A Noble pursuit; finding the best science to help the most people

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Mark Noble. Photo by Todd Dubnicoff

Mark Noble, Ph.D., is a pioneer in stem cell research and the Director of the University of Rochester Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Institute in New York. He is also a member of CIRM’s Grants Working Group (GWG), the panel of independent scientific experts we use to review research applications for funding and decide which are the most promising.

Mark has been a part of the GWG since 2011. When asked how he came to join the GWG he joked: “I saw an ad on Craigslist and thought it sounded fun.”  But he is not joking when he says it is a labor of love.

“My view is that CIRM is one of the greatest experiments in how to develop a new branch of science and medicine. If you look at ventures, like the establishment of the National Institutes of Health, what you see is that when there is a concentrated effort to achieve an enormous goal, amazing things can happen. And if your goal is to create a new field of medicine you have to take a truly expansive view.”

Mark has been on many other review panels but says they don’t compare to CIRM’s.

“These are the most exciting review panels in which I take part. I don’t know of any comparable panels that bring together experts working across such a wide range of disciplines and diseases.   It’s particularly interesting to be involved in reviews at this stage because we get to look at the fruits of CIRM’s long investment, and at projects that are now in, or well on the way towards, clinical trials.

It’s a wonderful scientific education because you come to these meetings and someone is submitting an application on diabetes and someone else has submitted an application on repairing the damage to the heart or spinal cord injury or they have a device that will allow you to transplant cells better. There are people in the room that are able to talk knowledgeably about each of these areas and understand how the proposed project might work in terms of actual financial development, and how it might work in the corporate sphere and how it fits in to unmet medical needs.  I don’t know of any comparable review panels like this that have such a broad remit and bring together such a breadth of expertise. Every review panel you come to you are getting a scientific education on all these different areas, which is great.”

Another aspect of CIRM’s work that Mark admires is its ability to look past the financial aspects of research, to focus on the bigger goal:

“I like that CIRM recognizes the larger problem, that a therapy that is curative but costs a million dollars a patient is not going to be implemented worldwide. Well, CIRM is not here to make money. CIRM is here to find cures for unmet medical needs, which means that if someone comes in with a great application on a drug that is going to cure some awful disease and it’s not going to be worth a fortune, that is not the main concern. The main concern is that you might be able to cure this disease and yeah, we’ll put up money to help you so that you might be able to get into clinical trials, to get enough information to find out if it works. And to have the vision to go all the way from, ‘ok, you guys, we want you to enter this field, we want you to be interested in therapeutic development, we are going to help you structure the clinical trials, we are going to provide all the Alpha Stem Cell Clinics that can talk to each other to make the clinical trials happen.

The goal of CIRM is to change medicine and these are the approaches that have worked really well in doing this. The CIRM view clearly is:

‘There are 100 horses in this race and every single one that crosses the finish line is a success story.’ That’s what is necessary, because there are so many diseases and injuries for which new approaches are needed.”

Mark says working with CIRM has helped him spread the word back home in New York state:

“I have been very involved in working with the New York state legislature over the years to promote funding for stem cell biology and spinal cord injury research so having the CIRM experience has really helped me to understand what it is that another place can try and accomplish. A lot of the ideas that have been worked out at CIRM have been extremely helpful for statewide scientific enterprises in New York, where we have had people involved in different areas of the state effort talk to people at CIRM to find out what best practice is.”

Mark says he feels as if he has a front row seat to history.

“Seeing the stem cell field grow to its present stage and enhancing the opportunity to address multiple unmet medical needs, is a thrilling adventure. Working with CIRM to help create a better future is a privilege.”

 

Seeing is believing. Proof a CIRM-funded therapy is making a difference

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Thelma, participant in the CAMELLIA clinical trial

You have almost certainly never heard of Thelma, or met her, or know anything about her. She’s a lady living in England who, if it wasn’t for a CIRM-funded therapy, might not be living at all. She’s proof that what we do, is helping people.

Thelma is featured in a video about a treatment for acute myeloid leukemia, one of the most severe forms of blood cancer. Thelma took part in a clinical trial, called CAMELLIA, at Oxford Cancer Centre in Oxford, UK. The clinical trial uses a therapy that blocks a protein called CD47 that is found on the surface of cancer cells, including cancer stem cells which can evade traditional therapies. The video was shot to thank the charity Bloodwise for raising the funds to pay for the trial.

Prof. Paresh Vyas of Oxford University, who was part of the clinical trial team that treated Thelma, says patients with this condition face long odds.

“Patients with acute myeloid leukemia have the most aggressive blood cancer. We really haven’t had good treatments for this condition for the last 40 years.”

While this video was shot in England, featuring English nurses and doctors and patients, the therapy itself was developed here in California, first at Stanford University under the guidance of Irv Weissman and, more recently, at Forty Seven Inc. That company is now about to test their approach in a CIRM-funded clinical trial here in the US.

This is an example of how CIRM doesn’t just fund research, we invest in it. We help support it at every stage, from the earliest research through to clinical trials. Without our early support this work may not have made it this far.

The Forty Seven Inc. therapy uses the patient’s own immune system to help fight back against cancer stem cells. It’s looking very promising. But you don’t have to take our word for it. Take Thelma’s.

Recap of the 2018 Alliance for Regenerative Medicine Cell and Gene Therapy State of the Industry

What happened in the Cell and Gene Therapy sector in 2017, and what should we be looking out for in 2018? Over 500 executives, investors, scientists and patient advocates gathered together yesterday to find out at the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM) State of the Industry Briefing in San Francisco, California.

ARM Chairman, Robert Preti, and ARM CEO, Janet Lynch Lambert, kicked off the session by discussing how 2017 marked an inflection point for the sector. They underscored the approval of three cell/gene therapies (see slide below) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a “bright and robust” future pipeline that should yield over 40 approved therapies in the next five years, and an improving regulatory environment that’s accelerating approvals of regenerative medicine therapies. This year alone, the FDA has granted 12 Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) designations through the 21st Century Cures Act (see slide below for companies/products that received RMAT in 2017).

In 2017, a total of four cell/gene therapies were approved and the US FDA awarded 12 RMAT designations. This slide is from the 2018 ARM Cell and Gene Therapy State of the Industry Briefing presentation.

Next up was a snapshot of the clinical landscape highlighting a total of 946 ongoing clinical trials at the end of 2017, and their breakdown by disease (see chart below). Oncology (cancer) is the clear winner comprising over 50% of the trials while Cardiovascular (heart) took second with 8.6% and diseases of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) took third with 6.5%.

Lambert also gave a brief overview of finances in 2017 and listed some impressive numbers. $7.5 Billion in capital was raised in 2017 compared to $4.2 Billion in 2016. She also mentioned major acquisitions, mergers, partnerships and public financings that paved the way for this year’s successes in cell and gene therapy.

Lambert concluded that while there was significant progress with product approvals, growing public awareness of successes in the sector, regulatory advances and financial maturity, there is a need for further commercial support and a focus on policy making, industrialization and manufacturing.

The Industry Update was followed by two panel sessions.

The first panel focused on cell-based cancer immunotherapies and featured company leaders from Juno Therapeutics, Mustang Bio, Adaptimmune, Novartis, and Fate Therapeutics.

In the cancer field, companies are aggressively pursuing the development of cell-based immunotherapies including Chimeric Antigen Receptor T (CAR-T) cells, modified T-cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells, to name a few. These therapies all involve engineering or modifying human immune cells to identify and target cancer cells that resist first-line cancer treatments like radiation or chemotherapy.

The panelists spoke of a future that involved the development of combination therapies that partner cell-based immunotherapies with other drugs and treatments to better target specific types of cancer. They also spent a significant portion of the panel discussing the issues of manufacturing and reimbursement. On manufacturing, the panel argued that a centralized cell manufacturing approach will be needed to deliver safe products to patients. On reimbursement, they addressed the difficulty of finding a balance between pricing life-saving therapies and navigating reimbursements from insurance companies.

The second panel focused on the state of gene therapy and the outlook for 2018. This panel featured company and academic leaders from CRISPR Therapeutics, Sangamo Therapeutics, BioMarin Pharmaceutical, Adverum Biotechnologies, and the Gladstone Institutes.

ARM Gene Therapy Panel: Martha Rook (MilliporeSigma), Deepak Srivastava (Gladstone Institutes), Amber Salzman (Adverum Biotechnologies), Bill Lundberg (CRISPR Therapeutics), Geoff Nichol (BioMarin Pharmaceutical), Sandy Macrae (Sangamo Therapeutics)

The panel spoke about the difference between gene editing (fixing an existing gene within a cell) and gene therapy (adding a new gene into a cell) technologies and how the delivery of these therapies into tissues and cells is the biggest challenge in the area right now.

Sandy Macrae, President and CEO of Sangamo Therapeutics, made an interesting point when he said that for gene therapy to be successful, companies need to plan two to three years in advance for a phase III trial (the final stage before a product is approved) because manufacturing gene therapies takes a long time. He said the key for success is about having medicines that are ready to launch, not just reporting good results.

Overall, ARM’s State of the Industry provided an exciting overview of the progress made in the Cell and Gene Therapy Sector in 2017 and shared outlooks for 2018 and beyond.

You can access the Live Webcast of ARM’s State of the Industry Briefing including both panel sessions on the ARM website. Be sure to check out our blog featuring our 2018 Stem Cell Conference Guide for more ARM events and other relevant stem cell research meetings in the coming year.

Accelerating stem cell treatments to patients in 2017

As we enter the new year, CIRM’s 2017 Annual Report will be posted in a few short weeks!  Here’s a sneak peek at CIRM’s progress in clinical trials.

2017 CIRM Annual Report

At the start of 2017, we set a goal of finding and funding 12 new, high quality clinical trials. We easily beat that goal, funding 16, in a wide variety of conditions from ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) to cancer and diabetes. That means we have now funded a total of 43 different projects in clinical trials and enrolled more than 700 people in those trials.

Here’s a look at the different kinds of stem cells and diseases are involved in those clinical trials:

Funding those 16 new clinical trials means we have now funded 26 new trials in the last two years, putting us ahead of schedule to meeting our goal of 50 new clinical trials by 2020.

When we fund clinical programs, we truly partner with these programs and give them support – financially, operationally and strategically.

CIRM assists investigators in the application process so they can best articulate their research proposal in a way that can be optimally evaluated by our independent peer review group for funding. By putting applications through a rigorous review process, we select programs with the highest probability of success.  You will hear from one of our GWG members, the external panel that reviews our grants for funding, in the Annual Report.

CIRM provides funding at a critical stage when programs are not yet able to get sufficient funding because they are felt to be “too early” or “too risky” for traditional investors. By funding these investigators to conduct important early work, CIRM “de-risks” the projects, and we have already seen how this has allowed “high risk but high reward” programs to attract investors and commercialization partners. We will feature examples of these follow-on investments in the Annual Report.

In addition to funding clinical trials, CIRM brings in critical expertise and resources for these programs. Clinical Advisory Panels (CAPs), composed of CIRM science officers, external experts and patient representatives, meet on a quarterly basis for each program to help them overcome obstacles and meet project milestones. CIRM has created the Stem Cell Center – a stem cell-specific research organization that helps investigators navigate the best regulatory pathways, provides access manufacturing resources, operational clinical trial support and strategic resources for delivering successful products to patients.

In short, we do everything we can to try and ensure those clinical trials have the best possible chance to be successful.

With a growing number of clinical trials to track, and more on the way, we needed a new tool to make it easier to see, at a glance, the trials we are funding, and all the key details of each program.

So, we created the Clinical Trials Dashboard to let you sort each trial by disease type, researcher, company or institution, and phase, as well as how many patients are to be enrolled. It also includes links to the www.clinicaltrials.gov website – a list of clinical trials registered with the National Institutes of Health – with details about patient eligibility and how to apply to be part of the trial.

The Dashboard is our way of making it as easy as possible for you to find the information you need, when you need it.

On Thursday, we’ll introduce you to one of the patients involved in a CIRM-funded clinical trial for cancer.

Budgeting for the future of the stem cell agency

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The CIRM Board discusses the future of the Stem Cell Agency

Budgets are very rarely exciting things; but they are important. For example, it’s useful for a family to know when they go shopping exactly how much money they have so they know how much they can afford to spend. Stem cell agencies face the same constraints; you can’t spend more than you have. Last week the CIRM Board looked at what we have in the bank, and set us on a course to be able to do as many of the things we want to, with the money we have left.

First some context. Last year CIRM spent a shade over $306 million on a wide range of research from Discovery, the earliest stage, through Translational and into Clinical trials. We estimate that is going to leave us with approximately $335 million to spend in the coming years.

A couple of years ago our Board approved a 5 year Strategic Plan that laid out some pretty ambitious goals for us to achieve – such as funding 50 new clinical trials. At the time, that many clinical trials definitely felt like a stretch and we questioned if it would be possible. We’re proving that it is. In just two years we have funded 26 new clinical trials, so we are halfway to our goal, which is terrific. But it also means we are in danger of using up all our money faster than anticipated, and not having the time to meet all our goals.

Doing the math

So, for the last couple of months our Leadership Team has been crunching the numbers and looking for ways to use the money in the most effective and efficient way. Last week they presented their plan to the Board.

It boiled down to a few options.

  • Keep funding at the current rate and run out of money by 2019
  • Limit funding just to clinical trials, which would mean we could hit our 50 clinical trial goal by 2020 but would not have enough to fund Discovery and Translational level research
  • Place caps on how much we fund each clinical trial, enabling us to fund more clinical trials while having enough left over for Discovery and Translational awards

The Board went for the third option for some good reasons. The plan is consistent with the goals laid out in our Strategic Plan and it supports Discovery and Translational research, which are important elements in our drive to develop new therapies for patients.

Finding the right size cap

Here’s a look at the size of the caps on clinical trial funding. You’ll see that in the case of late stage pre-clinical work and Phase 1 clinical trials, the caps are still larger than the average amount we funded those stages last year. For Phase 2 the cap is almost the same as the average. For Phase 3 the cap is half the amount from last year, but we think at this stage Phase 3 trials should be better able to attract funding from other sources, such as industry or private investors.

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Another important reason why the Board chose option three – and here you’ll have to forgive me for being rather selfish – is that it means the Administration Budget (which pays the salaries of the CIRM team, including yours truly) will be enough to cover the cost of running this research plan until 2020.

The bottom line is that for 2018 we’ll be able to spend $130 million on clinical stage research, $30 million for Translational stage, and $10 million for Discovery. The impact the new funding caps will have on clinical stage projects is likely to be small (you can see the whole presentation and details of our plan here) but the freedom it gives us to support the broad range of our work is huge.

And here is where to go if you are interested in seeing the different funding opportunities at CIRM.

Stem Cell Stories That Caught our Eye: Stem Cell Therapies for Stroke and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients

With the Thanksgiving holiday behind us, we’re back to the grind at CIRM. Here are two exciting CIRM-funded stem cell stories that happened while you were away.

Stanford Scientists Are Treating Stroke Patients with Stem Cells

Smithsonian Magazine featured the work of a CIRM-funded scientist in their December Magazine issue. The article, “A Neurosurgeon’s Remarkable Plan to Treat Stroke Victims with Stem Cells”, features Dr. Gary Steinberg, who is the Chair of Neurosurgery at Stanford Medical Center and the founder of the Stanford Stroke Center.

Gary Steinberg (Photo by Jonathan Sprague)

The brain and its 100 billion cells need blood, which carries oxygen and nutrients, to function. When that blood supply is cut off, brain cells start to die and patients experience a stroke. Stroke can happen in one of two ways: either by blood clots that block the arteries and blood vessels that send blood to the brain or by blood vessels that burst within the brain itself. Symptoms experienced by stroke victims vary based on the severity of the stroke, but often patients report experiencing numbness or paralysis in their limbs or face, difficulty walking, talking and understanding.

Steinberg and his team at Stanford are developing a stem cell treatment to help stroke patients. Steinberg believes that not all brain cells die during a stroke, but rather some brain cells become “dormant” and stop functioning instead. By transplanting stem cells derived from donated bone marrow into the brains of stroke patients, Steinberg thinks he can wake up these dormant cells much like how the prince wakens Sleeping Beauty from her century of enchanted sleep.

Basically, the transplanted cells act like a defibrillator for the dormant cells in the stroke-damaged area of the brain. Steinberg thinks that the transplanted cells secrete proteins that signal dormant brain cells to wake up and start functioning normally again, and that they also trigger a “helpful immune response” that prompts the brain to repair itself.

Sonia has seen first hand how a stroke can rob you of even your most basic abilities.

Steinberg tested this stem cell treatment in a small clinical trial back in 2013. 18 patients were treated and many of them showed improvements in their symptoms. The Smithsonian piece mentions a particular patient who had a remarkable response to the treatment. Sonia Olea Coontz, at age 32, suffered a stroke that robbed her of most of her speech and her ability to use her right arm and leg. After receiving Steinberg’s stem cell treatment, Sonia rapidly improved and was able to raise her arm above her head and gained most of her speech back. You can read more about her experience in our Stories of Hope.

In collaboration with a company called SanBio, Steinberg’s team is now testing this stem cell therapy in 156 stroke patients in a CIRM-funded phase 2 clinical trial. The trial will help answer the question of whether this treatment is safe and also effective in a larger group of patients.

The Smithsonian article, which I highly recommend reading, shared Steinberg’s future aspirations to pursue stem cell therapies for traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS.

 

Capricor Approved to Launch New Clinical Trial for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

On Wednesday, Capricor Therapeutics achieved an exciting milestone for its leading candidate CAP-1002 – a stem cell-based therapy developed to treat boys and young men with a muscle-wasting disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

The Los Angeles-based company announced that it received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for their investigational new drug (IND) application to launch a new clinical trial called HOPE II that’s testing repeated doses of CAP-1002 cells in DMD patients. The cells are derived from donated heart tissue and are believed to release regenerative factors that strengthen heart and other muscle function in DMD patients.

Capricor is currently conducting a Phase 2 trial, called HOPE-1, that’s testing a single dose of CAP-1002 cells in 24 DMD patients. CIRM is funding this trial and you can learn more about it on our clinical dashboard website and watch a video interview we did with a young man who participated in the trial.

Earlier this year, the company shared encouraging, positive results from the HOPE-1 trial suggesting that the therapy was improving some heart function and upper limb movement six months after treatment and was well-tolerated in patients. The goal of the new trial will be to determine whether giving patients repeated doses of the cell therapy over time will extend the benefits in upper limb movement in DMD patients.

In a news release, Capricor President and CEO Dr. Linda Marbán shared her company’s excitement for the launch of their new trial and what this treatment could mean for DMD patients,

Linda Marban, CEO of Capricor Therapeutics

“The FDA’s clearance of this IND upon its initial submission is a significant step forward in our development of CAP-1002. While there are many clinical initiatives in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, this is one of the very few to focus on non-ambulant patients. These boys and young men are looking to maintain what function they have in their arms and hands and, based on our previous study, we think CAP-1002 may be able to do exactly that.”

Using heart stem cells to help boys battling a deadly disorder

 

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Caleb Sizemore, a young man with DMD, speaks to the CIRM Board about his treatment in the Capricor clinical trial.

It’s hard to imagine how missing just one tiny protein can have such a devastating impact on a person. But with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) the lack of a single protein called dystrophin has deadly consequences. Now a new study is offering hope we may be able to help people with this rare genetic disorder.

DMD is a muscle wasting condition that steadily destroys the muscles in the arms and legs, heart and respiratory system. It affects mostly boys and it starts early in life, sometimes as young as 3 years old, and never lets up. By early teens many boys are unable to walk and are in a wheelchair. Their heart and breathing are also affected. In the past most people with DMD didn’t survive their teens. Now it’s more common for them to live into their 20’s and 30’s, but not much beyond that.

Results from a clinical trial being run by Capricor Therapeutics – and funded by CIRM – suggest we may be able to halt, and even reverse, some of the impacts of DMD.

Capricor has developed a therapy called CAP-1002 using cells derived from heart stem cells, called cardiospheres. Boys and young men with DMD who were treated with CAP-1002 experienced what Capricor calls “significant and sustained improvements in cardiac structure and function, as well as skeletal muscle function.”

In a news release Dr. Ronald Victor, a researcher at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the lead investigator for the trial, said they followed these patients for 12 months after treatment and the results are encouraging:

“Because Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a devastating, muscle-wasting disease that causes physical debilitation and eventually heart failure, the improvements in heart and skeletal muscle in those treated with a single dose of CAP-1002 are very promising and show that a subsequent trial is warranted. These early results provide hope for the Duchenne community, which is in urgent need of a major therapeutic breakthrough.”

According to the 12-month results:

  • 89 percent of patients treated with CAP-1002 showed sustained or improved muscle function compared to untreated patients
  • The CAP-1002 group had improved heart muscle function compared to the untreated group
  • The CAP-1002 group had reduced scarring on their heart compared to the untreated group.

Now, these results are still very early stage and there’s a danger in reading too much into them. However, the fact that they are sustained over one year is a promising sign. Also, none of the treated patients experienced any serious side effects from the therapy.

The team at Capricor now plans to go back to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to get clearance to launch an even larger study in 2018.

For a condition like DMD, that has no cure and where treatments can simply slow down the progression of the disorder, this is a hopeful start.

Caleb Sizemore is one of the people treated in this trial. You can read his story and listen to him describing the impact of the treatment on his life.

Turning the corner with the FDA and NIH; CIRM creates new collaborations to advance stem cell research

FDAThis blog is part of the Month of CIRM series on the Stem Cellar

A lot can change in a couple of years. Just take our relationship with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

When we were putting together our Strategic Plan in 2015 we did a survey of key players and stakeholders at CIRM – Board members, researchers, patient advocates etc. – and a whopping 70 percent of them listed the FDA as the biggest impediment for the development of stem cell treatments.

As one stakeholder told us at the time:

“Is perfect becoming the enemy of better? One recent treatment touted by the FDA as a regulatory success had such a high clinical development hurdle placed on it that by the time it was finally approved the standard of care had evolved. When it was finally approved, five years later, its market potential had significantly eroded and the product failed commercially.”

Changing the conversation

To overcome these hurdles we set a goal of changing the regulatory landscape, finding a way to make the system faster and more efficient, but without reducing the emphasis on the safety of patients. One of the ways we did this was by launching our “Stem Cell Champions” campaign to engage patients, patient advocates, the public and everyone else who supports stem cell research to press for change at the FDA. We also worked with other organizations to help get the 21st Century Cures Act passed.

21 century cures

Today the regulatory landscape looks quite different than it did just a few years ago. Thanks to the 21st Century Cures Act the FDA has created expedited pathways for stem cell therapies that show promise. One of those is called the Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) designation, which gives projects that show they are both safe and effective in early-stage clinical trials the possibility of an accelerated review by the FDA. Of the first projects given RMAT designation, three were CIRM-funded projects (Humacyte, jCyte and Asterias)

Partnering with the NIH

Our work has also paved the way for a closer relationship with the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is looking at CIRM as a model for advancing the field of regenerative medicine.

In recent years we have created a number of innovations including introducing CIRM 2.0, which dramatically improved our ability to fund the most promising research, making it faster, easier and more predictable for researchers to apply. We also created the Stem Cell Center  to make it easier to move the most promising research out of the lab and into clinical trials, and to give researchers the support they need to help make those trials successful. To address the need for high-quality stem cell clinical trials we created the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Network. This is a network of leading medical centers around the state that specialize in delivering stem cell therapies, sharing best practices and creating new ways of making it as easy as possible for patients to get the care they need.

The NIH looked at these innovations and liked them. So much so they invited CIRM to come to Washington DC and talk about them. It was a great opportunity so, of course, we said yes. We expected them to carve out a few hours for us to chat. Instead they blocked out a day and a half and brought in the heads of their different divisions to hear what we had to say.

A model for the future

We hope the meeting is, to paraphrase Humphrey Bogart at the end of Casablanca, “the start of a beautiful friendship.” We are already seeing signs that it’s not just a passing whim. In July the NIH held a workshop that focused on what will it take to make genome editing technologies, like CRISPR, a clinical reality. Francis Collins, NIH Director, invited CIRM to be part of the workshop that included thought leaders from academia, industry and patients advocates. The workshop ended with a recommendation that the NIH should consider building a center of excellence in gene editing and transplantation, based on the CIRM model (my emphasis).  This would bring together a multidisciplinary disease team including, process development, cGMP manufacturing, regulatory and clinical development for Investigational New Drug (IND) filing and conducting clinical trials, all under one roof.

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Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the NIH

In preparation, the NIH visited the CIRM-funded Stem Cell Center at the City of Hope to explore ways to develop this collaboration. And the NIH has already begun implementing these suggestions starting with a treatment targeting sickle cell disease.

There are no guarantees in science. But we know that if you spend all your time banging your head against a door all you get is a headache. Today it feels like the FDA has opened the door and that, together with the NIH, they are more open to collaborating with organizations like CIRM. We have removed the headache, and created the possibility that by working together we truly can accelerate stem cell research and deliver the therapies that so many patients desperately need.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting faster, working smarter: how changing the way we work is paying big dividends

This blog is part of the Month of CIRM series

Speeding up the way you do things isn’t always a good idea. Just ask someone who got a ticket for going 65mph in a 30mph zone. But at CIRM we have found that doing things at an accelerated pace is paying off in a big way.

When CIRM started back in 2004 we were, in many ways, a unique organization. That meant we pretty much had to build everything from scratch, creating our own ways of asking for applications, reviewing those applications, funding them etc. Fast forward ten years and it was clear that, as good a job as we did in those early days, there was room for improvement in the way we operated.

So we made some changes. Big changes.

We adopted as our mantra the phrase “operational excellence.” It doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue but it does reflect what we were aiming for. The Business Dictionary defines operational excellence as:

 “A philosophy of the workplace where problem-solving, teamwork, and leadership results in the ongoing improvement in an organization.”

We didn’t want to just tinker with the way we worked, we wanted to reinvent every aspect of our operation. To do that we involved everyone in the operation. We held a series of meetings where everyone at CIRM, and I do mean everyone, was invited to join in and offer their ideas on how to improve our operation.

CIRM2.0_Logo

The end result was CIRM 2.0. At the time we described it as “a radical overhaul” of the way we worked. That might have been an understatement. We increased the speed, frequency and volume of the programs we offered, making it easier and more predictable for researchers to apply to us for funding, and faster for them to get that funding if they were approved.

For example, before 2.0 it took almost two years to go from applying for funding for a clinical trial to actually getting that funding. Today it takes around 120 days.

But it’s not just about speed. It’s also about working smarter. In the past if a researcher’s application for funding for a clinical trial failed it could be another 12 months before they got a chance to apply again. With many diseases 12 months could be a death sentence. So we changed the rules. Now if you have a project ready for a clinical trial you can apply any time. And instead of recommending or not recommending a project, basically voting it up or down, our independent panel of expert reviewers now give researchers with good but not great applications constructive feedback, enabling the researchers to make the changes needed to improve their project, and reapply for funding within 30 days.

This has not only increased the number of applications for clinical trials, it has also increased the quality of those applications.

We made similar changes in our Discovery and Translation programs. Increasing the frequency of each award, making it easier for researchers to know when the next round of funding was coming up. And we added incentives to encourage researchers to move successful projects on to the next level. We wanted to create a pipeline of the most promising projects steadily moving towards the clinic.

The motivation to do this comes from our patients. At CIRM we are in the time business. Many of the patients who are looking to stem cells to help them don’t have the luxury of time; they are rapidly running out of it. So we have a responsibility to do all we can to reduce the amount of time it takes to get the most promising therapies to them, without in any way compromising safety and jeopardizing their health.

By the end of 2016 those changes were very clearly paying dividends as we increased the frequency of reviews and the number of projects we reviewed but at the same time decreased the amount of time it took us to do all that.

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But we are not done yet. We have done a good job of improving the way we work. But there is always room to be even better, to go even faster and be more efficient.

We are not done accelerating. Not by a long shot.

The Alpha Stem Cell Clinics: Innovation for Breakthrough Stem Cell Treatments

During this third week of the Month of CIRM, we are focusing on CIRM’s Infrastructure programs which are all focused on helping to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

So here is the question of the day: What is the world’s largest network of medical centers dedicated to providing stem cell treatments to patients?

The answer is the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network.

The CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network consists of leading medical institutions throughout California.

The ASCC Network consists of six leading medical centers throughout California. In 2015, the Network was launched in southern California at the City of Hope, UC Irvine, UC Los Angeles, and UC San Diego. In September 2017, CIRM awarded funding to UC Davis and UC San Francisco to enable the Network to better serve patients throughout the state. Forty stem cell clinical trials have been conducted within the Network with hundreds of patients being treat for a variety of conditions, including:

  • Cancers of the blood, brain, lung and other sites
  • Organ diseases of the heart and kidney
  • Pediatric diseases
  • Traumatic injury to the brain and spine

A complete list of clinical trials may be found on our website.

The Alpha Clinics at UC Los Angeles and San Francisco are working collaboratively on breakthrough treatments for serious childhood diseases. This video highlights a CIRM-funded clinical trial at the UCLA Alpha Clinic that is designed to restore the immune system of patients with life-threatening immune deficiencies. A similar breakthrough treatment is also being used at the UCLA Alpha Clinic to treat sickle cell disease. A video describing this treatment is below.

Why do we need a specialized Network for stem cell clinical trials?

Stem cell treatments are unique in many ways. First, they consist of cells or cell products that frequently require specialized processing. For example, the breakthrough treatments for children, described above, requires the bone marrow to be genetically modified to correct defects. This “gene therapy” is performed in the Alpha Clinic laboratories, which are specifically designed to implement cutting edge gene therapy techniques on the patient’s stem cells.

Many of the cancer clinical trials also take the patient’s own cells and then process them in a laboratory. This processing is designed to enhance the patient’s ability to fight cancer using their own immune cells. Each Alpha Clinic has specialized laboratories to process cells, and the sites at City of Hope and UC Davis have world-class facilities for stem cell manufacturing. The City of Hope and Davis facilities produce high quality therapeutic products for commercial and academic clinical trial sponsors. Because of this ability, the Network has become a prime location internationally for clinical trials requiring processing and manufacturing services.

Another unique feature of the Network is its partnership with CIRM, whose mission is to accelerate stem cell treatments for patients with unmet medical needs. Often, this means developing treatments for rare diseases in which the patient population is comparatively small. For example, there about 40-100 immune deficient children born each year in the United States. We are funding clinical trials to help treat those children. The Network is also treating rare brain and blood cancers.

To find patients that may benefit from these treatments, the Network has developed the capacity to confidentially query over 20 million California patient records. If a good match is found, there is a procedure in place, that is reviewed by an ethics committee, where the patient’s doctor can be notified of the trial and pass that information to the patient. For patients that are interested in learning more, each Alpha Clinic has a Patient Care Coordinator with the job of coordinating the process of educating patients about the trial and assisting them if they choose to participate.

How Can I Learn More?

If you are a patient or a family member and would like to learn more about the CIRM Alpha Clinics, click here. There is contact information for each clinic so you can learn more about specific trials, or you can visit our Alpha Clinics Trials page for a complete list of trials ongoing in the Network.

If you are a patient or a trial sponsor interested in learning more about the services offered through our Alpha Clinics Network, visit our website.