How research on a rare disease turned into a faster way to make stem cells

Forest Gump. (Paramount Pictures)

Forest Gump. (Paramount Pictures)

If Forest Gump were a scientist, I’d like to think he would have said his iconic line a little differently. Dr. Gump would have said, “scientific research is like a box of chocolates – you never know what you’re gonna get.”

A new CIRM-funded study coming out of the Gladstone Institutes certainly proves this point. Published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study found that a specific genetic mutation known to cause a rare disease called fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) makes it easier to reprogram adult skin cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

Shinya Yamanaka received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 2012 for his seminal discovery of the iPSC technology, which enabled scientists to generate patient specific pluripotent stem cell lines from adult cells like skin and blood. These iPSC lines are useful for modeling disease in a dish, identifying new therapeutic drugs, and potentially for clinical applications in patients. However, one of the rate-limiting steps to this technology is the inefficient process of making iPSCs.

Yamanaka, a senior investigator at Gladstone, knows this problem all too well. In a Gladstone news release he commented, “inefficiency in creating iPSCs is a major roadblock toward applying this technology to biomedicine. Our study identified a surprising way to increase the number of iPSCs that we can generate.”

So how did Yamanaka and his colleagues discover this new trick for making iPSCs more efficiently? Originally, their intentions were to model a rare genetic disease called FOP. It’s commonly known as “stone man syndrome” because the disease converts normal muscle and connective tissue into bone either spontaneously or spurred by injury. Bone growth begins at a young age starting at the neck and progressively moving down the body. Because there is no treatment or cure, patients typically have a lifespan of only 40 years.

The Gladstone team wanted to understand this rare disease better by modeling it in a dish using iPSCs generated from patients with FOP. These patients had a genetic mutation in the ACVR1 gene, which plays an important role in the development of the embryo. FOP patients have a mutant form of ACVR1 that overstimulates this developmental pathway and boosts the activity of a protein called BMP (bone morphogenic protein). When BMP signaling is ramped up, they discovered that they could produce significantly more iPSCs from the skin cells of FOP patients compared to normal, healthy skin cells.

First author on the study, Yohei Hayashi, explained their hypothesis for why this mutation makes it easier to generate iPSCs:

“Originally, we wanted to establish a disease model for FOP that might help us understand how specific gene mutations affect bone formation. We were surprised to learn that cells from patients with FOP reprogrammed much more efficiently than cells from healthy patients. We think this may be because the same pathway that causes bone cells to proliferate also helps stem cells to regenerate.”

To be sure that enhanced BMP signaling caused by the ACVR1 mutation was the key to generating more iPSCs, they blocked this signal and discovered that much fewer iPSCs were made from FOP patient skin cells.

Senior Investigator Bruce Conklin, who was a co-author on this study, succinctly summarized the importance of their findings:

“This is the first reported case showing that a naturally occurring genetic mutation improves the efficiency of iPSC generation. Creating iPSCs from patient cells carrying genetic mutations is not only useful for disease modeling, but can also offer new insights into the reprogramming process.”

Gladstone investigators Bruce Conklin and Shinya Yamanaka. (Photo courtesy of Chris Goodfellow, Gladstone Institutes)

Gladstone investigators Bruce Conklin and Shinya Yamanaka. (Photo courtesy of Chris Goodfellow, Gladstone Institutes)

Ingenious CIRM-funded stem cell approach to treating ALS gets go-ahead to start clinical trial


Clive Svendsen

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, was first identified way back in 1869 but today, more than 150 years later, there are still no effective treatments for it. Now a project, funded by CIRM, has been given approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to start a clinical trial that could help change that.

Clive Svendsen and his team at Cedars-Sinai are about to start a clinical trial they hope will help slow down the progression of the disease. And they are doing it in a particularly ingenious way. More on that in a minute.

First, let’s start with ALS itself. It’s a particularly nasty, rapidly progressing disease that destroys motor neurons, those are the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control movement. People with ALS lose the ability to speak, eat, move and finally, breathe. The average life expectancy after diagnosis is just 3 – 4 years. It’s considered an orphan disease because it affects only around 30,000 people in the US; but even with those relatively low numbers that means that every 90 minutes someone in the US is diagnosed with ALS, and every 90 minutes someone in the US dies of ALS.

Ingenious approach

In this clinical trial the patients will serve as their own control group. Previous studies have shown that the rate of deterioration of muscle movement in the legs of a person with ALS is the same for both legs. So Svendsen and his team will inject specially engineered stem cells into a portion of the spine that controls movement on just one side of the body. Neither the patient nor the physician will know which side has received the cells. This enables the researchers to determine if the treated leg is deteriorating at a slower rate than the untreated leg.

The stem cells being injected have been engineered to produce a protein called glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) that helps protect motor neurons. Svendsen and the team hope that by providing extra GDNF they’ll be able to protect the motor neurons and keep them alive.

Reaching a milestone

In a news release announcing the start of the trial, Svendsen admitted ALS is a tough disease to tackle:

“Any time you’re trying to treat an incurable disease, it is a long shot, but we believe the rationale behind our new approach is strong.”

Diane Winokur, the CIRM Board patient advocate for ALS, says this is truly a milestone:

“In the last few years, thanks to new technologies, increased interest, and CIRM support, we finally seem to be seeing some encouraging signs in the research into ALS. Dr. Svendsen has been at the forefront of this effort for the 20 years I have followed his work.  I commend him, Cedars-Sinai, and CIRM.  On behalf of those who have suffered through this cruel disease and their families and caregivers, I am filled with hope.”

You can read more about Clive Svendsen’s long journey to this moment here.


Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Blood stem cells on a diet, Bladder control after spinal cord injuries, new ALS insights

Putting blood stem cells on a diet. (Karen Ring)


Valine. Image: BMRB

Scientists from Stanford and the University of Tokyo have figured out a new way to potentially make bone marrow transplants more safe. Published yesterday in the journal Science, the teams discovered that removing an essential amino acid, called valine, from the diets of mice depleted their blood stem cells and made it easier for them to receive bone marrow transplants from other mice without the need for radiation or chemotherapy. Removing valine from human blood stem cells yielded similar results suggesting that this therapeutic approach could potentially change and improve the way that certain cancer patients are treated.

In an interview with Science Magazine, senior author Satoshi Yamazaki explained how current bone marrow transplants are toxic to patients and that an alternative, safer form of treatment is needed.

“Bone marrow transplantation is a toxic therapy. We have to do it to treat diseases that would otherwise be fatal, but the quality of life afterward is often not good. Relative to chemotherapy or radiation, the toxicity of a diet deficient in valine seems to be much, much lower. Mice that have been irradiated look terrible. They can’t have babies and live for less than a year. But mice given a diet deficient in valine can have babies and will live a normal life span after transplantation.”

The scientists found that the effects of a valine-deficient diet were mostly specific to blood stem cells in the mice, but also did affect hair stem cells and some T cells. The effects on these other populations of cells were not as dramatic however as the effects on blood stem cells.

Going forward, the teams are interested to find out whether valine deficiency will be a useful treatment for leukemia stem cells, which are stem cells that give rise to a type of blood cancer. As mentioned before, this alternative form of treatment would be very valuable for certain cancer patients in comparison to the current regimen of radiation treatment before bone marrow transplantation.

Easing pain and improving bladder control in spinal cord injury (Kevin McCormack)
When most people think of spinal cord injuries (SCI) they focus on the inability to walk. But for people with those injuries there are many other complications such as intense nerve or neuropathic pain, and inability to control their bladder. A CIRM-funded study from researchers at UCSF may help point at a new way of addressing those problems.

The study, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, zeroed in on the loss in people with SCI of a particular amino acid called GABA, which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and inhibits nerve transmission in the brain, calming nervous activity.

Here’s where we move into alphabet soup, but stick with me. Previous studies showed that using cells called inhibitory interneuron precursors from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) helped boost GABA signaling in the brain and spinal cord. So the researchers turned some human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into MGEs and transplanted those into the spinal cords of mice with SCI.

Six months after transplantation those cells had integrated into the mice’s spinal cord, and the mice not only showed improved bladder function but they also seemed to have less pain.

Now, it’s a long way from mice to men, and there’s a lot of work that has to be done to ensure that this is safe to try in people, but the researchers conclude: “Our findings, therefore, may have implications for the treatment of chronically spinal cord-injured patients.”

CIRM-funded study reveals potential new ALS drug target (Todd Dubnicoff)
Of the many diseases CIRM-funded researchers are tackling, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, has got to be one of the worst.


Motor neurons derived from skin cells of a healthy donor
Image: UC San Diego

This neurodegenerative disorder attacks and kills motor neurons, the nerve cells that control voluntary muscle movement. People diagnosed with ALS, gradually lose the ability to move their limbs, to swallow and even to breathe. The disease is always fatal and people usually die within 3 to 5 years after initial diagnosis. There’s no cure for ALS mainly because scientists are still struggling to fully understand what causes it.

Stem cell-derived “disease in a dish” experiments have recently provided many insights into the underlying biology of ALS. In these studies, skin cells from ALS patients are reprogrammed into an embryonic stem cell-like state called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCS). These iPS cells are grown in petri dishes and then specialized into motor neurons, allowing researchers to carefully look for any defects in the cells.

This week, a UC San Diego research team using this disease in a dish strategy reported they had uncovered a cellular process that goes haywire in ALS cells. The researchers generated motor neurons from iPS cells that had been derived from the skin samples of ALS patients with hereditary forms of the disease as well as samples from healthy donors. The team then compared the activity of thousands of genes between the ALS and healthy motor neurons. They found that a particular hereditary mutation doesn’t just impair a protein called hnRNP A2/B1, it actually gives the protein new toxic activities that kill off the motor neurons.

Fernando Martinez, the first author on this study in Neuron, told the UC San Diego Health newsroom that these news results reveal an important context for their on-going development of therapeutics that target proteins like hnRNP:

“These … therapies [targeting hnRNP] can eliminate toxic proteins and treat disease. But this strategy is only viable if the proteins have gained new toxic functions through mutation, as we found here for hnRNP A2/B1 in these ALS cases.”

Know Your Stem Cell History with Gladstone’s Interactive Timeline Tool

Stem cell biology is such a young area of research. It was only in 1998 that the first human embryonic stem cell line was generated by Jamie Thomson. A dizzying amount of breakthrough research has occurred in that short span of time, including the Nobel Prize winning work of Shinya Yamanaka for devising a method for reprogramming adult cells into an embryonic stem cell-like state (aka the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cell technique). Because of the compressed time frame of these discoveries, it’s hard to keep track of the key highlights and the order in which they occurred. And there are plenty of fundamental, decades-old studies which our non-scientist stem cell champions may not be aware of.


The Gladstone’s stem cell timeline tool is fun and informative. Check it out!

That’s where the Gladstone Institutes’ new online stem cell timeline comes to the rescue. Released on October 12th, in celebration of Stem Cell Awareness Day, as well as the tenth anniversary of iPS cells, the timeline has a nifty interactive feature that allows you to swipe through a quick glance of the key milestones over the years. Then, simply tapping on a particular event gives you more detailed information. Check out it on the Gladstone Institutes website. Who knows, it might come in handy at your next pub trivia night or your next crossword puzzle.


Eggciting News: Scientists developed fertilized eggs from mouse stem cells

A really eggciting science story came out early this week that’s received a lot of attention. Scientists in Japan reported in the journal Nature that they’ve generated egg cells from mouse stem cells, and these eggs could be fertilized and developed into living, breathing mice.

This is the first time that scientists have reported the successful development of egg cells in the lab outside of an animal. Many implications emerge from this research like gaining a better understanding of human development, generating egg cells from other types of mammals and even helping infertile women become pregnant.

Making eggs from pluripotent stem cells

The egg cells, also known as oocytes, were generated from mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells derived from mouse skin cells in a culture dish. Both stem cell types are pluripotent, meaning that they can generate almost any cell type in the human body.

After generating the egg cells, the scientists fertilized the eggs through in vitro fertilization (IVF) using sperm from a healthy male mouse. They allowed the fertilized eggs to grow into two cell embryos which they then transplanted into female mice. 11 out of 316 embryos (or 3.5%) produced offspring, which were then able to reproduce after they matured into adults.


These mice were born from artificial eggs that were made from stem cells in a dish. (K. Hayashi, Kyushu University)

Not perfect science

While impressive, this study did identify major issues with its egg-making technique. First, less than 5% of the embryos made from the stem-cell derived eggs developed into viable mice. Second, the scientists discovered that some of their lab-grown eggs (~18%) had abnormal numbers of chromosomes – an event that can prevent an embryo from developing or can cause genetic disorders in offspring.

Lastly, to generate mature egg cells, the scientists had to add cells taken from mouse embryos in pregnant mice to the culture dish. These outside cells acted as a support environment that helped the egg cells mature and were essential for their development. The scientists are working around this issue by developing artificial reagents that could hopefully replace the need for these cells.

Egg cells made from embryonic stem cells in a dish. (K. Hayashi, Kyushu University)

Egg cells made from embryonic stem cells in a dish. (K. Hayashi, Kyushu University)

Will human eggs be next?

A big discovery such as this one immediately raises ethical questions and concerns about whether scientists will attempt to generate artificial human egg cells in a dish. Such technology would be extremely valuable to women who do not have eggs or have problems getting pregnant. However, in the wrong hands, a lot could go wrong with this technology including the creation of genetically abnormal embryos.

In a Nature news release, Azim Surani who is well known in this area of research, said that these ethical issues should be discussed now and include the general public. “This is the right time to involve the wider public in these discussions, long before and in case the procedure becomes feasible in humans.”

In an interview with , James Adjaye, another expert from Heinrich Heine University in Germany, raised the point that even if we did generate artificial human eggs, “the final and ultimate test for fully functional human ‘eggs in a dish’ would be the fertilization using IVF, which is also ethically not allowed.”

Looking forward, senior author on the Nature study, Katsuhiko Hayashi, predicted that in a decade, lab-grown “oocyte-like” human eggs will be available but probably not at a scale for fertility treatments. Because of the technical issues his study revealed, he commented, “It is too preliminary to use artificial oocytes in the clinic.”

Creating a “Pitching Machine” to speed up our delivery of stem cell treatments to patients


When baseball players are trying to improve their hitting they’ll use a pitching machine to help them fine tune their stroke. Having a device that delivers a ball at a consistent speed can help a batter be more consistent and effective in their swing, and hopefully get more hits.

That’s what we are hoping our new Translating and Accelerating Centers will do. We call these our “Pitching Machine”, because we hope they’ll help researchers be better prepared when they apply to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval to start a clinical trial, and be more efficient and effective in the way they set up and run that clinical trial once they get approval.

The CIRM Board approved the Accelerating Center earlier this summer. The $15 million award went to QuintilesIMS, a leading integrated information and technology-enabled healthcare service provider.

The Accelerating Center will provide key core services for researchers who have been given approval to run a clinical trial, including:

  • Regulatory support and management services
  • Clinical trial operations and management services
  • Data management, biostatistical and analytical services

The reason why these kinds of service are needed is simple, as Randy Mills, our President and CEO explained at the time:

“Many scientists are brilliant researchers but have little experience or expertise in navigating the regulatory process; this Accelerating Center means they don’t have to develop those skills; we provide them for them.”

The Translating Center is the second part of the “Pitching Machine”. That is due to go to our Board for a vote tomorrow. This is an innovative new center that will support the stem cell research, manufacturing, preclinical safety testing, and other activities needed to successfully apply to the FDA for approval to start a clinical trial.

The Translating Center will:

  • Provide consultation and guidance to researchers about the translational process for their stem cell product.
  • Initiate, plan, track, and coordinate activities necessary for preclinical Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling development projects.
  • Conduct preclinical research activities, including pivotal pharmacology and toxicology studies.
  • Manufacture stem cell and gene modified stem cell products under the highest quality standards for use in preclinical and clinical studies.

The two centers will work together, helping researchers create a comprehensive development plan for every aspect of their project.

For the researchers this is important in giving them the support they need. For the FDA it could also be useful in ensuring that the applications they get from CIRM-funded projects are consistent, high quality and meet all their requirements.

We want to do everything we can to ensure that when a CIRM-funded therapy is ready to start a clinical trial that its application is more likely to be a hit with the FDA, and not to strike out.

Just as batting practice is crucial to improving performance in baseball, we are hoping our “Pitching Machine” will raise our game to the next level, and enable us to deliver some game-changing treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.


Trash talking and creating a stem cell community


Imilce Rodriguez-Fernandez likes to talk trash. No, really, she does. In her case it’s cellular trash, the kind that builds up in our cells and has to be removed to ensure the cells don’t become sick.

Imilce was one of several stem cell researchers who took part in a couple of public events over the weekend, on either side of San Francisco Bay, that served to span both a geographical and generational divide and create a common sense of community.

The first event was at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Marin County, near San Francisco. It was titled “Stem Cell Celebration” and that’s pretty much what it was. It featured some extraordinary young scientists from the Buck talking about the work they are doing in uncovering some of the connections between aging and chronic diseases, and coming up with solutions to stop or even reverse some of those changes.

One of those scientists was Imilce. She explained that just as it is important for people to get rid of their trash so they can have a clean, healthy home, so it is important for our cells to do the same. Cells that fail to get rid of their protein trash become sick, unhealthy and ultimately stop working.

Imilce is exploring the cellular janitorial services our bodies have developed to deal with trash, and trying to find ways to enhance them so they are more effective, particularly as we age and those janitorial services aren’t as efficient as they were in our youth.

Unlocking the secrets of premature aging

Chris Wiley, another postdoctoral researcher at the Buck, showed that some medications that are used to treat HIV may be life-saving on one level, preventing the onset of full-blown AIDS, but that those benefits come with a cost, namely premature aging. Chris said the impact of aging doesn’t just affect one cell or one part of the body, but ripples out affecting other cells and other parts of the body. By studying the impact those medications have on our bodies he’s hoping to find ways to maintain the benefits of those drugs, but get rid of the downside.

Creating a Community


Across the Bay, the U.C. Berkeley Student Society for Stem Cell Research held it’s 4th annual conference and the theme was “Culturing a Stem Cell Community.”

The list of speakers was a Who’s Who of CIRM-funded scientists from U.C. Davis’ Jan Nolta and Paul Knoepfler, to U.C. Irvine’s Henry Klassen and U.C. Berkeley’s David Schaffer. The talks ranged from progress in fighting blindness, to how advances in stem cell gene editing are cause for celebration, and concern.

What struck me most about both meetings was the age divide. At the Buck those presenting were young scientists, millennials; the audience was considerably older, baby boomers. At UC Berkeley it was the reverse; the presenters were experienced scientists of the baby boom generation, and the audience were keen young students representing the next generation of scientists.

Bridging the divide

But regardless of the age differences there was a shared sense of involvement, a feeling that regardless of which side of the audience we are on we all have something in common, we are all part of the stem cell community.

All communities have a story, something that helps bind them together and gives them a sense of common purpose. For the stem cell community there is not one single story, there are many. But while those stories all start from a different place, they end up with a common theme; inspiration, determination and hope.


Stem cell stories that caught our eye: relief for jaw pain, vitamins for iPSCs and Alzheimer’s insights

Jaw bone stem cells may offer relief for suffers of painful joint disorder
An estimated 10 million people in the US – mostly women –  suffer from problems with their temporomandibular joint (TMJ) which sits between the jaw bone and skull. TMJ disorders can lead to a number of symptoms such as intense pain in the jaw, face and head; difficulty swallowing and talking; and dizziness.

ds00355_im00012_mcdc7_tmj_jpgThe TMJ is made up of fibrocartilage which, when healthy, acts as a cushion to enable a person to move their jaw smoothly. But this cartilage doesn’t have the capacity to heal or regenerate so treatments including surgery and pain killers only mask the symptoms without fixing the underlying damage of the joint.

Reporting this week in Nature Communications, researchers at Columbia University’s College of Dental Medicine identified stem cells within the TMJ that can form cartilage and bone – in cell culture studies as well as in animals. The research team further showed that the signaling activity of a protein called Wnt leads to a reduction of these fibrocartilage stem cells (FSCSs) in animals and as a result causes deterioration of cartilage. But injecting a known inhibitor of Wnt into the animals’ damaged TMJ spurred growth and healing of the joint.

The team is now in search of other Wnt inhibitors that could be used in a clinical setting. In a university press release, Jeremy Mao, a co-author on the paper, talked about the implications of these results:

“They suggest that molecular signals that govern stem cells may have therapeutic applications for cartilage and bone regeneration. Cartilage and certain bone defects are notoriously difficult to heal.”

Take your vitamins: good advice for people and iPS cells
From a young age, we’re repeatedly told how getting enough vitamins each day is important for a healthy life. Our bodies don’t produce these naturally occurring chemicals but they carry out critical biochemical activities to keep our cells and organs functioning properly.


Carrots: a great source of vitamin A. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Well, it turns out that vitamins are also an important ingredient in stem cell research labs. Results published the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) this week by scientists in the UK and New Zealand show that vitamin A and C work together synergistically to improve the efficiency of reprogramming adult cells, like skin or blood, into the embryonic stem cell-like state of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

By the time a stem cell has specialized into, let’s say, a skin cell, only skin cell-specific genes are active while others genes, like those needed for liver function, are shut down. Those non-skin genes are silenced through the attachment of chemical tags on the DNA, a process called methylation. It essentially provides the DNA with the means of maintaining a skin cell “memory”. To convert a skin cell back into a stem cell-like state, researchers in the lab must erase this “memory” by adding factors which demethylate, or remove the methylation tags on the silenced, non-skin related genes.

In the current research picked up by Science Daily, the researchers found that both vitamin A and C increase demethylation but in different ways. The study showed that vitamin A acts to increase the production of proteins that are important for demethylation while vitamin C acts to enhance the enzymatic activity of demethylation.

These insights may help add to the growing knowledge on how to most efficiently reprogram adult cells into iPSCs. And they may prove useful for a better understanding of certain cancers which contain cells that are essentially reprogrammed into a stem cell-like state.

New angles for dealing with the tangles in the Alzheimer’s brain
The memory loss and overall degradation of brain function seen in people with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is thought to be caused by the accumulation of amyloid and tau proteins which form plaques and tangles in the brain. These abnormal structures are toxic to brain cells and ultimately lead to cell death.

But other studies of post-mortem AD brains suggest a malfunction in endocytosis – a process of taking up and transporting proteins to different parts of the cell – may also play a role. While follow up studies corroborated this initial observation, they didn’t look at endocytosis in nerve cells so it remained unclear how much of a role it played in AD.

In a CIRM-funded study published this week in Cell Reports, UC San Diego researchers made nerve cells from human iPSCs and used the popular CRISPR and TALEN gene editing techniques to generate mutations seen in inherited forms of AD. One of those inherited mutations is in the PS1 gene which has been shown to play a role in transporting amyloid proteins in nerve cells. The research confirmed that this mutation as well as a mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) led to a breakdown in the proper trafficking of APP within the mutated nerve cells. In fact, they found an accumulation of APP in a wrong area of the nerve cell. However, blocking the action of a protein called secretase that normally processes the APP protein helped restore proper protein transport. In a university press release, team leader Larry Goldstein, explained the importance of these findings:


Larry Goldstein.
Image: UCSD

“Our results further illuminate the complex processes involved in the degradation and decline of neurons, which is, of course, the essential characteristic and cause of AD. But beyond that, they point to a new target and therapy for a condition that currently has no proven treatment or cure.”



Using skin cells to repair damaged hearts


Heart muscle  cells derived from skin cells

When someone has a heart attack, getting treatment quickly can mean the difference between life and death. Every minute delay in getting help means more heart cells die, and that can have profound consequences. One study found that heart attack patients who underwent surgery to re-open blocked arteries within 60 minutes of arriving in the emergency room had a six times greater survival rate than people who had to wait more than 90 minutes for the same treatment.

Clearly a quick intervention can be life-saving, which means an approach that uses a patient’s own stem cells to treat a heart attack won’t work. It simply takes too long to harvest the healthy heart cells, grow them in the lab, and re-inject them into the patient. By then the damage is done.

Now a new study shows that an off-the-shelf approach, using donor stem cells, might be the most effective way to go. Scientists at Shinshu University in Japan, used heart muscle stem cells from one monkey, to repair the damaged hearts of five other monkeys.

In the study, published in the journal Nature, the researchers took skin cells from a macaque monkey, turned those cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and then turned those cells into cardiomyocytes or heart muscle cells. They then transplanted those cardiomyocytes into five other monkeys who had experienced an induced heart attack.

After 3 months the transplanted monkeys showed no signs of rejection and their hearts showed improved ability to contract, meaning they were pumping blood around the body more powerfully and efficiently than before they got the cardiomyocytes.

It’s an encouraging sign but it comes with a few caveats. One is that the monkeys used were all chosen to be as close a genetic match to the donor monkey as possible. This reduced the risk that the animals would reject the transplanted cells. But when it comes to treating people, it may not be feasible to have a wide selection of heart stem cell therapies on hand at every emergency room to make sure they are a good genetic match to the patient.

The second caveat is that all the transplanted monkeys experienced an increase in arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats. However, Yuji Shiba, one of the researchers, told the website ResearchGate that he didn’t think this was a serious issue:

“Ventricular arrhythmia was induced by the transplantation, typically within the first four weeks. However, this post-transplant arrhythmia seems to be transient and non-lethal. All five recipients of [the stem cells] survived without any abnormal behaviour for 12 weeks, even during the arrhythmia. So I think we can manage this side effect in clinic.”

Even with the caveats, this study demonstrates the potential for a donor-based stem cell therapy to treat heart attacks. This supports an approach already being tested by Capricor in a CIRM-funded clinical trial. In this trial the company is using donor cells, derived from heart stem cells, to treat patients who developed heart failure after a heart attack. In early studies the cells appear to reduce scar tissue on the heart, promote blood vessel growth and improve heart function.

The study from Japan shows the possibilities of using a ready-made stem cell approach to helping repair damage caused by a heart attacks. We’re hoping Capricor will take it from a possibility, and turn it into a reality.

If you would like to read some recent blog posts about Capricor go here and here.

Celebrating Stem Cell Awareness Day with SUPER CELLS!


To all you stem cell lovers out there, today is your day! The second Wednesday of October is Stem Cell Awareness Day (SCAD), which brings together organizations and individuals that are working to ensure the general public realizes the benefits of stem cell research.

For patients in desperate need of treatments for diseases without cures, this is also a day to recognize their struggles and the scientific advances in the stem cell field that are bringing us closer to helping these patients.


Induced pluripotent stem cells.

How are people celebrating SCAD?

This year, a number of institutes in California are hosting events in honor of Stem Cell Awareness Day. Members of the CIRM team will be speaking on Saturday about “The Power of Stem Cells” at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato (RSVP on Facebook) and at the Berkeley Student Society for Stem Cell Research Conference in Berkeley (RSVP on Eventbrite). There are also a few SCAD events going on this week in Southern California. You can learn more about these all events on our website.

You can also find out about other SCAD celebrations and events on social media by following the hashtag #StemCellAwarenessDay and #StemCellDay on Twitter.

Super Cells: The Power of Stem Cells

Super Cells exhibit at the Lawrence Hall of Science

Super Cells exhibit at the Lawrence Hall of Science

Today, the CIRM Stem Cellar is celebrating SCAD by sharing our recent visit to the Lawrence Hall of Science, which is currently hosting an exhibit called “Super Cells: The Power of Stem Cells”.

This is a REALLY COOL interactive exhibit that explains what stem cells are, what they do, and how we can harness their power to treat disease and injury. CIRM was one of the partners that helped create this exhibit, so we were especially excited to see it in person.

Super Cells has four “high-tech interactive zones and a comprehensive educational guide for school children ages 6-14”. You can read more details about the exhibit in this promotional handout. Based on my visit to the exhibit, I can easily say­­ that Super Cells will be interesting and informative to any age group.

The exhibit was unveiled on September 28th, and the Hall told us that they have already heard positive reviews from their visitors. We had the opportunity to talk further with Susan Gregory, the Deputy Director of the Hall, and Adam Frost, a marketing specialist, about the Super Cells exhibit. We asked them a few questions and will share their interview below followed by a few fun pictures we took of the exhibit.

Q: Why did the Lawrence Hall of Science decide to host the Super Cells exhibit?

The Lawrence Hall of Science has a history of bringing in exciting and engaging traveling exhibitions, and we were looking for something new to excite our visitors in the Fall season. When the opportunity presented itself to host Super Cells, we thought it would be a good fit for our audience. Additionally, the Hall is increasing its programming and exhibits in the fields of biology, chemistry and bioengineering.

Q: What aspects of the Super Cells exhibit do you think are valuable to younger kids?

We strive to make our exhibit experiences hands-on and interactive. The Hall believes that the best way for kids to learn science is for them to be active in their learning. Super Cells offers a variety of elements that speak to our philosophy of learning and make learning science more fun.

Q: How is exhibit similar or unique to other exhibits you’ve hosted previously?

 The Hall hosts and develops exhibits across a broad range of scientific, engineering, technology and mathematical topics. We are always looking for exhibits that address recent scientific advances, and also try to showcase cutting edge research.

Super Cells presents both basic cell biology and information about recent medical and scientific advances, so it fits. Also, as mentioned in our behind the scenes story about the exhibit install, in the past many of our traveling exhibits were very large experiences that tended to take up a lot of space on the museum floor. One thing that is great about Super Cells is that it packs a lot of information into a relatively small space, allowing us to keep a number of experiences and activities that our audience has come to love on the floor, instead of removing them to make room.

Q: Will there be any special events at the Hall featuring this exhibit?

On November 11, the Hall will host a fun day of activities centered around DNA and the exhibit. Younger visitors will make DNA bracelets based on the unique traits in their genome, while older kids will isolate their own DNA using a swab from inside their cheek. We are still finalizing the details of this event, but it will definitely happen.

Q:  Why do you think it’s important for younger students and the general public to learn about stem cells and stem cell research?

As UC Berkeley’s public science center, the Hall is committed to providing a window into cutting edge research and the latest scientific information. We think it’s really important for people and kids to learn about the skills and science behind current research so they can be prepared for a future of incredible scientific challenges and opportunities that we can’t foresee.

Super Cells will be open at the Lawrence Hall of Science until November 27th, so be sure to check it out before then. If you don’t live in California, don’t worry, Super Cells will be traveling around the U.S., Europe and Canada. You can find out where Super Cells is touring next on their website.

We hope you enjoy our photos of the Super Cells exhibit!