Taking the message to the people: fighting for the future of stem cell research in California

Stem cells have been in the news a lot this week, and not necessarily for the right reason.

First, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) won a big legal decision in its fight to crack down on clinics offering bogus, unproven and unapproved stem cell therapies.

But then came news that another big name celebrity, in this case Star Trek star William Shatner, was going to one of these clinics for an infusion of what he called “restorative cells”.

It’s a reminder that for every step forward we take in trying to educate the public about the dangers of clinics offering unproven therapies, we often take another step back when a celebrity essentially endorses the idea.

So that’s why we are taking our message directly to the people, as often as we can and wherever we can.

In June we are going to be holding a free, public event in Los Angeles to coincide with the opening of the International Society for Stem Cell Research’s Annual Conference, the biggest event on the global stem cell calendar. There’s still time to register for that by the way. The event is from 6-7pm on Tuesday, June 25th in Petree Hall C., at the Los Angeles Convention Center at 1201 South Figueroa Street, LA 90015.

The event is open to everyone and it’s FREE. We have created an Eventbrite page where you can get all the details and RSVP if you are coming.

It’s going to be an opportunity to learn about the real progress being made in stem cell research, thanks in no small part to CIRM’s funding. We’re honored to be joined by UCLA’s Dr. Don Kohn, who has helped cure dozens of children born with a fatal immune system disorder called severe combined immunodeficiency, also known as “bubble baby disease”. And we’ll hear from the family of one of those children whose life he helped save.

And because CIRM is due to run out of money to fund new projects by the end of this year you’ll also learn about the very real concerns we have about the future of stem cell research in California and what can be done to address those concerns. It promises to be a fascinating evening.

But that’s not all. Our partners at USC will be holding another public event on stem cell research, on Wednesday June 26th from 6.30p to 8pm. This one is focused on treatments for age-related blindness. This features some of the top stem cell scientists in the field who are making encouraging progress in not just slowing down vision loss, but in some cases even reversing it.

You can find out more about that event here.

We know that we face some serious challenges in trying to educate people about the risks of going to a clinic offering unproven therapies. But we also know we have a great story to tell, one that shows how we are already changing lives and saving lives, and that with the support of the people of California we’ll do even more in the years to come.

Rare Disease Gets Big Boost from California’s Stem Cell Agency

UC Irvine’s Dr. Leslie Thompson and patient advocate Frances Saldana after the CIRM Board vote to approve funding for Huntington’s disease

If you were looking for a poster child for an unmet medical need Huntington’s disease (HD) would be high on the list. It’s a devastating disease that attacks the brain, steadily destroying the ability to control body movement and speech. It impairs thinking and often leads to dementia. It’s always fatal and there are no treatments that can stop or reverse the course of the disease. Today the Board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) voted to support a project that shows promise in changing that.

The Board voted to approve $6 million to enable Dr. Leslie Thompson and her team at the University of California, Irvine to do the late stage testing needed to apply to the US Food and Drug Administration for permission to start a clinical trial in people. The therapy involves transplanting stem cells that have been turned into neural stem cells which secrete a molecule called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has been shown to promote the growth and improve the function of brain cells. The goal is to slow down the progression of this debilitating disease.

“Huntington’s disease affects around 30,000 people in the US and children born to parents with HD have a 50/50 chance of getting the disease themselves,” says Dr. Maria T. Millan, the President and CEO of CIRM. “We have supported Dr. Thompson’s work for a number of years, reflecting our commitment to helping the best science advance, and are hopeful today’s vote will take it a crucial step closer to a clinical trial.”

Another project supported by CIRM at an earlier stage of research was also given funding for a clinical trial.

The Board approved almost $12 million to support a clinical trial to help people undergoing a kidney transplant. Right now, there are around 100,000 people in the US waiting to get a kidney transplant. Even those fortunate enough to get one face a lifetime on immunosuppressive drugs to stop the body rejecting the new organ, drugs that increase the risk for infection, heart disease and diabetes.  

Dr. Everett Meyer, and his team at Stanford University, will use a combination of healthy donor stem cells and the patient’s own regulatory T cells (Tregs), to train the patient’s immune system to accept the transplanted kidney and eliminate the need for immunosuppressive drugs.

The initial group targeted in this clinical trial are people with what are called HLA-mismatched kidneys. This is where the donor and recipient do not share the same human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), proteins located on the surface of immune cells and other cells in the body. Around 50 percent of patients with HLA-mismatched transplants experience rejection of the organ.

In his application Dr. Meyer said they have a simple goal: “The goal is “one kidney for life” off drugs with safety for all patients. The overall health status of patients off immunosuppressive drugs will improve due to reduction in side effects associated with these drugs, and due to reduced graft loss afforded by tolerance induction that will prevent chronic rejection.”

Midwest universities are making important tools to advance stem cell research

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iPSCs are not just pretty, they’re also pretty remarkable

Two Midwest universities are making headlines for their contributions to stem cell research. Both are developing important tools to advance this field of study, but in two unique ways.

Scientists at the University of Michigan (UM), have compiled an impressive repository of disease-specific stem cell lines. Cell lines are crucial tools for scientists to study the mechanics of different diseases and allows them to do so without animal models. While animal models have important benefits, such as the ability to study a disease within the context of a living mammal, insights gained from such models can be difficult to translate to humans and many diseases do not even have good models to use.

The stem cell lines generated at the Reproductive Sciences Program at UM, are thanks to numerous individuals who donated extra embryos they did not use for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Researchers at UM then screened these embryos for abnormalities associated with different types of disease and generated some 36 different stem cell lines. These have been donated to the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry, and include cell lines for diseases such as cystic fibrosis, Huntington’s Disease and hemophilia.

Using one such cell line, Dr. Peter Todd at UM, found that the genetic abnormality associated with Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic mutation that results in developmental delays and learning disabilities, can be corrected by using a novel biological tool. Because Fragile X Syndrome does not have a good animal model, this stem cell line was critical for improving our understanding of this disease.

In the next state over, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWM), researchers are doing similar work but using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for their work.

The Human Stem Cell Gene Editing Service has proved to be an important resource in expediting research projects across campus. They use CRISPR-Cas9 technology (an efficient method to mutate or edit the DNA of any organism), to generate human stem cell lines that contain disease specific mutations. Researchers use these cell lines to determine how the mutation affects cells and/or how to correct the cellular abnormality the mutation causes. Unlike the work at UM, these stem cell lines are derived from iPSCs  which can be generated from easy to obtain human samples, such as skin cells.

The gene editing services at UWM have already proved to be so popular in their short existence that they are considering expanding to be able to accommodate off-campus requests. This highlights the extent to which both CRISPR technology and stem cell research are being used to answer important scientific questions to advance our understanding of disease.

CIRM also created an iPSC bank that researchers can use to study different diseases. The  Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Repository is  the largest repository of its kind in the world and is used by researchers across the globe.

The iPSC Repository was created by CIRM to house a collection of stem cells from thousands of individuals, some healthy, but some with diseases such as heart, lung or liver disease, or disorders such as autism. The goal is for scientists to use these cells to better understand diseases and develop and test new therapies to combat them. This provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the cell types from patients that are affected in disease, but for which cells cannot otherwise be easily obtained in large quantities.

New hope for stem cell therapy in patients with leukemia

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Leukemia white blood cell

Of the many different kinds of cancer that affect humans, leukemia is the most common in young people. As with many types cancer, doctors mostly turn to chemotherapy to treat patients. Chemotherapy, however, comes with its own share of issues, primarily severe side effects and the constant threat of disease recurrence.

Stem cell therapy treatment has emerged as a potential cure for some types of cancer, with leukemia patients being among the first groups of patients to receive this type of treatment. While exciting because of the possibility of a complete cure, stem cell therapy comes with its own challenges. Let’s take a closer look.

Leukemia is characterized by abnormal white blood cells (also known as the many different types of cells that make up our immune system) that are produced at high levels. Stem cell therapy is such an appealing treatment option because it involves replacing the patient’s aberrant blood stem cells with healthy ones from a donor, which provides the possibility of complete and permanent remission for the patient.

Unfortunately, in approximately half of patients who receive this therapy, the donor cells (which turn into immune cells), can also destroy the patients healthy tissue (i.e. liver, skin etc…), because the transplanted blood stem cells recognize patient’s tissue as foreign. While doctors try to lessen this type of response (also known as graft versus host disease (GVHD)), by suppressing the patient’s immune system, this procedure lessens the effectiveness of the stem cell therapy itself.

Now scientists at the University of Zurich have made an important discovery – published in the journal Science Translational Medicine – that could mitigate this potentially fatal response in patients. They found that a molecule called GM-CSF, is a critical mediator of the severity of GVHD. Using a mouse model, they showed that if the donor cells were unable to produce GM-CSF, then mice fared significantly better both in terms of less damage to tissues normally affected by GVHD, such as the skin, and overall survival.

While exciting, the scientists were concerned about narrowing in on this molecule as a potential target to lessen GVHD, because GM-CSF, an important molecule in the immune system, might also be important for ensuring that the donor immune cells do their jobs properly. Reassuringly, the researchers found that blocking GM-CSF’s function had no effect on the ability of the donor cells to exert their anti-cancer effect. This was surprising because previously the ability of donor cells to cause GVHD, versus protect patients from the development of cancer was thought to occur via the same biological mechanisms.

Most excitingly, however, was that finding that high levels of GM-CSF are also observed in patient samples, and that the levels of GM-CSF correlate to the severity of GVHD. Dr. Burkhard Becher and his colleagues, the authors of this study, now want to run a clinical trial to determine whether blocking GM-CSF blocks GVHD in humans like it does in mice. In a press release, Dr. Becher states the importance of these findings:

“If we can stop the graft-versus-host response while preserving the anti-cancer effect, this procedure can be employed much more successfully and with fewer risks to the patient. This therapeutic strategy holds particular promise for patients with the poorest prognosis and highest risk of fatality.”

How stem cells may help children battling birth injuries

From time to time we invite patients or patient advocates to post a guest blog on the Stem Cellar. Today we are featuring Brigitta Burguess, a mother and writer from Michigan, who focuses on pregnancy, parenting, and children with disabilities. Brigitta writes for the HIE Help Center, a website that offers information and supportive resources for families of children with disabilities.

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Because stem cells are the building blocks of the immune system, they possess the ability to develop into other types of cells. You can use stem cells to help repair tissues, organs, and blood vessels, and even treat a host of different diseases. This is done through stem cell harvesting and stem cell therapy. In stem cell therapy, stem cells are injected into injured tissues in the hopes of replacing damaged tissue and preserving existing tissues.

Cord Blood

Every part of the human body contains stem cells. However, many areas of the body do not contain enough stem cells to make harvesting them worthwhile. Cord blood, the leftover blood collected from a baby’s umbilical cord or a mother’s placenta after birth, is especially beneficial because:

  • It provides a rich source of stem cells that can be changed into other types of cells and help to maintain and repair tissues
  • Its stem cells are immature and have not developed the ability to attack foreign cells, which makes them perfect for transplant
  • Its stem cells differ from embryonic stem cells in that they are considered adult stem cells and do not require the destruction of an embryo to harvest
  • It can be used to treat blood disorders, immune deficiencies, and certain cancers
  • Storing cord blood can help family and community members receive gene therapy treatment for the aforementioned conditions and diseases

The Applications of Stem Cell Therapy for Kids

Today, over 2,000 total cord blood stem cell transplants are performed annually, with the total number of cord blood banks worldwide reaching over 150. The innovations in stem cell therapy have made waves over the past four decades. Today, more than 80 difference diseases are being treated with cord blood stem cells.

In 2012, many clinical trials revealed that cord blood transplants were an effective treatment for cerebral palsy. Researchers also believe that cord blood stem cells have great potential in treating the neonatal brain injuries such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). As of right now, there is no indication that stem cell therapy can cure these conditions, but there is some evidence that it can lessen the severity of symptoms.

It is important to note that there is thus far no cure for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and resulting motor, cognitive, and/or intellectual disorders. Stem cell therapy seeks to limit the damage caused by HIE and reduce the severity of disabilities caused by HIE, but it is not a cure.

Because stem cell therapy is still in clinical trials, parents should think twice before going down this untested path, as no formal guidelines about administration protocol, dosages, safety, or treatment timeline have yet been established. Clinical trials are important for ensuring that treatments are safe and effective – unregulated treatments bear significant risk.

To learn more about stem cell therapy trials for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, please visit the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Clinical Trial Recruitment Center.

 

Has Regenerative Medicine Come of Age?

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For the past few years the Signals blog site –  which offers an insiders’ perspectives on the world of regenerative medicine and stem cell research – has hosted what it calls a “Blog Carnival”. This is an event where bloggers from across the stem cell field are invited to submit a piece based on a common theme. This year’s theme is “Has Regenerative Medicine Come of Age?” Here’s my take on that question:

Many cultures have different traditions to mark when a child comes of age. A bar mitzvah is a Jewish custom marking a boy reaching his 13th birthday when he is considered accountable for his own actions. Among Latinos in the US a quinceañera is the name given to the coming-of-age celebration on a girl’s 15th birthday.

Regenerative Medicine (RM) doesn’t have anything quite so simple or obvious, and yet the signs are strong that if RM hasn’t quite come of age, it’s not far off.

For example, look at our experience at the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). When we were created by the voters of California in 2004 the world of stem cell research was still at a relatively immature phase. In fact, CIRM was created just six years after scientists first discovered a way to derive stem cells from human embryos and develop those cells in the laboratory. No surprise then that in the first few years of our existence we devoted a lot of funding to building world class research facilities and investing in basic research, to gain a deeper understanding of stem cells, what they could do and how we could use them to develop therapies.

Fast forward 14 years and we now have funded 49 projects in clinical trials – everything from stroke and cancer to spinal cord injury and HIV/AIDS – and our early funding also helped another 11 projects get into clinical trials. Clearly the field has advanced dramatically.

In addition the FDA last year approved the first two CAR-T therapies – Kymriah and Yescarta – another indication that progress is being made at many levels.

But there is still a lot of work to do. Many of the trials we are funding at the Stem Cell Agency are either Phase 1 or 2 trials. We have only a few Phase 3 trials on our books, a pattern reflected in the wider RM field. For some projects the results are very encouraging – Dr. Gary Steinberg’s work at Stanford treating people recovering from a stroke is tremendously promising. For others, the results are disappointing. We have cancelled some projects because it was clear they were not going to meet their goals. That is to be expected. These clinical trials are experiments that are testing, often for the first time ever in people, a whole new way of treating disease. Failure comes with the territory.

As the number of projects moving out of the lab and into clinical trials increases so too are the other signs of progress in RM. We recently held a workshop bringing together researchers and regulators from all over the world to explore the biggest problems in manufacturing, including how you go from making a small batch of stem cells for a few patients in an early phase clinical trial to mass producing them for thousands, if not millions of patients. We are also working with the National Institutes of Health and other stakeholders in discussing the idea of reimbursement, figuring out who pays for these therapies so they are available to the patients who need them.

And as the field advances so too do the issues we have to deal with. The discovery of the gene-editing tool CRISPR has opened up all sorts of possible new ways of developing treatments for deadly diseases. But it has also opened up a Pandora’s box of ethical issues that the field as a whole is working hard to respond to.

These are clear signs of a maturing field. Five years ago, we dreamed of having these kinds of conversations. Now they are a regular feature of any RM conference.

The simple fact that we can pose a question asking if RM has come of age is a sign all by itself that we are on the way.

Like little kids sitting in the back of a car, anxious to get to their destination, we are asking “Are we there yet?” And as every parent in the front seat of their car responds, “Not yet. But soon.”

Regenerative Medicine by the numbers: a snapshot of how the field is progressing

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Statistics don’t usually make for very exciting blog fodder, but they can be useful in charting progress. Case in point, the recent quarterly report from the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM), a global advocate and industry group for the field.

In the report ARM takes an in-depth look at cell therapy, gene therapy, tissue engineering and other trends in the regenerative medicine field.

Among the more notable findings are:

  • Companies in the regenerative medicine space collectively raised more than $4.1 billion in the second quarter of this year, up 164 percent over the same period in 2017.
  • Companies focused on cell therapy raised $2.2 billion, up 416 percent over the same period last year.
  • More and more companies in the space are turning to the public markets. So far this year they collectively raised $913.4 million in IPOs (initial public offerings – the very first sale of a company’s stock to the public), up from $254 million during all of last year.
  • Nearly 977 clinical trials testing such therapies are in progress across the globe; more than half of them are trying to treat cancer.

In a news release, Janet Lynch Lambert, ARM’s CEO, was understandably upbeat:

“There has been a tremendous amount of forward momentum during the first half of this year, both clinically and commercially. We’re excited for the continued growth of the regenerative medicine sector, and what it means for patients worldwide.”

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Promising Advances in Alzheimer’s Research Could Create More Advanced Therapy Options

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Photo Courtesy of NIH

New developments in Alzheimer’s research are bringing us closer to more precise therapies for this debilitating disease.

Alzheimer’s disease, is characterized by the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain, which interfere with the normal communication flow between brain cells, leading to debilitating symptoms like memory loss and impaired decision-making. These plaques are made out of beta-amyloid proteins that stick together.

Over the past few years, researchers from several institutions have been working to develop antibodies that bind to and neutralize the toxic effects of the beta-amyloid. The search for effective antibodies, although promising, has been riddled with setbacks. Knowing this, a team of researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA, decided to approach this issue from a different angle – by conducting experiments to identify a better way of targeting beta-amyloid. Their goal was to develop a more efficient antibody to be used in Alzheimer’s therapy.

Principal investigator Dominic Walsh and team came up with a novel technique to collect beta-amyloid and to prepare it in the laboratory.

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Dominic Walsh, PH.D.

“Many different efforts are currently underway to find treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, and anti-[beta-amyloid] antibodies are currently the furthest advanced,” says Walsh. “But the question remains: what are the most important forms of [beta-amyloid] to target? Our study points to some interesting answers,” the lead researcher adds, and these answers are now reported in an open access paper published in the journal Nature Communications.”

Beta-amyloid can be found in many forms. At one end of the spectrum, it exists as a single protein, or monomer, which isn’t necessarily toxic.

At the other end, there is the beta-amyloid plaque, in which many beta-amyloid proteins become tangled together. Beta-amyloid plaques are large enough to be observed using a traditional microscope, and they are involved in the development of Alzheimer’s.

In the current study, as well as in a previous one, Walsh and team looked at beta-amyloid structures to identify the ones that are most harmful in the brain.

Typically specialists use synthetic beta-amyloid samples to create a laboratory model of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain. Very few scientists actually collect beta-amyloid from the brains of individuals diagnosed with the disease.

In the current study, Walsh and team focused on finding better a more specific antibody to target the toxic forms of beta-amyloid but not the less harmful forms. To do so, they developed a novel screening test that requires extracting beta-amyloid from brain samples from people with Alzheimer’s. They added these extracts to induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human neurons and observed the ability of the different antibodies to block the toxic effects of the beta-amyloid.

This screening test allowed the team to discover a particular antibody — called “1C22” — that is able to block toxic forms of beta-amyloid more effectively than other antibodies currently being tested in clinical trials.

Walsh explained the implications of their novel screening method:

“We anticipate that this primary screening technique will be useful in the search to identify more potent anti-[beta-amyloid] therapeutics in the future.”

New Insights into Adult Neurogenesis

To be a successful scientist, you have to expect the unexpected. No biological process or disease mechanism is ever that simple when you peel off its outer layers. Overtime, results that prove a long-believed theory can be overturned by new results that suggest an alternate theory.

UCSF scientist Arturo Alvarez-Buylla is well versed with the concept of unexpected results. His lab’s research is focused on understanding adult neurogenesis – the process of creating new nerve cells (called neurons) from neural stem cells (NSCs).

For a long time, the field of adult neurogenesis has settled on the theory that brain stem cells divide asymmetrically to create two different types of cells: neurons and neural stem cells. In this way, brain stem cells populate the brain with new neurons and they also self-renew to maintain a constant stem cell supply throughout the adult animal’s life.

New Insights into Adult Neurogenesis

Last week, Alvarez-Buylla and his colleagues published new insights on adult neurogenesis in mice in the journal Cell Stem Cell. The study overturns the original theory of asymmetrical neural stem cell division and suggests that neural stem cells divide in a symmetrical fashion that could eventually deplete their stem cell population over the lifetime of the animal.

Arturo Alvarez-Buylla explained the study’s findings in an email interview with the Stem Cellar:

Arturo Alvarez-Bulla

“Our results are not what we expected. Our work shows that postnatal NSCs are not being constantly renewed by splitting them asymmetrically, with one cell remaining as a stem cell and the other as a differentiated cell. Instead, self-renewal and differentiation are decoupled and achieved by symmetric divisions.”

In brief, the study found that neural stem cells (called B1 cells) divide symmetrically in an area of the adult mouse brain called the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). Between 70%-80% of those symmetric divisions produced neurons while only 20%-30% created new B1 stem cells. Alvarez-Buylla said that this process would result in the gradual depletion of B1 stem cells over time and seems to be carefully choreographed for the length of the lifespan of a mouse.

What does this mean?

I asked Alvarez-Buylla how his findings in mice will impact the field and whether he expects human adult neurogenesis to follow a similar process. He explained,

“The implications are quite wide, as it changes the way we think about neural stem cell retention and aging. The cells do not seem open ended with unlimited potential to be renewed, which results in a progressive decrease in NSC number and neurogenesis with time.  Understanding the mechanisms regulating proliferation of NSCs and their self-renewal also provides new insights into how the whole process of neurogenesis is choreographed over long periods by suggesting that differentiation (generation of neurons) is regulated separately from renewal.”

He further explained that mice generate new neurons in the V-SVZ brain region throughout their lifetime while humans only appear to generate new neurons during infancy in the equivalent region of the human brain called the SVZ. In humans, he said, it remains unclear where and how many neural stem cells are retained after birth.

I also asked him how these findings will impact the development of neural stem cell-based therapies for neurological or neurodegenerative diseases. Alvarez-Buylla shared interesting insights:

“Our data also indicate that upon a self-renewing division, sibling NSCs may not be equal to each other. While one NSC might stay quiescent [non-dividing] for an extended period of time, its sister cell might become activated earlier on and either undergo another round of self-renewal or differentiate. Thus, for cell-replacement therapies it will be important to understand which kind of neuron the NSC of interest can produce, and when. The use of NSCs for brain repair requires a detailed understanding of which NSC subset will be utilized for treatment and how to induce them to produce progeny. The study also suggests that factors that control NSC renewal may be separate from those that control generation of neurons.”

Scientists developing adult NSC-based therapies will definitely need to take note of Alvarez-Buylla’s findings as some NSC populations might be more successful therapeutically than others.

Neural Stem Cells in the Wild

I’ll conclude with a beautiful image that the study’s first author, Kirsten Obernier, shared with me. It’s shows the V-SVZ of the mouse brain and a neural stem cell in red making contact with a blood vessel in green and neurons in blue.

Image of the mouse brain with a neural stem cell in red. (Credit: Kirsten Obernier, UCSF)

Kirsten described the complex morphology of B1 NSCs in the mouse brain and their dynamic behavior, which Kirsten observed by taking a time lapsed video of NSCs dividing in the mouse V-SVZ. Obernier and Alvarez-Buylla hypothesize that these NSCs could be receiving signals from their surrounding environment that tell them whether to make neurons or to self-renew.

Clearly, further research is necessary to peel back the complex layers of adult neurogenesis. If NSC differentiation is regulated separately from self-renewal, their insights could shed new light on how conditions of unregulated self-renewal like brain tumors develop.

Listen up! Stem cell scientists craft new ears using children’s own cells

Imagine growing up without an ear, or with one that was stunted and deformed. It would likely have an impact on almost every part of your life, not just your hearing. But now scientists in China say they have found a way to help give children born with this condition a new ear, one that is grown using their own cells.

Microtia is a rare condition where children are born with a deformed or underdeveloped outer ear. This is what it can look like.

Microtia ear

In an interview in New Scientist, Dr. Tessa Hadlock, at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston, said:

“Children with the condition often feel self-conscious and are picked on, and are unable to wear glasses.”

In the past repairing it required several cosmetic surgeries that had to be repeated as the child grew. But now Chinese scientists say they have helped five children born with microtia grown their own ears.

In the study, published in the journal EBioMedicine, the researchers explained how they used a CT scan of the child’s normal ear to create a 3D mold, using biodegradable material. They took cartilage cells from the child’s ear, grew them in the lab, and then used them to fill in tiny holes in the ear mold. Over the course of 12 weeks the cells continued to multiply and grow and slowly replaced the biodegradable material in the mold.

While the new “ear” was being prepared in the lab, the scientists used a mechanical device to slowly expand the skin on the child’s affected ear. After 12 weeks there was enough expanded skin for the scientists to take the engineered ear, surgically implant it on the child’s head, and cover it with skin.

Over the course of the next two and a half years the engineered ear took on a more and more “natural” appearance. The children did undergo minor surgeries, to remove scar tissue, but other than that the engineered ear shows no signs of complications or of being rejected.

Here is a photo montage showing the pre and post-surgical pictures of a six-year old girl, the first person treated in the study.

Microtia

Other scientists, in the US and UK, are already working on using stem cells taken from the patient’s fat tissue, that are then re-engineered to become ear cells.

Surgeons, like Dr. Hadlock, say this study proves the concept is sound and can make a dramatic difference in the lives of children.

“It’s a very exciting approach. They’ve shown that it is possible to get close to restoring the ear structure.”