challenge and filmed stem cell resolutions about their research.

Blog

Winner: Sophie Arthur (@SophArthur)

Soph is a PhD student in Southampton, K studying embryonic stem cell metabolism. Her goal is to find ways to maintain the pluripotent quality of stem cells. She has a personal science communications blog called Soph Talks Science.

 An excerpt from Soph’s blog is below. I highly recommend reading the entire piece as it is very engaging and inspiring!

“For my Stem Cell Resolution – I couldn’t decide on one, so instead, I’ve made 4! Oops!

First, I want to raise awareness that stem cell biology is as important as stem cell treatments! There is lots of hype over stem cell treatments across the globe, but I want to stress that there are only a handful that have actually been approved! I could very well be biased as I’m studying stem cells and their biological mechanisms that exist normally in our bodies – but I want to stress the importance of this work. Simple biology – as I think it will hold the key to all the future stem cell medicine! Once we know how stem cells work in our bodies we can exploit that to make the treatments, or even learn more about our normal development!

 Honorable Mention: Stacey Johnson (@msstaceyerin)

Stacey is the Director of Communications and Marketing for CCRM, the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine in Canada. She also is a regular contributor to CCRM’s Signals Blog.

“Since I’m not a scientist, a student or a patient, but I regularly communicate about stem cells to raise awareness and educate the public, my #stemcellresolution is to use this forum to spread the news – what I do best – about this fun and important challenge.”

Read Stacey’s full blog here.


 Thank you and see you next year!

Science communications is a vital tool that scientists and science enthusiasts need to leverage now more than ever to support stem cell research. Speaking out through social media or blogs is a great way to do this, and I want to congratulate all those that participated this year. I’m grateful for your support!

We look forward to doing this again next year and this time, you’ll have an entire year to ponder your next #StemCellResolution.

Curing the Incurable through Definitive Medicine

“Curing the Incurable”. That was the theme for the first annual Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine (CDCM) Symposium held last week at Stanford University, in Palo Alto, California.

The CDCM is a joint initiative amongst Stanford Healthcare, Stanford Children’s Health and the Stanford School of Medicine. Its mission is to foster an environment that accelerates the development and translation of cell and gene therapies into clinical trials.

The research symposium focused on “the exciting first-in-human cell and gene therapies currently under development at Stanford in bone marrow, skin, cardiac, neural, pancreatic and neoplastic diseases.” These talks were organized into four different sessions: cell therapies for neurological disorders, stem cell-derived tissue replacement therapies, genome-edited cell therapies and anti-cancer cell-based therapies.

A few of the symposium speakers are CIRM-funded grantees, and we’ll briefly touch on their talks below.

Targeting cancer

The keynote speaker was Irv Weissman, who talked about hematopoietic or blood-forming stem cells and their value as a cell therapy for patients with blood disorders and cancer. One of the projects he discussed is a molecule called CD47 that is found on the surface of cancer cells. He explained that CD47 appears on all types of cancer cells more abundantly than on normal cells and is a promising therapeutic target for cancer.

Irv Weissman

Irv Weissman

“CD47 is the first gene whose overexpression is common to all cancer. We know it’s molecular mechanism from which we can develop targeted therapies. This would be impossible without collaborations between clinicians and scientists.”

 

At the end of his talk, Weissman acknowledged the importance of CIRM’s funding for advancing an antibody therapeutic targeting CD47 into a clinical trial for solid cancer tumors. He said CIRM’s existence is essential because it “funds [stem cell-based] research through the [financial] valley of death.” He further explained that CIRM is the only funding entity that takes basic stem cell research all the way through the clinical pipeline into a therapy.

Improving bone marrow transplants

judith shizuru

Judith Shizuru

Next, we heard a talk from Judith Shizuru on ways to improve current bone-marrow transplantation techniques. She explained how this form of stem cell transplant is “the most powerful form of cell therapy out there, for cancers or deficiencies in blood formation.” Inducing immune system tolerance, improving organ transplant outcomes in patients, and treating autoimmune diseases are all applications of bone marrow transplants. But this technique also carries with it toxic and potentially deadly side effects, including weakening of the immune system and graft vs host disease.

Shizuru talked about her team’s goal of improving the engraftment, or survival and integration, of bone marrow stem cells after transplantation. They are using an antibody against a molecule called CD117 which sits on the surface of blood stem cells and acts as an elimination signal. By blocking CD117 with an antibody, they improved the engraftment of bone marrow stem cells in mice and also removed the need for chemotherapy treatment, which is used to kill off bone marrow stem cells in the host. Shizuru is now testing her antibody therapy in a CIRM-funded clinical trial in humans and mentioned that this therapy has the potential to treat a wide variety of diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemias, and multiple sclerosis.

Tackling stroke and heart disease

img_1327We also heard from two CIRM-funded professors working on cell-based therapies for stroke and heart disease. Gary Steinberg’s team is using human neural progenitor cells, which develop into cells of the brain and spinal cord, to treat patients who’ve suffered from stroke. A stroke cuts off the blood supply to the brain, causing the death of brain cells and consequently the loss of function of different parts of the body.  He showed emotional videos of stroke patients whose function and speech dramatically improved following the stem cell transplant. One of these patients was Sonia Olea, a young woman in her 30’s who lost the ability to use most of her right side following her stroke. You can read about her inspiring recover post stem cell transplant in our Stories of Hope.

Dr. Joe Wu. (Image Source: Sean Culligan/OZY)

Dr. Joe Wu. (Image Source: Sean Culligan/OZY)

Joe Wu followed with a talk on adult stem cell therapies for heart disease. His work, which is funded by a CIRM disease team grant, involves making heart cells called cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells and transplanting these cells into patient with end stage heart failure to improve heart function. His team’s work has advanced to the point where Wu said they are planning to file for an investigational new drug (IND) application with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in six months. This is the crucial next step before a treatment can be tested in clinical trials. Joe ended his talk by making an important statement about expectations on how long it will take before stem cell treatments are available to patients.

He said, “Time changes everything. It [stem cell research] takes time. There is a lot of promise for the future of stem cell therapy.”

Stories that caught our eye: stem cell transplants help put MS in remission; unlocking the cause of autism; and a day to discover what stem cells are all about

multiple-sclerosis

Motor neurons

Stem cell transplants help put MS in remission: A combination of high dose immunosuppressive therapy and transplant of a person’s own blood stem cells seems to be a powerful tool in helping people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) go into sustained remission.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder where the body’s own immune system attacks the brain and spinal cord, causing a wide variety of symptoms including overwhelming fatigue, blurred vision and mobility problems. RRMS is the most common form of MS, affecting up to 85 percent of people, and is characterized by attacks followed by periods of remission.

The HALT-MS trial, which was sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), took the patient’s own blood stem cells, gave the individual chemotherapy to deplete their immune system, then returned the blood stem cells to the patient. The stem cells created a new blood supply and seemed to help repair the immune system.

Five years after the treatment, most of the patients were still in remission, despite not taking any medications for MS. Some people even recovered some mobility or other capabilities that they had lost due to the disease.

In a news release, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of NIAID, said anything that holds the disease at bay and helps people avoid taking medications is important:

“These extended findings suggest that one-time treatment with HDIT/HCT may be substantially more effective than long-term treatment with the best available medications for people with a certain type of MS. These encouraging results support the development of a large, randomized trial to directly compare HDIT/HCT to standard of care for this often-debilitating disease.”

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Scripps Research Institute

Using stem cells to model brain development disorders. (Karen Ring) CIRM-funded scientists from the Scripps Research Institute are interested in understanding how the brain develops and what goes wrong to cause intellectual disabilities like Fragile X syndrome, a genetic disease that is a common cause of autism spectrum disorder.

Because studying developmental disorders in humans is very difficult, the Scripps team turned to stem cell models for answers. This week, in the journal Brain, they published a breakthrough in our understanding of the early stages of brain development. They took induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), made from cells from Fragile X syndrome patients, and turned these cells into brain cells called neurons in a cell culture dish.

They noticed an obvious difference between Fragile X patient iPSCs and healthy iPSCs: the patient stem cells took longer to develop into neurons, a result that suggests a similar delay in fetal brain development. The neurons from Fragile X patients also had difficulty forming synaptic connections, which are bridges that allow for information to pass from one neuron to another.

Scripps Research professor Jeanne Loring said that their findings could help to identify new drug therapies to treat Fragile X syndrome. She explained in a press release;

“We’re the first to see that these changes happen very early in brain development. This may be the only way we’ll be able to identify possible drug treatments to minimize the effects of the disorder.”

Looking ahead, Loring and her team will apply their stem cell model to other developmental diseases. She said, “Now we have the tools to ask the questions to advance people’s health.”

A Day to Discover What Stem Cells Are All about.  (Karen Ring) Everyone is familiar with the word stem cells, but do they really know what these cells are and what they are capable of? Scientists are finding creative ways to educate the public and students about the power of stem cells and stem cell research. A great example is the University of Southern California (USC), which is hosting a Stem Cell Day of Discovery to educate middle and high school students and their families about stem cell research.

The event is this Saturday at the USC Health Sciences Campus and will feature science talks, lab tours, hands-on experiments, stem cell lab video games, and a resource fair. It’s a wonderful opportunity for families to engage in science and also to expose young students to science in a fun and engaging way.

Interest in Stem Cell Day has been so high that the event has already sold out. But don’t worry, there will be another stem cell day next year. And for those of you who don’t live in Southern California, mark your calendars for the 2017 Stem Cell Awareness Day on Wednesday, October 11th. There will be stem cell education events all over California and in other parts of the country during that week in honor of this important day.

 

 

Growing a rat pancreas in a mouse with stem cells & CRISPR: a solution for the organ shortage crisis?

Right now, about 120,000 Americans are on a waiting list for an organ transplant and 22 will die today before any organs become available. The plain truth is there aren’t enough organ donors to meet the demand. And according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the number of available organ donors has remained static over the past decade. How can we overcome this crisis?

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The need for organ transplants is growing but the number of donors is stagnant. Image: U.S. Dept. Human Health Services

One answer may be stem cells. These “blank slate” cells can specialize into virtually any cell type in the body which has many scientists pursuing the holy grail of stem cell research: creating an unlimited supply of human organs. Today, a team of Salk Institute scientists report in Cell that they’ve taken an early but important step toward that goal by showing it’s possible to grow rat organs within a mouse. The results bode well for not only organ transplants but also for the study of human development and disease.

Chimera – monster or medical marvel?
Our regular Stem Cellar readers will be familiar with several fascinating studies using stem cell-based 3D bioprinters or bioscaffolds which aim to one day enable the manufacturing of human tissues and organs. Instead of taking this engineering approach, the Salk team seeks a strategy in which chimeric animals are bred to grow human organs. The term “chimeric” is borrowed from Greek mythology that told tales of the chimera, a monster with a lion’s heads, a goat’s body and a serpent’s tail.

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The chimera of Greek Mythology: part lion, goat and snake. Image: Wikimedia Commons

The team’s first set of experiments explored the feasibility of this method by first focusing on rat-mouse chimeras. Reprogramming skin cells collected from rat tails, the scientists generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – cells with the embryonic stem cell-like ability to become any cell type – and injected them into very early stage mouse embryos. The embryos were then implanted into surrogate female mice and successfully carried to term. Examination of the resulting mouse pups showed that their tissues and organs contained a patchwork of both rat and mouse cells.

And for my next trick, I will make a rat pancreas in a mouse
Now, if the ultimate goal is to grow organs that are 100% human in a host animal, an organ that merely has a random patchwork human cells would miss the mark. To show there’s a way around this problem, the Salk team used the CRISPR gene-editing technique to generate mouse embryos that lacked a gene that’s critical for the development of the pancreas. Without the gene, no pancreas forms and the mice died shortly after birth. But when the rat iPSCs were integrated into the gene edited mice embryos, the rat cells picked up the slack as the embryo developed, resulting in chimeric mice with rat pancreases.

Using the same CRISPR gene editing strategy, the researchers also grew rat hearts, and if you can believe it, rat eyes in the chimeric mice. On top of that, the mice in these experiments were healthy with most reaching adulthood and one living two years, an elderly age for mice.

A first step toward growing patient-specific human organs in large animals
One small, actually big, problem is that mice are much too little to serve as chimeric hosts for human organs. So the team repeated these mixed species experiments in pigs which are much better matched to humans. In this case, they added human iPSCs to the pig embryos, implanted them into female pigs and let the embryos develop for four weeks. Although it wasn’t as efficient as the rat-mouse chimeras, the researchers did indeed observe human cells that had incorporated into the chimera and were showing the early signs of specializing in different cell types within the implanted pig embryos.

This work is the first time human iPSCs have been incorporated into large animal species (they also got it to work with cattle) and many years of lab work remain before this approach can help solves the organ shortage crisis. But the potential applications are spellbinding. Imagine a patient in need of an organ transplant: a small skin biopsy is collected to make iPSCs and, using this chimeric animal approach, a patient-derived organ could be grown.

Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study’s team leader, talked about this possibility and more in a press release:

“Of course, the ultimate goal of chimeric research is to learn whether we can use stem-cell and gene-editing technologies to generate genetically-matched human tissues and organs, and we are very optimistic that continued work will lead to eventual success. But in the process we are gaining a better understanding of species evolution as well as human embryogenesis and disease that is difficult to get in other ways.”

Ethical concerns
Now, if the idea of breeding pigs or cows with human organs make you a little uneasy, you aren’t alone.  In fact, the National Institutes of Health announced in 2015 that they had halted funding research that introduces human stem cells into other animals. They want more time “to evaluate the state of the science in this area, the ethical issues that should be considered, and the relevant animal welfare concerns associated with these types of studies.”  To read more discussion on this topic, read this MIT Technology Review article from a year ago.

 

Good news from Asterias’ CIRM-funded spinal cord injury trial

This week in the stem cell field, all eyes are on Asterias Biotherapeutics, a California-based company that’s testing a stem cell based-therapy in a CIRM-funded clinical trial for spinal cord injury patients. The company launched its Phase 1/2a clinical trial back in 2014 with the goal of determining the safety of the therapy and the optimal dose of AST-OPC1 cells to transplant into patients.

astopc1AST-OPC1 cells are oligodendrocyte progenitor cells derived from embryonic stem cells. These are cells located in the brain and spinal cord that develop into support cells that help nerve cells function and communicate with each other.

Asterias is transplanting AST-OPC1 cells into patients that have recently suffered from severe spinal cord injuries in their neck. This type of injury leaves patients paralyzed without any feeling from their neck down. By transplanting cells that can help the nerve cells at the injury site reform their connections, Asterias hopes that their treatment will allow patients to regain some form of movement and feeling.

And it seems that their hope is turning into reality. Yesterday, Asterias reported in a news release that five patients who received a dose of 10 million cells showed improvements in their ability to move after six months after their treatment. All five patients improved one level on the motor function scale, while one patient improved by two levels. A total of six patients received the 10 million cell dose, but so far only five of them have completed the six-month follow-up study, three of which have completed the nine-month follow-up study.

We’ve profiled two of these six patients previously on the Stem Cellar. Kris Boesen was the first patient treated with 10 million cells and has experienced the most improvement. He has regained the use of his hands and arms and can now feed himself and lift weights. Local high school student, Jake Javier, was the fifth patient in this part of the trial, and you can read about his story here.

Kris Boesen, CIRM spinal cord injury clinical trial patient.

Kris Boesen, CIRM spinal cord injury clinical trial patient.

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Jake Javier and his Mom

The lead investigator on this trial, Dr. Richard Fessler, explained the remarkable progress that these patients have made since their treatment:

“With these patients, we are seeing what we believe are meaningful improvements in their ability to use their arms, hands and fingers at six months and nine months following AST-OPC1 administration. Recovery of upper extremity motor function is critically important to patients with complete cervical spinal cord injuries, since this can dramatically improve quality of life and their ability to live independently.”

Asterias will continue to monitor these patients for changes or improvements in movement and will give an update when these patients have passed the 12-month mark since their transplant. However, these encouraging preliminary results have prompted the company to look ahead towards advancing their treatment down the regulatory approval pathway, out of clinical trials and into patients.

Asterias CEO, Steve Cartt, commented,

Steve Cartt, CEO of Asterias Biotherapeutics

Steve Cartt, CEO of Asterias Biotherapeutics

“These results to date are quite encouraging, and we look forward to initiating discussions with the FDA in mid-2017 to begin to determine the most appropriate clinical and regulatory path forward for this innovative therapy.”

 

Talking with the US FDA will likely mean that Asterias will need to show further proof that their stem cell-based therapy actually improves movement in patients, rather than the patients spontaneously regaining movement (which has been observed in patients before). FierceBiotech made this point in a piece they published yesterday on this trial.

“Those discussions with FDA could lead to a more rigorous examination of the effect of AST-OPC1. Some patients with spinal injury experience spontaneous recovery. Asterias has put together matched historical data it claims show “a meaningful difference in the motor function recovery seen to date in patients treated with the 10 million cell dose of AST-OPC1.” But the jury will remain out until Asterias pushes ahead with plans to run a randomized controlled trial.”

In the meantime, Asterias is testing a higher dose of 20 million AST-OPC1 cells in a separate group of spinal cord injury patients. They believe this number is the optimal dose of cells for achieving the highest motor improvement in patients.

2017 will bring more results and hopefully more good news about Asterias’ clinical trial for spinal cord injury. And as always, we’ll keep you informed with any updates on our Stem Cellar Blog.