Stem cells reveal developmental defects in Huntington’s disease

Three letters, C-A-G, can make the difference between being healthy and having a genetic brain disorder called Huntington’s disease (HD). HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects movement, cognition and personality. Currently more than 30,000 Americans have HD and there is no cure or treatment to stop the disease from progressing.

A genetic mutation in the huntingtin gene. caused by an expanded repeat of CAG nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA that make our genes, is responsible for causing HD. Normal people have less than 26 CAG repeats while those with 40 or more repeats will get HD. The reasons are still unknown why this trinucleotide expansion causes the disease, but scientists hypothesize that the extra CAG copies in the huntingtin gene produce a mutant version of the Huntingtin protein, one that doesn’t function the way the normal protein should.

The HD mutation causes neurodegeneration.

As with many diseases, things start to go wrong in the body long before symptoms of the disease reveal themselves. This is the case for HD, where symptoms typically manifest in patients between the ages of 30 and 50 but problems at the molecular and cellular level occur decades before. Because of this, scientists are generating new models of HD to unravel the mechanisms that cause this disease early on in development.

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from HD patients with expanded CAG repeats are an example of a cell-based model that scientists are using to understand how HD affects brain development. In a CIRM-funded study published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience, scientists from the HD iPSC Consortium used HD iPSCs to study how the HD mutation causes problems with neurodevelopment.

They analyzed neural cells made from HD patient iPSCs and looked at what genes displayed abnormal activity compared to healthy neural cells. Using a technique called RNA-seq analysis, they found that many of these “altered” genes in HD cells played important roles in the development and maturation of neurons, the nerve cells in the brain. They also observed differences in the structure of HD neurons compared to healthy neurons when grown in a lab. These findings suggest that HD patients likely have problems with neurodevelopment and adult neurogenesis, the process where the adult stem cells in your brain generate new neurons and other brain cells.

After pinpointing the gene networks that were altered in HD neurons, they identified a small molecule drug called isoxazole-9 (Isx-9) that specifically targets these networks and rescues some of the HD-related symptoms they observed in these neurons. They also tested Isx-9 in a mouse model of HD and found that the drug improved their cognition and other symptoms related to impaired neurogenesis.

The authors conclude from their findings that the HD mutation disrupts gene networks that affect neurodevelopment and neurogenesis. These networks can be targeted by Isx-9, which rescues HD symptoms and improves the mental capacity of HD mice, suggesting that future treatments for HD should focus on targeting these early stage events.

I reached out to the leading authors of this study to gain more insights into their work. Below is a short interview with Dr. Leslie Thompson from UC Irvine, Dr. Clive Svendsen from Cedars-Sinai, and Dr. Steven Finkbeiner from the Gladstone Institutes. The responses were mutually contributed.

Leslie Thompson

Steven Finkbeiner

Clive Svendsen

 

 

 

 

 

 Q: What is the mission of the HD iPSC Consortium?

To create a resource for the HD community of HD derived stem cell lines as well as tackling problems that would be difficult to do by any lab on its own.  Through the diverse expertise represented by the consortium members, we have been able to carry out deep and broad analyses of HD-associated phenotypes [observable characteristics derived from your genome].  The authorship of the paper  – the HD iPSC consortium (and of the previous consortium paper in 2012) – reflects this goal of enabling a consortium and giving recognition to the individuals who are part of it.

Q: What is the significance of the findings in your study and what novel insights does it bring to the HD field?

 Our data revealed a surprising neurodevelopmental effect of highly expanded repeats on the HD neural cells.  A third of the changes reflected changes in networks that regulate development and maturation of neurons and when compared to neurodevelopment pathways in mice, showed that maturation appeared to be impacted.  We think that the significance is that there may be very early changes in HD brain that may contribute to later vulnerability of the brain due to the HD mutation.  This is compounded by the inability to mount normal adult neurogenesis or formation of new neurons which could compensate for the effects of mutant HTT.  The genetic mutation is present from birth and with differentiated iPSCs, we are picking up signals earlier than we expected that may reflect alterations that create increased susceptibility or limited homeostatic reserves, so with the passage of time, symptoms do result.

What we find encouraging is that using a small molecule that targets the pathways that came out of the analysis, we protected against the impact of the HD mutation, even after differentiation of the cells or in an adult mouse that had had the mutation present throughout its development.

Q: There’s a lot of evidence suggesting defects in neurodevelopment and neurogenesis cause HD. How does your study add to this idea?

Agree completely that there are a number of cell, mouse and human studies that suggest that there are problems with neurodevelopment and neurogenesis in HD.  Our study adds to this by defining some of the specific networks that may be regulating these effects so that drugs can be developed around them.  Isx9, which was used to target these pathways specifically, shows that even with these early changes, one can potentially alleviate the effects. In many of the assays, the cells were already through the early neurodevelopmental stages and therefore would have the deficits present.  But they could still be rescued.

Q: Has Isx-9 been used previously in cell or animal models of HD or other neurodegenerative diseases? Could it help HD patients who already are symptomatic?

The compound has not been used that we know of in animal models to treat neurodegeneration, although was shown to affect neurogenesis and memory in mice. Isx9 was used in a study by Stuart Lipton in Parkinson’s iPSC-derived neurons in one study and it had a protective effect on apoptosis [cell death] in a study by Ryan SD et al., 2013, Cell.

We think this type of compound could help patients who are symptomatic.  Isx-9 itself is a fairly pleiotropic drug [having multiple effects] and more research would be needed [to test its safety and efficacy].

Q: Have you treated HD mice with Isx-9 during early development to see whether the molecule improves HD symptoms?

Not yet, but we would like to.

Q: What are your next steps following this study and do you have plans to translate this research into humans?

We are following up on the research in more mature HD neurons and to determine at what stages one can rescue the HD phenotypes in mice.  Also, we would need to do pharmacodynamics and other types of assays in preclinical models to assess efficacy and then could envision going into human trials with a better characterized drug.  Our goal is to ultimately translate this to human treatments in general and specifically by targeting these altered pathways.

Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: stem cell insights into anorexia, Zika infection and bubble baby disease

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem cell model identifies new culprit for anorexia.

Eating disorders like anorexia nervosa are often thought to be caused by psychological disturbances or societal pressure. However, research into the genes of anorexia patients suggests that what’s written in your DNA can be associated with an increased vulnerability to having this disorder. But identifying individual genes at fault for a disease this complex has remained mostly out of scientists’ reach, until now.

A CIRM-funded team from the UC San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine reported this week that they’ve developed a stem cell-based model of anorexia and used it to identify a gene called TACR1, which they believe is associated with an increased likelihood of getting anorexia.

They took skin samples from female patients with anorexia and reprogrammed them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These stem cells contained the genetic information potentially responsible for causing their anorexia. The team matured these iPSCs into brain cells, called neurons, in a dish, and then studied what genes got activated. When they looked at the genes activated by anorexia neurons, they found that TACR1, a gene associated with psychiatric disorders, was switched on higher in anorexia neurons than in healthy neurons. These findings suggest that the TACR1 gene could be an identifier for this disease and a potential target for developing new treatments.

In a UCSD press release, Professor and author on the study, Alysson Muotri, said that they will follow up on their findings by studying stem cell lines derived from a larger group of patients.

Alysson Muotri UC San Diego

“But more to the point, this work helps make that possible. It’s a novel technological advance in the field of eating disorders, which impacts millions of people. These findings transform our ability to study how genetic variations alter brain molecular pathways and cellular networks to change risk of anorexia nervosa — and perhaps our ability to create new therapies.”

Anorexia is a disease that affects 1% of the global population and although therapy can be an effective treatment for some, many do not make a full recovery. Stem cell-based models could prove to be a new method for unlocking new clues into what causes anorexia and what can cure it.

Nature versus Zika, who will win?

Zika virus is no longer dominating the news headlines these days compared to 2015 when large outbreaks of the virus in the Southern hemisphere came to a head. However, the threat of Zika-induced birth defects, like microcephaly to pregnant women and their unborn children is no less real or serious two years later. There are still no effective vaccines or antiviral drugs that prevent Zika infection but scientists are working fast to meet this unmet need.

Speaking of which, scientists at UCLA think they might have a new weapon in the war against Zika. Back in 2013, they reported that a natural compound in the body called 25HC was effective at attacking viruses and prevented human cells from being infected by viruses like HIV, Ebola and Hepatitis C.

When the Zika outbreak hit, they thought that this compound could potentially be effective at preventing Zika infection as well. In their new study published in the journal Immunity, they tested a synthetic version of 25HC in animal and primate models, they found that it protected against infection. They also tested the compound on human brain organoids, or mini brains in a dish made from pluripotent stem cells. Brain organoids are typically susceptible to Zika infection, which causes substantial cell damage, but this was prevented by treatment with 25HC.

Left to right: (1) Zika virus (green) infects and destroys the formation of neurons (pink) in human stem cell-derived brain organoids.  (2) 25HC blocks Zika infection and preserves neuron formation in the organoids. (3) Reduced brain size and structure in a Zika-infected mouse brain. (4) 25HC preserves mouse brain size and structure. Image courtesy of UCLA Stem Cell.

A UCLA news release summarized the impact that this research could have on the prevention of Zika infection,

“The new research highlights the potential use of 25HC to combat Zika virus infection and prevent its devastating outcomes, such as microcephaly. The research team will further study whether 25HC can be modified to be even more effective against Zika and other mosquito-borne viruses.”

Harnessing a naturally made weapon already found in the human body to fight Zika could be an alternative strategy to preventing Zika infection.

Gene therapy in stem cells gives hope to bubble-babies.

Last week, an inspiring and touching story was reported by Erin Allday in the San Francisco Chronicle. She featured Ja’Ceon Golden, a young baby not even 6 months old, who was born into a life of isolation because he lacked a properly functioning immune system. Ja’Ceon had a rare disease called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), also known as bubble-baby disease.

 

Ja’Ceon Golden is treated by patient care assistant Grace Deng (center) and pediatric oncology nurse Kat Wienskowski. Photo: Santiago Mejia, The Chronicle.

Babies with SCID lack the body’s immune defenses against infectious diseases and are forced to live in a sterile environment. Without early treatment, SCID babies often die within one year due to recurring infections. Bone marrow transplantation is the most common treatment for SCID, but it’s only effective if the patient has a donor that is a perfect genetic match, which is only possible for about one out of five babies with this disease.

Advances in gene therapy are giving SCID babies like Ja’Ceon hope for safer, more effective cures. The SF Chronicle piece highlights two CIRM-funded clinical trials for SCID run by UCLA in collaboration with UCSF and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. In these trials, scientists isolate the bone marrow stem cells from SCID babies, correct the genetic mutation causing SCID in their stem cells, and then transplant them back into the patient to give them a healthy new immune system.

The initial results from these clinical trials are promising and support other findings that gene therapy could be an effective treatment for certain genetic diseases. CIRM’s Senior Science Officer, Sohel Talib, was quoted in the Chronicle piece saying,

“Gene therapy has been shown to work, the efficacy has been shown. And it’s safe. The confidence has come. Now we have to follow it up.”

Ja’Ceon was the first baby treated at the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital and so far, he is responding well to the treatment. His great aunt Dannie Hawkins said that it was initially hard for her to enroll Ja’Ceon in this trial because she was a partial genetic match and had the option of donating her own bone-marrow to help save his life. In the end, she decided that his involvement in the trial would “open the door for other kids” to receive this treatment if it worked.

Ja’Ceon Golden plays with patient care assistant Grace Deng in a sterile play area at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital.Photo: Santiago Mejia, The Chronicle

It’s brave patients and family members like Ja’Ceon and Dannie that make it possible for research to advance from clinical trials into effective treatments for future patients. We at CIRM are eternally grateful for their strength and the sacrifices they make to participate in these trials.

Mixed Matches: How Your Heritage Can Save a Life

Today we bring you a guest blog from Athena Mari Asklipiadis. She’s the founder of Mixed Marrow, which is an organization dedicated to finding bone marrow and blood cell donors to patients of multiethnic descent. Athena helped produce a 2016 documentary film called Mixed Match that encourages mixed race and minority donors to register as adult donors.

Athena Asklipiadis

Due to the lack of diversity on the national and world bone marrow donor registries, Mixed Marrow was started in 2009 to increase the numbers of mixed race donors.

Prior to Mixed Marrow starting, other ethnic recruiters like Asians for Miracle Marrow Matches (A3M), based in Los Angeles, CA and Asian American Donor Program (AADP), based in Alameda, CA had been raising awareness in the Asian and minority communities for decades.  Closing the racial gap on the registry was something I was very much interested in helping them with so I began my outreach on the most familiar medium I knew—social media.

Because matching relies heavily on similar inherited genetic markers, I was particularly astonished seeing the less than 3% (back in 2009) sliver of the ethnic pie that mixed race donors made up.  Caucasians made up for about 70% at the time, with all minorities making up for the difference.  The ethnic breakdown made sense when comparing against actual population numbers, but a larger pool of minority donors was definitely something needed especially when multiracial people were being reported as the fastest growing demographic in the US.  Odds were just not in the favor of non-white searching patients.

Current Be The Match ethnic breakdown as of 2016.

After getting to know a local mixed race searching patient, Krissy Kobata, and hearing of her struggles finding a match, I knew I had to do my best to reach out to fellow multiracial people, most of which were young and likely online.  At the time, I was engaged with fellow hapas (half in Hawaiian Pidgin, referring mixed heritage) and mixed people via multiracial community Facebook groups and other internet forums.  One common thing I noticed, unlike topics like identity, food and culture– health was definitely not widely talked about. So with that lack of awareness, Mixed Marrow began as a facebook page and later as a website.  With the help of organizations like A3M supplying Be The Match testing kits, Mixed Marrow was able to also exist outside of the virtual world by hosting donor recruitment drives at different cultural and college events.

Athena Asklipiadis, Krissy Kobata and Mixed Match director, Jeff Chiba Stearns

After about a year of advocacy, in 2010, I connected with filmmaker Jeff Chiba Stearns to pitch an idea for a documentary on the patients I worked with.  Telling their stories in words and on flyers was not effective enough for me, I felt that more people would be inclined to register as a donor if they got to know the patients as well as I did.  Thus, the film Mixed Match was born.

Still from Mixed Match, Imani (center) and parents, Darrick and Tammy.

Still from Mixed Match, Imani mother, Tammy.

Over the course of the next 6 years, Jeff and I went on a journey across the US to gather not only patient stories, but input from pioneers in stem cell transplantation like Dr. Paul Terasaki and Dr. John E. Wagner.  It was so important to share these transplant tales while being as accurate and informed as possible.

Still from Mixed Match – Dr. Paul Teriyaki.

Our goal was to educate audiences and present a call-to-action where everyone can learn how they can save a life. Mixed Match not only highlights bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation, but it also shares the possibilities of umbilical cord stem cells.

Mixed Match director, Jeff Chiba Stearns decided a great way to explain stem cell science and matching was through animation.  Stearns, with the help of animator, Kaho Yoshida, was able to reach across to non-medical expert audiences and create digestible and engaging imagery to teach what is usually very complex science.

Animation Still from Mixed Match.

At every screening we also make sure to host a bone marrow registry drive so audiences have the opportunity to sign up.  We have partnered with both the US national registry, Be The Match and Canadian Blood Services’ One Match registry.

Bone marrow drive at a Mixed Match screening in Toronto.

Nearly 8 years and about 40 cities later, Mixed Marrow has managed to spread advocacy for the need for more mixed race donors all over the US and even other countries like Canada, Japan, Korea and Austria all the while being completely volunteer-run.  It is our hope that through social media and film, Mixed Match, we can help share these important stories and save lives.

Further Information

A Clinical Trial Network Focused on Stem Cell Treatments is Expanding

Geoff Lomax is a Senior Officer of CIRM’s Strategic Initiatives.

California is one of the world-leaders in advancing stem cell research towards treatments and cures for patients with unmet medical needs. California has scientists at top universities and companies conducting cutting edge research in regenerative medicine. It also has CIRM, California’s Stem Cell Agency, which funds promising stem cell research and is advancing stem cell therapies into clinical trials. But the real clincher is that California has something that no one else has: a network of medical centers dedicated to stem cell-based clinical trials for patients. This first-of-its-kind system is called the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network.

Get to Know Our Alpha Clinics

In 2014, CIRM launched its Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network to accelerate the development and delivery of stem cell treatments to patients. The network consists of three Alpha Clinic sites at UC San Diego, City of Hope in Duarte, and a joint clinic between UC Los Angeles and UC Irvine. Less than three years since its inception, the Alpha Clinics are conducting 34 stem cell clinical trials for a diverse range of diseases such as cancer, heart disease and sickle cell anemia. You can find a complete list of these clinical trials on our Alpha Clinics website. Below is an informational video about our Alpha Clinics Network.

So far, hundreds of patients have been treated at our Alpha Clinics. These top-notch medical centers use CIRM-funding to build teams specialized in overseeing stem cell trials. These teams include patient navigators who provided in-depth information about clinical trials to prospective patients and support them during their treatment. They also include pharmacists who work with patients’ cells or manufactured stem cell-products before the therapies are given to patients. And lastly, let’s not forget the doctors and nurses that are specially trained in the delivery of stem cell therapies to patients.

The Alpha Clinics Network also offers resources and tools for clinical trial sponsors, the people responsible for conducting the trials. These include patient education and recruitment tools and access to over 20 million patients in California to support successful recruitment. And because the different clinical trial sites are in the same network, sponsors can benefit from sharing the same approval measures for a single trial at multiple sites.

Looking at the big picture, our Alpha Clinics Network provides a platform where patients can access the latest stem cell treatments, and sponsors can access expert teams at multiple medical centers to increase the likelihood that their trial succeeds.

The Alpha Clinics Network is expanding

This collective expertise has resulted in a 3-fold (from 12 to 36 – two trials are being conducted at two sites) increase in the number of stem cell clinical trials at the Alpha Clinic sites since the Network’s inception. And the number continues to rise every quarter. Given this impressive track record, CIRM’s Board voted in February to expand our Alpha Clinics Network. The Board approved up to $16 million to be awarded to two additional medical centers ($8 million each) to create new Alpha Clinic sites and work with the current Network to accelerate patient access to stem cell treatments.

CIRM’s Chairman Jonathan Thomas explained,

Jonathan Thomas

“We laid down the foundation for conducting high quality stem cell trials when we started this network in 2014. The success of these clinics in less than three years has prompted the CIRM Board to expand the Network to include two new trial sites. With this expansion, CIRM is building on the current network’s momentum to establish new and better ways of treating patients with stem cell-based therapies.”

The Alpha Clinics Network plays a vital role in CIRM’s five-year strategic plan to fund 50 new clinical trials by 2020. In fact, the Alpha Clinic Network supports clinical trials funded by CIRM, industry sponsors and other sources. Thus, the Network is on track to becoming a sustainable resource to deliver stem cell treatments indefinitely.

In addition to expanding CIRM’s Network, the new sites will develop specialized programs to train doctors in the design and conduct of stem cell clinical trials. This training will help drive the development of new stem cell therapies at California medical centers.

Apply to be one our new Alpha Clinics!

For the medical centers interested in joining the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network, the deadline for applications is May 15th, 2017. Details on this funding opportunity can be found on our funding page.

The CIRM Team looks forward to working with prospective applicants to address any questions. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network will also be showcasing it achievement at its Second Annual Symposium, details may be found on the City of Hope Alpha Clinics website.

City of Hope Medical Center and Alpha Stem Cell Clinic


Related Links:

License to heal: UC Davis deal looks to advance stem cell treatment for bone loss and arthritis

Nancy Lane

Wei Yao and Nancy Lane of UC Davis: Photo courtesy UC Davis

There are many challenges in taking even the most promising stem cell treatment and turning it into a commercial product approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). One of the biggest is expertise. The scientists who develop the therapy may be brilliant in the lab but have little experience or expertise in successfully getting their work through a clinical trial and ultimately to market.

That’s why a team at U.C. Davis has just signed a deal with a startup company to help them move a promising stem cell treatment for arthritis, osteoporosis and fractures out of the lab and into people.

The licensing agreement combines the business acumen of Regenerative Arthritis and Bone Medicine (RABOME) with the scientific chops of the UC Davis team, led by Nancy Lane and Wei Yao.

They plan to test a hybrid molecule called RAB-001 which has shown promise in helping direct mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) – these are cells typically found in the bone marrow and fat tissue – to help stimulate bone growth and increase existing bone mass and strength. This can help heal people suffering from conditions like osteoporosis or hard to heal fractures. RAB-001 has also shown promise in reducing inflammation and so could prove helpful in treating people with inflammatory arthritis.

Overcoming problems

In a news article on the UC Davis website, Wei Yao, said RAB-001 seems to solve a problem that has long puzzled researchers:

“There are many stem cells, even in elderly people, but they do not readily migrate to bone.  Finding a molecule that attaches to stem cells and guides them to the targets we need provides a real breakthrough.”

The UC Davis team already has approval to begin a Phase 1 clinical trial to test this approach on people with osteonecrosis, a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones. CIRM is funding this work.

The RABOME team also hopes to test RAB-001 in clinical trials for healing broken bones, osteoporosis and inflammatory arthritis.

CIRM solution

To help other researchers overcome these same regulatory hurdles in developing stem cell therapies CIRM created the Stem Cell Center with QuintilesIMS, a leading integrated information and technology-enabled healthcare service provider that has deep experience and therapeutic expertise. The Stem Cell Center will help researchers overcome the challenges of manufacturing and testing treatments to meet FDA standards, and then running a clinical trial to test that therapy in people.

Could Stem Cells Help Beat Multiple Sclerosis?

March is Multiple Sclerosis month. In honor of MS patients and research, we are featuring a guest blog from scientist and communicator Hamideh Emrani. Thoughts expressed here are not necessarily those of CIRM.

If you are reading this post, other than out of curiosity, chances are that you know someone who has been affected by Multiple Sclerosis (MS). This unpredictable and at times confusing disease has affected too many people in my circle of friends and family. I personally have spent hours reading about it and reading about possible treatments.

For instance, M, a really close friend of mine woke up one day and everything was blurry. She could see but it seemed as if there was a thick fog covering everything. After seeing her optometrist and being evaluated via multiple tests and an MRI scan, she was diagnosed with MS. The reason behind her blurred vision was inflammation of her optic nerves.

Why do MS symptoms happen?

The nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are connected through cellular extensions. Each cell has one long cellular extension at one end, called an axon, that looks similar to an electrical wire. Axons relay information using neural signals from one cell to another. Just as an electrical wire has a protective plastic cover to avoid leakage of electricity, these axons, are covered with a protective layer of a special fat called myelin.

The myelin on the outside of nerve cells is destroyed in patients with MS. (Source Wikimedia & Bruce Blaus)

In MS, a patient’s immune cells start to attack this protective layer in the central nervous system: the optic nerves, brain, and the spinal cord. They also attack the cells that produce myelin (called oligodendrocytes) and the injured nerve axon fibers. This results in de-myelination or the loss of myelin; and eventual deterioration and damage of the nerve axons. In turn, multiple scar tissues form on the damaged areas on nerves that can be seen through MRI, hence the name “multiple sclerosis” with sclerosis meaning scar tissue.

Generally, the demyelination and scar tissue will cause communication problems among nerves and the symptoms vary in each patient making it a complicated disease to treat. Some common resulting symptoms include excessive fatigue, pain, blurred vision, walking difficulties, muscle  stiffness and changes in brain-based skills such as memory and problem solving.

Depending on the stage of the disease and the extent of the damage, the disease has been categorized to four different courses.

MS Type Description
Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) The person has had one episode of neurological symptoms that may or may not be accompanied by damages seen in an MRI scan.

 

Relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) The most common type of MS, which is characterized by clearly defined periods of neurologic inflammation called “MS attacks” that can be followed by periods of partial or complete recovery. The person might be completely symptom free during these remission times.
Secondary progressive MS (SPMS) Many patients with RRMS over time transition to SPMS where there is no recovery from the symptoms and disability accumulates.

 

Primary progressive MS (PPMS) There are no remissions from the onset of the disease and disability caused by disease activity worsens over time.

What is the cause of MS?

MS is affecting a growing number of human populations. While the jury is still out to define the main cause, many scientists believe that various factors play a role such as genetic predisposition, viral and bacterial infections, and environmental cues. MS is mostly prominent in countries in the Northern hemisphere and colder climates. It affects more women than men, and is mostly diagnosed between the age of 35-50.

Treatments for MS

Unfortunately, there is no cure for MS at the moment. The drugs that are available, called MS modifying treatments, try to prevent the progression of the disease but they don’t reverse it. Instead, the drugs mostly modulate the immune system to avoid further attacks or treat symptoms such as fatigue, pain, and bladder issues that are caused by the damage.

How do stem cells come into picture?

Stem cells are unique cells with the ability to both self-renew and specialize into different cell types. This amazing regeneration ability has turned them into great sources for designing treatment strategies to replace the damaged cells in MS. Two stem cell treatment approaches for MS are currently in development. In one, the researchers try to reboot or modulate the patient’s immune system to prevent it from attacking the nerve cells. In the other, scientists focus on using stem cells to make oligodendrocytes to try and regenerate and repair lost and injured nervous tissue.

Overview of Recent Clinical Trials

The most common stem cells used in clinical trials are the blood, or haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which are isolated from the bone marrow. Haematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) have been used for decades to treat blood cancers such as leukemias, but the first time they were studied for treating MS was in the 1990s.

In this method, the patient’s HSCs are collected from the bone marrow and stored. Then, the patient’s immune system, including the bone marrow, is completely depleted through chemotherapy. Finally, the stem cells are transplanted back into the body and after a few months eventually build up a new immune system.

Just last month, Dr. Paolo Muraro et al. published a report that reviews such clinical trials and the long-term outcomes for the patients. They evaluated data for 281 patients from 25 centers in 13 countries that were followed an average of 6.5 years after the transplant. At the end they conclude that almost half of the patients receiving HSCT did not have any progression of the disease. And, younger patients with the most common form of MS, RRMS, who had less disability going into the trial, and had gone through less disease modifying treatments had a better outcome. (73% were progression free at the  5 year mark).

Additionally, over the past two years three separate phase two clinical trials in Northern America have reported results:

  • In the HALT-MS trial, a small number (24) of patients with, RRMS, whose disease was not controlled by any medications, underwent HSCT. After 5 years, 91.3% of the patients did not show any sign of disease progression.
  • In June 2016, a Canadian team of researchers reported the results of a long term follow up of an aHSCT trial (the “a” stands for autologous, meaning it used the patient’s own cells) on 24 patients whose MS had progressed even after receiving conventional treatments. After up to 13 years after the transplantation, no relapses were evident, and 35% of the patients experienced reversals in their level of disability.
  • Back in 2015, Burt et al. reported their HSCT treatment regimen for 123 RRMS patients and their follow up of up to 4 years. In their study, instead of completely depleting the patient’s immune system, they just suppressed it and performed the transplants. Their data suggest that there was no disease progression in 87% of individuals who had MS for less than 10 years.

Will Stem Cells be used for treatment of MS in the near future?

Even though the initial results of the HSCT clinical trials sound promising, the risks that are involved are not easy to ignore.  In all the mentioned trials, there were side effects related to the transplant. There were also a total of nine deaths reported in all the studies combined (since 1990s). However, most of these deaths occurred before the year of 2000 and they were attributed to transplantation techniques and patient selection methods. Over the years, researchers have been working hard to fine tune the techniques and made the procedure safer. But even now it is important for the patients to weigh the benefits and the risks before undergoing the procedure.

That’s why neurologists and stem cell scientists do not currently recommend  blood stem cell transplants as the top-of-the-line treatment option for most MS patients. Other types of stem cells are being investigated for their potential in deriving oligodendrocytes and nerve cells to re-myelinate and repair the damaged ones. However, they are still in development and have not reached a clinical trial in people.

At the moment, many stem cell treatment approaches are all at the experimental level and more research is needed to completely prove them to be safe and effective. There are many trusted sources to get information from and the international society for stem cell research (ISSCR) has produced a great nine step guideline for patients and family members considering stem cell treatments. Also the national MS society website is a great resource for learning more about Multiple Sclerosis, including participating in clinical trial studies.


Hamideh Emrani

Hamideh Emrani is a science and technology communicator in Toronto, Canada. She is a graduate of UC Berkeley and has a Masters degree from the University of Toronto. You can follow Hamideh on Twitter.

Teach your kids about stem cells and science with Think-A-Lot-Tots children’s books

It’s never too early to start learning.

When it comes to teaching science to kids, here’s my advice: don’t shy away from talking about topics like mitochondria or nuclei. Children are curious and intelligent. They can understand complex scientific concepts if you engage them in the right way. So it’s time to set aside the baby talk and educate young minds about science early so that they can understand their own biology and the world around them.

There are many ways to educate kids about science, but a tried and true method is children’s picture books. Images capture children’s attention and tell a visual story that connects with their brains better than words can on their own.

Thomai Dion

Thomai Dion

One of my favorite children’s science books is a series called “Think-A-Lot-Tots.” They are written for babies, toddlers and kids and have beautiful hand-drawn illustrations. The author, Dr. Thomai Dion, is a pharmacist and science writer who was inspired to write this series to satisfy her young son’s curiosity for science. So far she has written books about animal cells, neurons, microorganisms, and just this week, she published a new book about stem cells!

I have to admit that I’m to blame for this new stem cell book. When I first read her stories, I was so excited by how simply and elegantly she wrote about neurons, that I started daydreaming about a children’s book on stem cells. I contacted Thomai and asked her whether she wanted to collaborate on a stem cell book. She was very eager, so I wrote the initial script and Thomai used her artistic expertise to visualize my ideas.  Fast forward three months and Thomai has turned my dream into a wonderful book that I can share with my family and friends with kids!

The stem cell book covers the basics, starting with what a stem cell is and then expanding into the different types of stem cells in the body. By the end, kids will understand that they come from embryonic stem cells and that they have adult stem cells in their body that keep them healthy.

Below are a few pages from Think-A-Lot-Tots: Stem Cells and also a short interview where Thomai explains her inspiration behind her children’s book series and her newest edition on stem cells.

41w9lwy6qhlpluripotent

somatic-stem-cellsbrain

Interview with Author Thomai Dion

Q: Tell us about the mission of your Think-A-Lot-Tots series.

TD: The mission for my “Think-A-Lot-Tots” series is to introduce science education to our youngest thinkers in a fun, approachable and engaging way. My books do not strive to make an expert of the reader; rather, they provide an overview of a seemingly abstract and advanced scientific concept otherwise reserved for “older children” in an effort to show that babies, toddlers and younger kids can not only retain but also enjoy these same topics. My books focus on building scientific vocabulary, promoting STEM education at a very young age and sparking a love of learning as soon as possible.

Q: How did you get interested in writing children’s books about science?

TD: It was my son’s questions about the world around him that made me want to teach him as much as I could about all that I could. Similar to other children, several of his questions would revolve around topics such as why the sky is blue and why the grass is green. He has also pleasantly surprised me with several very insightful inquiries such as why do “tall trees” lose their leaves but pines trees do not, as well as “how do my eyes see?”. His natural inclination to ask “why” coupled with an insatiable desire to learn inspired me to teach him about science-focused concepts beyond what is readily seen such as the cell, the neuron and microorganisms. I created my first book as a helpful way for him and I to talk about topics like the cell, and I thought since I was making this available to my family, I may as well make it available to others. As such, my first book was created and 4 others have followed with a 5th nearly finished.

Q: Why were you inspired to write a book about stem cells?

TD: My first children’s science book focused on the parts of the cell, providing an overview of the cell membrane, the nucleus, mitochondria and others. My second book focused on the neuron, which discussed not only its different parts but also its special function within our bodies. I found that I enjoyed not only talking about what a cell or neuron was but also why it was important, and so I began thinking about what other ideas I could write about in this manner.

I am a pharmacist by trade and although familiar with stem cells, I was not initially as knowledgeable as I would have liked to be about what their function was within the body, what types of work were currently being done with regards to their research, and what a significant impact they could have on science and medicine. I learned more about all of this as I connected with folks within the field who focused on stem cell research, and only then did I realize how important it was for not only myself to understand stem cells but also our future big thinkers.

I was thrilled when you reached out to me with the idea of writing a book about stem cells and am so thankful for the guidance and expertise you provided with the creation of “Think-A-Lot-Tots: Stem Cells”. My little one will be 4-years-old soon and we’ve read the book together several times. To hear a child want to talk about and exclaim “stem cells!” before they have even begun elementary school is so wonderful!

Q: What other types of science books are you planning to write?

TD: I admittedly have an entire list of topics that I’d like to write about for children’s STEM education. As a medical professional, most of these topics can be found within biology, anatomy and physiology, although I do have some ideas that introduce concepts within chemistry and other areas as well. I am a few days away from officially releasing a STEM coloring book and it would be a very exciting area to explore further with additional coloring and activity books in the future. I also currently have a children’s notebook available that outlines the steps found within the scientific method and I’d love to continue creating hands-on learning tools in addition to read-along books.

Q: What are your insights for the best ways to teach young kids science?

TD: I think we vastly underestimate our children’s ability to learn about their world. Provided the child has an interest in learning about a topic, I don’t see any limitation in explaining the facets of that topics or introducing the terminology typically associated with its discussion. I truly believe there is no difference between teaching a child the word “ball” and the word “nucleus”; rather, it builds familiarity with the term and could even be associated with enjoyable memories if presented in a fun and engaging way.

Similarly to teaching about scientific terminology, science as a whole does not have to be limited to an academic setting and only after a certain age. In reality, children are naturally-born scientists, eager to inquire about any and everything around them from the very beginning of their childhood. I recently wrote an article discussing this concept that was published in Ar Magazine entitled “The Science of Why and its Impact on Children’s Learning”.

In summary and to quote part of this article, I note that “My son and I talk together constantly throughout the day about his observations, what he thinks of this leaf or that rock. I also read to him daily either the books that I created myself as well as those from other talented authors and illustrators. To hinder my child’s natural aptitude towards science would be to mute his interest in the world around him. More simply stated, my brushing-off his questions would stifle his drive to learn. In my humble opinion, I cannot bring myself to do that.” In short, I would say the best ways to teach young kids about science would be to: Talk together. Talk often. Talk about it all.


You can find Thomai’s Think-A-Lot-Tots science books on Amazon and learn more about her quest to educate young minds on her website.

Partnering with the best to help find cures for rare diseases

As a state agency we focus most of our efforts and nearly all our money on California. That’s what we were set up to do. But that doesn’t mean we don’t also look outside the borders of California to try and find the best research, and the most promising therapies, to help people in need.

Today’s meeting of the CIRM Board was the first time we have had a chance to partner with one of the leading research facilities in the country focusing on children and rare diseases; St. Jude Children’s Researech Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

a4da990e3de7a2112ee875fc784deeafSt. Jude is getting $11.9 million to run a Phase I/II clinical trial for x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disorder (SCID), a catastrophic condition where children are born without a functioning immune system. Because they are unable to fight off infections, many children born with SCID die in the first few years of life.

St. Jude is teaming up with researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) to genetically modify the patient’s own blood stem cells, hopefully creating a new blood system and repairing the damaged immune system. St. Jude came up with the method of doing this, UCSF will treat the patients. Having that California component to the clinical trial is what makes it possible for us to fund this work.

This is the first time CIRM has funded work with St. Jude and reflects our commitment to moving the most promising research into clinical trials in people, regardless of whether that work originates inside or outside California.

The Board also voted to fund researchers at Cedars-Sinai to run a clinical trial on ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Like SCID, ALS is a rare disease. As Randy Mills, our President and CEO, said in a news release:

CIRM CEO and President, Randy Mills.

CIRM CEO and President, Randy Mills.

“While making a funding decision at CIRM we don’t just look at how many people are affected by a disease, we also look at the severity of the disease on the individual and the potential for impacting other diseases. While the number of patients afflicted by these two diseases may be small, their need is great. Additionally, the potential to use these approaches in treating other disease is very real. The underlying technology used in treating SCID, for example, has potential application in other areas such as sickle cell disease and HIV/AIDS.”

We have written several blogs about the research that cured children with SCID.

The Board also approved funding for a clinical trial to develop a treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). This is an autoimmune disease that affects around 1.25 million Americans, and millions more around the globe.

T1D is where the body’s own immune system attacks the cells that produce insulin, which is needed to control blood sugar levels. If left untreated it can result in serious, even life-threatening, complications such as vision loss, kidney damage and heart attacks.

Researchers at Caladrius Biosciences will take cells, called regulatory T cells (Tregs), from the patient’s own immune system, expand the number of those cells in the lab and enhance them to make them more effective at preventing the autoimmune attack on the insulin-producing cells.

The focus is on newly-diagnosed adolescents because studies show that at the time of diagnosis T1D patients usually have around 20 percent of their insulin-producing cells still intact. It’s hoped by intervening early the therapy can protect those cells and reduce the need for patients to rely on insulin injections.

David J. Mazzo, Ph.D., CEO of Caladrius Biosciences, says this is hopeful news for people with type 1 diabetes:

David Mazzo

David Mazzo

“We firmly believe that this therapy has the potential to improve the lives of people with T1D and this grant helps us advance our Phase 2 clinical study with the goal of determining the potential for CLBS03 to be an effective therapy in this important indication.”

 


Related Links:

Wishing You and Your Stem Cells a Happy Valentine’s Day!

cirm-valentines-day

Roses are Red, 

Violets are Blue,

 Let’s thank pluripotent stem cells,

For making humans like me and you

Happy Valentine’s Day from me and everyone at CIRM! Today, we are celebrating this day of love by sending our warmest wishes to you our readers. We’re grateful for your interest in learning more about stem cells and your steadfast support for the advancement of stem cell research.

We also want to wish a Happy Valentine’s Day to your stem cells, yes that’s right the stem cells you have in your body. Without pluripotent stem cells, which are embryonic cells that generate all the cells in your body, humans wouldn’t exist. And without adult stem cells, which live in your tissues and organs, we wouldn’t have healthy, functioning bodies.

So, as you’re wishing your loved ones, friends, and colleagues a Happy Valentine’s Day, take a moment to thank your body and the stem cells living in it for keeping you alive.

I’ll leave you with a few Valentine’s Day themed stem cell blogs for you to enjoy. Have a wonderful day!


Valentine’s Day Themed Blogs:

1) Toronto Scientists Have an Affair with the Heart by OIRMexpression

Ventricular heart muscle cells. Image courtesy of Dr. Michael Laflamme

Ventricular heart muscle cells. Image courtesy of Dr. Michael Laflamme

2) A Cardiac Love Triangle: How Transcription Factors Interact to Make a Heart by the Stem Cellar

© Gladstone Institutes photo credit: Kim Cordes / Gladstone Institute Lay Description: In this image, human embryonic stem cells have been differentiated into cardiomyocytes, or heart muscle cells, and stained to show the expression of cardiac Troponin T (red), a protein that helps cardiomyocytes to contract, and cell nuclei (blue). Scientific Description: Cultured human iPSCs reprogrammed into CMs. Stain for cTnT (red), and DAPI (blue). Original caption: cardiomyocytes.tif

Heart cells made from human induced pluripotent stem cells. © Gladstone Institutes
photo credit: Kim Cordes / Gladstone Institute

3) Stem Cells on Valentine’s Day: Update on Cardiac Regenerative Medicine by Paul Knoepfler on the Niche Blog

4) Hope For Broken Hearts this Valentine’s Day – a Clinical Trial to Repair the Damage by the Stem Cellar


Special thanks to Samantha Yammine for letting us her her “Icy Astrocytes” photo in our Valentine’s Day graphic.

Stem Cell Stories That Caught our Eye: Making blood and muscle from stem cells and helping students realize their “pluripotential”

Stem cells offer new drug for blood diseases. A new treatment for blood disorders might be in the works thanks to a stem cell-based study out of Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s hospital. Their study was published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The teams made induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the skin of patients with a rare blood disorder called Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) – a bone marrow disease that prevents new blood cells from forming. iPSCs from DBA patients were then specialized into blood progenitor cells, the precursors to blood cells. However, these precursor cells were incapable of forming red blood cells in a dish like normal precursors do.

Red blood cells were successfully made via induced pluripotent stem cells from a Diamond-Blackfan anemia patient. Image: Daley lab, Boston Children’s

Red blood cells were successfully made via induced pluripotent stem cells from a Diamond-Blackfan anemia patient. Image: Daley lab, Boston Children’s

The blood progenitor cells from DBA patients were then used to screen a library of compounds to identify drugs that could get the DBA progenitor cells to develop into red blood cells. They found a compound called SMER28 that had this very effect on progenitor cells in a dish. When the compound was tested in zebrafish and mouse models of DBA, the researchers observed an increase in red blood cell production and a reduction of anemia symptoms.

Getting pluripotent stem cells like iPSCs to turn into blood progenitor cells and expand these cells into a population large enough for drug screening has not been an easy task for stem cell researchers.

Co-first author on the study, Sergei Doulatov, explained in a press release, “iPS cells have been hard to instruct when it comes to making blood. This is the first time iPS cells have been used to identify a drug to treat a blood disorder.”

In the future, the researchers will pursue the questions of why and how SMER28 boosts red blood cell generation. Further work will be done to determine whether this drug will be a useful treatment for DBA patients and other blood disorders.

 

Students realize their “pluripotential”. In last week’s stem cell stories, I gave a preview about an exciting stem cell “Day of Discovery” hosted by USC Stem Cell in southern California. The event happened this past Saturday. Over 500 local middle and high school students attended the event and participated in lab tours, poster sessions, and a career resource fair. Throughout the day, they were engaged by scientists and educators about stem cell science through interactive games, including the stem cell edition of Family Feud and a stem cell smartphone videogame developed by USC graduate students.

In a USC press release, Rohit Varma, dean of the Keck School of Medicine of USC, emphasized the importance of exposing young students to research and scientific careers.

“It was a true joy to welcome the middle and high school students from our neighboring communities in Boyle Heights, El Sereno, Lincoln Heights, the San Gabriel Valley and throughout Los Angeles. This bright young generation brings tremendous potential to their future pursuits in biotechnology and beyond.”

Maria Elena Kennedy, a consultant to the Bassett Unified School District, added, “The exposure to the Keck School of Medicine of USC is invaluable for the students. Our students come from a Title I School District, and they don’t often have the opportunity to come to a campus like the Keck School of Medicine.”

The day was a huge success with students posting photos of their experiences on social media and enthusiastically writing messages like “stem cells are our future” and “USC is my goal”. One high school student acknowledged the opportunity that this day offers to students, “California currently has biotechnology as the biggest growing sector. Right now, it’s really important that students are visiting labs and learning more about the industry, so they can potentially see where they’re going with their lives and careers.”

You can read more about USC’s Stem Cell Day of Discovery here. Below are a few pictures from the event courtesy of David Sprague and USC.

Students have fun with robots representing osteoblast and osteoclast cells at the Stem Cell Day of Discovery event held at the USC Health Sciences Campus in Los Angeles, CA. February 4th, 2017. The event encourages students to learn more about STEM opportunities, including stem cell study and biotech, and helps demystify the fields and encourage student engagement. Photo by David Sprague

Students have fun with robots representing osteoblast and osteoclast cells at the USC Stem Cell Day of Discovery. Photo by David Sprague

Dr. Francesca Mariana shows off a mouse skeleton that has been dyed to show bones and cartilage at the Stem Cell Day of Discovery event held at the USC Health Sciences Campus in Los Angeles, CA. February 4th, 2017. The event encourages students to learn more about STEM opportunities, including stem cell study and biotech, and helps demystify the fields and encourage student engagement. Photo by David Sprague

Dr. Francesca Mariana shows off a mouse skeleton that has been dyed to show bones and cartilage. Photo by David Sprague

USC masters student Shantae Thornton shows students how cells are held in long term cold storage tanks at -195 celsius at the Stem Cell Day of Discovery event held at the USC Health Sciences Campus in Los Angeles, CA. February 4th, 2017. The event encourages students to learn more about STEM opportunities, including stem cell study and biotech, and helps demystify the fields and encourage student engagement. Photo by David Sprague

USC masters student Shantae Thornton shows students how cells are held in long term cold storage tanks at -195 celsius. Photo by David Sprague

Genesis Archila, left, and Jasmine Archila get their picture taken at the Stem Cell Day of Discovery event held at the USC Health Sciences Campus in Los Angeles, CA. February 4th, 2017. The event encourages students to learn more about STEM opportunities, including stem cell study and biotech, and helps demystify the fields and encourage student engagement. Photo by David Sprague

Genesis Archila, left, and Jasmine Archila get their picture taken at the USC Stem Cell Day of Discovery. Photo by David Sprague

New stem cell recipes for making muscle: new inroads to study muscular dystrophy (Todd Dubnicoff)

Embryonic stem cells are amazing because scientists can change or specialize them into virtually any cell type. But it’s a lot easier said than done. Researchers essentially need to mimic the process of embryo development in a petri dish by adding the right combination of factors to the stem cells in just the right order at just the right time to obtain a desired type of cell.

Making human muscle tissue from embryonic stem cells has proven to be a challenge. The development of muscle, as well as cartilage and bone, are well characterized and known to form from an embryonic structure called a somite. Researches have even been successful working out the conditions for making somites from animal stem cells. But those recipes didn’t work well with human stem cells.

Now, a team of researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has overcome this roadblock by carrying out a systematic approach using human tissue. As described in Cell Reports, the scientists isolated somites from early human embryos and studied their gene activity. By comparing somites that were just beginning to emerge with fully formed somites, the researchers pinpointed differences in gene activity patterns. With this data in hand, the team added factors to the cells that were known to affect the activity of those genes. Through some trial and error, they produced a recipe – different than those used in animal cells – that could convert 90 percent of the human stem cells into somites in only four days. Those somites could then readily transform into muscle or bone or cartilage.

This new method for making human muscle will be critical for the lab’s goal to develop therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an incurable muscle wasting disease that strikes young boys and is usually fatal by their 20’s.

The new protocol turned 90 percent of human pluripotent stem cells into somite cells in just four days; those somite cells then generated (left to right) cartilage, bone and muscle cells.  Image: April Pyle Lab/UCLA

The new protocol turned 90 percent of human pluripotent stem cells into somite cells in just four days; those somite cells then generated (left to right) cartilage, bone and muscle cells. Image: April Pyle Lab/UCLA