Stem Cell Roundup: Protein shows promise in treating deadliest form of breast cancer: mosquito spit primes our body for disease

Triple negative breast cancerTriple negative breast cancer is more aggressive and difficult to treat than other forms of the disease and, as a result, is more likely to spread throughout the body and to recur after treatment. Now a team at the University of Southern California have identified a protein that could help change that.

The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, showed that a protein called TAK1 allows cancer cells from the tumor to migrate to the lungs and then form new tumors which can spread throughout the body. There is already an FDA-approved drug called OXO that has been shown to block TAK1, but this does not survive in the blood so it’s hard to deliver to the lungs.

The USC team found a way of using nanoparticles, essentially a tiny delivery system, to take OXO and carry it to the lungs to attack the cancer cells and stop them spreading.

triple_negative_breast_cancer_particle_graphic-768x651In a news release Min Yu, the principal investigator on the team, said that although this has only been tested in mice the results are encouraging:

“For patients with triple-negative breast cancer, systemic chemotherapies are largely ineffective and highly toxic. So, nanoparticles are a promising approach for delivering more targeted treatments, such as OXO, to stop the deadly process of metastasis.”

Mosquito spit and your immune system

Mosquito

Mosquito bite: Photo courtesy National Academy of Sciences

Anyone who has ever been bitten by a mosquito knows that it can be itchy and irritable for hours afterwards. But now scientists say the impact of that bite can last for much longer, days in fact, and even help prime your body for disease.

The scientists say that every time a mosquito bites you they inject saliva into the bite to keep the blood flowing freely. But that saliva also has an impact on your immune system, leaving it more vulnerable to diseases like malaria.

OK, so that’s fascinating, and really quite disgusting, but what does it have to do with stem cells? Well, researchers at the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Malaria and Vector Research Laboratory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia engrafted human stem cells into mice to study the problem.

They found that mice with the human stem cells developed more severe symptoms of dengue fever if they were bitten by a mosquito than if they were just injected with dengue fever.

In an article in Popular Science Jessica Manning, an infectious disease expert at the NIH, said previously we had no idea that mosquito spit had such a big impact on us:

“The virus present in that mosquito’s saliva, it’s like a Trojan horse. Your body is distracted by the saliva [and] having an allergic reaction when really it should be having an antiviral reaction and fighting against the virus. Your body is unwittingly helping the virus establish infection because your immune system is sending in new waves of cells that this virus is able to infect.”

The good news is that if we can develop a vaccine against the saliva we may be able to protect people against malaria, dengue fever, Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases.

Breaking down barriers to advance stem cell therapies – the view from the Vatican conference

Perry and the Pope

Pope Francis meets Katy Perry at the Unite to Cure conference at the Vatican

All hands were on deck at the “Unite to Cure” conference, organized by the Cura Foundation and the Vatican Pontifical Council,  and held at the Vatican on April 26-28. Religious leaders, scientists, physicians, philanthropists, industry leaders, government, academic leaders and members of the entertainment industry gathered to discuss how to improve human health and to increase access to relief of suffering for the under-served around the world.

Pope Francis spoke of “the great strides made by scientific research in discovering and making available new cures” but stressed that science also needs to have “an increased awareness of our ethical responsibility towards humanity and the environment in which we live.”

He talked of the importance of addressing the needs of children and young people, of helping the marginalized and those with rare, autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. He said:

“The problem of human suffering challenges us to create new means of interaction between individuals and institutions, breaking down barriers and working together to enhance patient care.”

So, it was appropriate that breaking down barriers and improving collaboration was the theme of a panel discussion featuring CIRM’s President and CEO, Maria Millan. She had been invited to attend the conference and participate on a panel focusing on “Public Private Partnerships to Accelerate Discoveries”.

As Dr. Millan put it, “Collaboration, communication, and alignment” is the winning formula for public/private partnerships.

She highlighted how CIRM exemplifies this new approach, how everything we do is focused on accelerating the field and that means partnering with the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration to create new regulatory models. It also means working with scientists every step of the way; helping them prepare the best possible application for CIRM funding and, if they are approved, giving them the support they need to help them succeed.

It was a wide ranging, thoughtful, engaging conversation with David J. Mazzo, PhD, President & CEO of Caladrius Biosciences and David  Pearce, PhD, Executive VP for Research at Sanford Health. You can watch the discussion here.

People may find it surprising that government agencies, academic researchers and private companies can all collaborate effectively.  It is absolutely critical to do so in order to rapidly and safely advance transformative stem cell, gene and regenerative medicine to patients with unmet medical needs.  Pope Francis and the Pontifical Council at the Vatican certainly believe that collaboration is essential and the “Unite to Cure” Conference was a powerful demonstration of how important it is to work together for the future of humanity.

TELL ME WHAT I NEED TO KNOW: A Patient Advocate’s guide to being a Patient Advocate

A few weeks ago I was at the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Network Symposium at UCLA and was fortunate enough to hear Gianna McMillan speak about patient advocacy. It was a powerful, moving, funny, and truly engaging talk. I quickly realized I wanted to blog about her talk and so for the first few minutes I was busy taking notes as fast as I could.  And then I realized that a simple blog could never do justice to what Gianna was saying, that what we needed was to run the whole presentation. So here it is.

Gianna McMillan

Gianna McMillan at the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Symposium: Photo courtesy UCLA

TELL ME WHAT I NEED TO KNOW

Gianna McMillan, MA – Patient/Subject Advocate, Bioethics Institute at Loyola Marymount University

Stem cell research and regenerative medicine are appealing topics because patients, families and society are weary of inelegant medical interventions that inflict, in some cases, as much harm as benefit. We are tired of putting poison in our loved ones to kill their cancer or feeling helpless as other diseases attack our own bodily functions. California, full of dreamers and go-getters, has enthusiastically embraced this new technology—but it is important to remember that all biomedical research— even in a new field as exciting and inspiring as stem cell therapeutics – must adhere to basic premises. It must be valid science and it must be based on an ethical partnership with patients and research subjects.

In the world of research ethics, I wear a lot of hats. I have been a subject, a care-giver, an Institutional Review Board (IRB) member (someone who actually reviews and approves research studies before they are allowed to proceed), and I have worked with the government on regulatory committees. These days I am finishing my doctoral studies in Bioethics, and while I love the interplay of philosophy and ethical principles, I most truly identify as an in-the-trenches Patient/Subject Advocate. I am compelled to champion patients who struggle with new and devastating diagnoses, hoping desperately for a cure, and who might be faced with decisions about participating in research for their own benefit and for the greater good of science.

In the old days, doctors made decisions on behalf of their patients— who, meekly grateful for the guidance, did whatever they were told. It is a little different now. Patients are better informed, often do their own homework, and demand to be an integral part of their treatment plan. The world of research has undergone similar changes. Instead of investigators “doing things to research subjects”, best practices involve patients in the design of clinical trials. Patients and experienced subjects help decide what specific questions should be the focus of the research; they identify endpoints in the research that are meaningful to the patient population being studied; and they assist in devising tools for patient-reported outcomes and delivery of study results.

The investigator and the research subject have come to be seen as partners.

While the evolution of this important relationship is healthy and wonderful, it should not be assumed that this is an equal partnership. Why? Because subjects are always at a disadvantage.  I realize that this might be an uncomfortable concept. Physician-investigators in charge of the study might want to qualify this statement it by insisting “but we do our best to accommodate their needs”. Subjects would also rather not admit this—because it is hard to make a decision with confidence while simultaneously acknowledging, “I am really at a disadvantage here.”

However, I have learned the hard way that an honest partnership requires addressing some uncomfortable realities.

A short personal story illustrates what I am talking about. When my oldest son was five years old, he was diagnosed with malignant brain cancer. Before meeting with our son’s treatment team for the first time, my husband and I decided that my husband, articulate and concise, would take the lead. He had a legal pad, with a list of questions… each question and answer would take us down the page until, at last, we would use all the information to make a decision—a life or death decision – on behalf of our young child.

In the meeting, the neurosurgeon pointed at brain scans and explained a few things. And then radiologist drew pictures of machines and treatment angles. The oncologist described risks and benefits and side effects. Then we all looked expectantly at my husband—because it was his turn. This lovely man opened his mouth. And closed his mouth. And then burst into tears, holding that legal pad over his chest like a shield. He could not speak. After a few seconds of horrified silence, I stammered out what few questions I could remember. The doctors answered, of course. Their mouths moved, and I leaned in and nodded while making eye contact – but I have no idea what they said.  All I heard was a loud white noise that filled my skull and my husband’s raspy breathing, and my own voice crying out in my head – “Oh my God! My child! My child!”

The point of this story is to illustrate that good people, educated and prepared, ready to bring their best selves to make the most important decision they would ever make, one that would affect the life of a beloved child— these people could not function. Despite this, in just a few days’ time, we were introduced to a research study, one that might cure our child while limiting the damage to his growing brain.  No matter how well-intentioned the research team was—no matter how desirous they were of a “partnership” with us, we were at such a distinct disadvantage, that the relationship we had with these investigators could not be categorized as one “among equals”.

Even now, more than twenty years later, it is painful for me to reflect on this. But I have learned, working with hundreds of families whose children went into clinical trials, that if we can be honest about the dysfunctional nature of this situation, we might take some action to improve it. Let me be specific about the ways research subjects are at a disadvantage.

  1. They often don’t speak the language of the disease.
  2. They are unfamiliar with the process of research.
  3. They are wrestling with emotions: despair, denial, anger and hope.
  4. Their life has been disrupted – and there are consequences.

Compare this with the research team, who knows the lingo, designed the research plan, is not personally affected by the scenario and well, this is business as usual: enroll a subject, let’s get going! How is the notion of “partnership” affected by such unequal circumstances?

Is a meaningful “partnership” even possible?

I say, yes! And this notion of “partnership” is especially important as new technologies come to invade intimate qualities of “self” and the building blocks of what makes each of us human. However, we need to be realistic about what this partnership looks like. It is not equal.  I am going to take a stand here and say that the partner who has the advantage (in this case, the researcher/scientist) is morally obligated to meaningfully address the disadvantage of the other party. This bears repeating. The partner who has the advantage is morally obligated to meaningfully address the disadvantage of the other party.

Over the years, families and subjects have told me what they want and need from the doctors and researchers they work with. They say:

  1. Tell me what I need to know.
  2. Tell me in a way I can hear it.
  3. Tell me again and again.

Let me expand on these a bit. First, if I am a patient new to a diagnosis, a treatment or research—I probably do not know what I do not know. Help me learn vocabulary, procedures, and systems. Tell me about the elements of informed consent so that I recognize them when I see them in the documents you want me to sign. Explain the difference between “standard of care” and “experimental treatment”. Help me understand the research question in the context of the disease (in general) and my own ailment (in particular). Give me the words to ask the questions that I should be asking.

Secondly, there are many different ways of sharing this information: print, video, websites, peer mentors, nurse-educators, and research team members. Hit the topic from all sides and in multiple formats. Thirdly, please realize that there is a learning curve for me— and it is closely tied to my emotional journey with my predicament. I may not be able to absorb certain facts at the very beginning, but a few weeks later I might be mentally and cognitively in a different place. And obviously, I might be an inexperienced research subject when I sign the consent form— but a few months later I will be vastly more sophisticated and at that time, I need the opportunity to ask my more considered and context-savvy questions.

I want to point out that researchers have access to a deep well of wisdom – a resource that can advise and support ethical actions that will help their disadvantaged partners: researchers can ask their experienced subjects for advice.

Remember those hundreds of families I worked with, whose children ultimately enrolled in clinical trials? These experienced parents say:

  • Let me tell you what I needed to know.
  • Let me tell you how I needed to hear it.

Getting input from these experienced subjects and caregivers does two things.

First, the research team is leveraging the investment they have already made in the participants of their studies; and secondly — very importantly — they are empowering the previously disadvantaged partner. Experienced subjects can to share what they have learned or give suggestions to the research team. Physicians and researchers might even build a stable of peer mentors who might be willing to help newbies learn about the process.

Everything I have said applies to all avenues of clinical research, but these are especially important considerations in the face of new and exciting science. It took a long time for more traditional research practices to evolve into an investigator/subject partnership model. Stem cell research and regenerative medicine has the opportunity to do this from the very start—and benefit from previous lessons learned.

When I was preparing my remarks for today, someone casually mentioned that I might talk about the “importance of balancing truth-telling in the informed consent process with respect for the hope of the family.” I would like to unequivocally state that the very nature of an “informed consent process” requires 100% truth, as does respect for the family—and that this does not undermine our capacity for hope. We place our hope in this exciting new science and the doctors and researchers who are pioneers. We understand that there are many unknowns in this new field. Please be honest with us so that we might sort out our thoughts and our hopes for ourselves, in our own contexts.

What message would I wish the scientists here, today, to take away with them?      Well, I am putting on my Patient/Subject Advocate hat, and in my Patient/Subject Advocate voice, I am saying: “Tell me what I need to know!”

 

 

CIRM applauds FDA crackdown on stem cell clinics that “peddle unapproved treatments.”

FDA

CIRM is commending the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its action against two stem cell clinics offering unapproved therapies.

On Wednesday, the FDA filed two complaints in federal court seeking a permanent injunction against California Stem Cell Treatment Center Inc. and US Stem Cell Clinic LLC. of Sunrise, Florida. The FDA says the clinics are marketing stem cell products without FDA approval and are not complying with current good manufacturing practice requirements.

“We strongly support the FDA’s strong stance to seek judicial action to stop these  clinics from marketing unproven therapies that pose a threat to the safety of patients” says Maria T. Millan, M.D., CIRM’s President and CEO. “We agree with FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb’s statement that these ‘bad actors leverage the scientific promise of this field to peddle unapproved treatments that put patients’ health at risk.’”

In his statement yesterday, Dr. Gottlieb denounced the clinics saying they are exploiting patients and causing some of them “serious and permanent harm.”

“In the two cases filed today, the clinics and their leadership have continued to disregard the law and more importantly, patient safety. We cannot allow unproven products that exploit the hope of patients and their loved ones. We support sound, scientific research and regulation of cell-based regenerative medicine, and the FDA has advanced a comprehensive policy framework to promote the approval of regenerative medicine products. But at the same time, the FDA will continue to take enforcement actions against clinics that abuse the trust of patients and endanger their health.”

At CIRM, we believe it is critically important for participants in stem cell treatments to be fully informed about the nature of the therapy they are receiving, including whether it is approved by the FDA. Last year we partnered with California State Senator Ed Hernandez to pass Senate Bill No. 512, which required all clinics offering unproven stem cell therapies to post notices warning patients they were getting a therapy that was not approved by the FDA.

The Stem Cell Agency has taken several other actions to protect people seeking legitimate stem cell therapies.

  • All the clinical trials we consider for funding must already have an active Investigational New Drug (IND) status with the FDA and go through a rigorous scientific review by leading experts.
  • All CIRM-funded trials must adhere to strict regulatory standards and safety monitoring.
  • We have created the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics, a network of six top California medical centers that specialize in delivering patient-centered stem cell clinical trials that meet the highest standards of care and research.
  • CIRM provides access to information on all the clinical trials it supports.

“Through its funding mechanism, active partnership and infrastructure programs, CIRM has shepherded 48 FDA regulated, scientifically sound, rigorously reviewed promising stem cell and regenerative medicine projects into clinical trials,” says Dr. Millan. “Some of these treatment protocols have already started to show preliminary signs of benefit for debilitating and life-threatening disorders. We are committed to doing all we can, in partnership with patients, the research community and with the FDA, to develop transformative treatments for patients with unmet medical needs while adhering to the highest standards to protect the health and safety of patients and the public.”

To help people make informed decisions we have created an infographic and video that detail the information people need to know, and the questions they should ask, before they agree to participate in a clinical trial or get a stem cell therapy.

 

 

‘Ask The Expert’ on Facebook Live about the power of stem cells to reverse damage caused by a stroke.

facebook-live-brand-awarenessIt’s not often you get a chance to ask a world class stem cell expert a question about their work, and how it might help you or someone you love. But on Thursday, May 31 you can do just that.

CIRM is hosting a special ‘Ask the Expert’ event on Facebook Live. The topic is Strokes and Stem Cells. Just head over to our Facebook Page on May 31st from noon till 1pm PST to experience it live. You can also re-watch the event any time after the broadcast has ended from our Facebook videos page.

Steinberg

We will be joined by Dr. Gary Steinberg, chair of neurosurgery at Stanford University, who will talk to us about his work in helping reverse the damage caused by a stroke, even for people who experienced a brain attack several years ago.

CIRM Senior Science Officer, Dr. Lila Collins, will talk about other stem cell research targeting stroke, its promise and some of the problems that still need to be overcome.

You will have a chance to ask questions of both our experts, either live on the day or by sending us questions in advance at info@cirm.ca.gov.

We’ll post reminders on Facebook so make sure to follow us. But for now, mark the date and time on your diary and please feel free to share this information with anyone you think might be interested.

It promises to be a fascinating event.

 

 

Stem Cell Agency’s supporting role in advancing research for rare diseases

Orchard

The recent agreement transferring GSK’s rare disease gene therapies to Orchard Therapeutics was good news for both companies and for the patients who are hoping this research could lead to new treatments, even cures, for some rare diseases. It was also good news for CIRM, which played a key role in helping Orchard grow to the point where this deal was possible.

In a news releaseMaria Millan, CIRM’s President & CEO, said:

“At CIRM, our value proposition is centered around our ability to advance the field of regenerative medicine in many different ways. Our funding and partnership has enabled the smooth transfer of Dr. Kohn’s technology from the academic to the industry setting while conducting this important pivotal clinical trial. With our help, Orchard was able to attract more outside investment and now it is able to grow its pipeline utilizing this platform gene therapy approach.”

Under the deal, GSK not only transfers its rare disease gene therapy portfolio to Orchard, it also becomes a shareholder in the company with a 19.9 percent equity stake. GSK is also eligible to receive royalties and commercial milestone payments. This agreement is both a recognition of Orchard’s expertise in this area, and the financial potential of developing treatments for rare conditions.

Dr. Millan says it’s further proof that the agency’s impact on the field of regenerative medicine extends far beyond the funding it offers companies like Orchard.

“Accelerating stem cell therapies to patients with unmet medical needs involves a lot more than just funding research; it involves supporting the research at every stage and creating partnerships to help it fulfill its potential. We invest when others are not ready to take a chance on a promising but early stage project. That early support not only helps the scientists get the data they need to show their work has potential, but it also takes some of the risk out of investments by venture capitalists or larger pharmaceutical companies.”

CIRM’s early support helped UCLA’s Don Kohn, MD, develop a stem cell therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This therapy is now Orchard’s lead program in ADA-SCID, OTL-101.

Sohel Talib, CIRM’s Associate Director Therapeutics and Industry Alliance, says this approach has transformed the lives of dozens of children born with this usually fatal immune disorder.

“This gene correction approach for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has already transformed the lives of dozens of children treated in early trials and CIRM is pleased to be a partner on the confirmatory trial for this transformative treatment for patients born with this fatal immune disorder.”

Dr. Donald B. Kohn UCLA MIMG BSCRC Faculty 180118Dr. Kohn, now a member of Orchard’s scientific advisory board, said:

“CIRM funding has been essential to the overall success of my work, supporting me in navigating the complex regulatory steps of drug development, including interactions with FDA and toxicology studies that enhanced and helped drive the ADA-SCID clinical trial.”

CIRM funding has allowed Orchard Therapeutics to expand its technical operations footprint in California, which now includes facilities in Foster City and Menlo Park, bringing new jobs and generating taxes for the state and local community.

Mark Rothera, Orchard’s President and CEO, commented:

“The partnership with CIRM has been an important catalyst in the continued growth of Orchard Therapeutics as a leading company transforming the lives of patients with rare diseases through innovative gene therapies. The funding and advice from CIRM allowed Orchard to accelerate the development of OTL-101 and to build a manufacturing platform to support our development pipeline which includes 5 clinical and additional preclinical programs for potentially transformative gene therapies”.

Since CIRM was created by the voters of California the Agency has been able to use its support for research to leverage an additional $1.9 billion in funds for California. That money comes in the form of co-funding from companies to support their own projects, partnerships between outside investors or industry groups with CIRM-funded companies to help advance research, and additional funding that companies are able to attract to a project because of CIRM funding.

New CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic offers HOPE for boys with deadly disease

UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures

For people battling Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a rare and fatal genetic disorder that slowly destroys muscles, hope has often been in short supply. There is no cure and treatments are limited. But now a new clinical trial at the site of one of the newest CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Network members could change that.

The HOPE-2 clinical trial has treated its first patient at UC Davis Medical Center, inaugurating the institution’s Alpha Stem Cell Clinic. The clinic is part of a CIRM-created network of top California medical centers that specialize in delivering stem cell clinical trials to patients. The key to the Network’s success is the ability to accelerate the delivery of treatments to patients through partnerships with patients, medical providers and clinical trial sponsors.

UC Davis is one of five medical centers that now make up the network (the others are UC San Francisco, UCLA/UC Irvine, UC San Diego and City of Hope).

Jan NoltaIn a news release, Jan Nolta, the director of the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures, says the UC Davis Alpha Clinic is well equipped to move promising therapies out of the lab and into clinical trials and people.

“We have the full range of resource experts in regenerative medicine, from the cellular to the clinical trials level. We’re also excited about the prospect of being able to link with other Alpha Stem Cell Clinics around the state to help speed the process of testing and refining treatments so we can get therapies to patients in need.”

The news of this first patient is a cause for double celebration at CIRM. The trial is run by Capricor and CIRM funded the first phase of this work. You can read the story of Caleb Sizemore, who took part in that trial or watch this video of him talking about his fight.

When the CIRM Board approved funding for the UC Davis Alpha Clinic in October of 2017, Abla Creasey, CIRM’s Vice President for Therapeutics and Strategic Infrastructure, said:

“The Alpha Clinics are a one-of-a-kind network that gives patients access to the highest quality stem cell trials for a breadth of diseases including cancer, diabetes, heart disease and spinal cord injury. Expanding our network will allow more patients to participate in stem cell trials and will advance the development of stem cell treatments that could help or possibly cure patients.”

The UC Davis Alpha Clinic provides a one-stop shop for delivering stem cell therapies, gene therapies and immunotherapies, as well as conducting follow-up visits. It’s this type of CIRM-funded infrastructure that helps steer potential clinical trial participants away from illegitimate, unproven and potentially harmful fee-for-service stem cell treatments.

The DMD trial is the first of what we are confident will be many high-quality trials at the Clinic, bringing promising stem cell therapies to patients with unmet medical needs.

 

Therapies Targeting Cancer, Deadly Immune Disorder and Life-Threatening Blood Condition Get Almost $32 Million Boost from CIRM Board

An innovative therapy that uses a patient’s own immune system to attack cancer stem cells is one of three new clinical trials approved for funding by CIRM’s Governing Board.

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine were awarded $11.9 million to test their Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cell Therapy in patients with B cell leukemias who have relapsed or are not responding after standard treatments, such as chemotherapy.CDR774647-750Researchers take a patient’s own T cells (a type of immune cell) and genetically re-engineer them to recognize two target proteins on the surface of cancer cells, triggering their destruction. In addition, some of the T cells will form memory stem cells that will survive for years and continue to survey the body, killing any new or surviving cancer cells.

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Maria T. Millan

“When a patient is told that their cancer has returned it can be devastating news,” says Maria T. Millan, MD, President & CEO of CIRM. “CAR T cell therapy is an exciting and promising new approach that offers us a way to help patients fight back against a relapse, using their own cells to target and destroy the cancer.”

 

 

Sangamo-logoThe CIRM Board also approved $8 million for Sangamo Therapeutics, Inc. to test a new therapy for beta-thalassemia, a severe form of anemia (lack of healthy red blood cells) caused by mutations in the beta hemoglobin gene. Patients with this genetic disorder require frequent blood transfusions for survival and have a life expectancy of only 30-50 years. The Sangamo team will take a patient’s own blood stem cells and, using a gene-editing technology called zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), turn on a different hemoglobin gene (gamma hemoglobin) that can functionally substitute for the mutant gene. The modified blood stem cells will be given back to the patient, where they will give rise to functional red blood cells, and potentially eliminate the need for chronic transfusions and its associated complications.

UCSFvs1_bl_a_master_brand@2xThe third clinical trial approved is a $12 million grant to UC San Francisco for a treatment to restore the defective immune system of children born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a genetic blood disorder in which even a mild infection can be fatal. This condition is also called “bubble baby disease” because in the past children were kept inside sterile plastic bubbles to protect them from infection. This trial will focus on SCID patients who have mutations in a gene called Artemis, the most difficult form of SCID to treat using a standard bone marrow transplant from a healthy donor. The team will genetically modify the patient’s own blood stem cells with a functional copy of Artemis, with the goal of creating a functional immune system.

CIRM has funded two other clinical trials targeting different approaches to different forms of SCID. In one, carried out by UCLA and Orchard Therapeutics, 50 children have been treated and all 50 are considered functionally cured.

This brings the number of clinical trials funded by CIRM to 48, 42 of which are active. There are 11 other projects in the clinical trial stage where CIRM funded the early stage research.

CIRM President/CEO Presenting at Vatican Conference Targeting Cures for Deadly Diseases

It’s not often you get invited to a meeting of some of the leading scientists, ethicists, philosophers and faith leaders in the world so when the call comes in it’s an easy one to answer. Particularly when the call is from the Vatican.

View of Basilica di San Pietro in Vatican, Rome, Italy

Maria T. Millan, MD, President and CEO of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), will be part of a panel discussion at the Fourth International Vatican Conference at Vatican City, Rome. The conference, titled: Unite To Cure: How Science, Technology and 21st Century Medicine Will Impact Culture and Society, runs from April 26-28 in Rome.

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Maria T. Millan, MD

“It is a tremendous honor to be part of this historic event,” says Dr. Millan. “CIRM funds the science and development of transformative cell and gene therapies for patients with unmet medical needs so it will be important to be part of the global conversation during such a propitious time in the history of medicine.”

“We’re thrilled to bring together the world’s best scientists, doctors, ethicists and leaders of faith, business, government and philanthropy to this extraordinary global event at The Vatican,” says Dr. Robin Smith, President of The Cura Foundation, the event organizer in partnership with the Vatican. “It’s a Davos for health care, and over the course of three days we will rally the world around a very simple idea — that tomorrow’s cures are just around the corner, and by uniting together and understanding the challenges that lie ahead, we can speed the delivery of cures and foster great hope for patients all over the world suffering from deadly diseases and dangerous medical conditions.”

Dr. Millan will be part of a panel discussion titled, Public Private Partnerships to Accelerate Discoveries. The panel will be moderated by award-winning medical journalist Max Gomez, PhD., and will include David Mazzo, PhD, CEO of Caladrius Biosciences, and David Pearce, PhD, the Executive VP for Research at Sanford Health.

The topic for this panel is particularly well suited for CIRM, an agency that is devoted to accelerating stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs. CIRM has funded over 800 projects and over 45 novel stem cell and regenerative medicine clinical trials. It delivers a predictable and expedited funding mechanism, an active partnership and advisory role, strategic infrastructure, involvement of key opinion leaders and patient representatives and an industry alliance program, all to increase the chances of success for its programs and for the patients who would benefit.

To learn more about Unite To Cure: The Fourth International Vatican Conference, please visit: http://vaticanconference2018.com. Or, you can follow the event on Twitter @CuraFdn and on Facebook at facebook.com/TheCuraFoundation, and join the conversation with #UnitetoCure.

Patients at the heart of Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Symposium

I have been to a lot of stem cell conferences over the years and there’s one recent trend I really like: the growing importance and frequency of the role played by patient advocates.

There was a time, not so long ago, when having a patient advocate speak at a scientific conference was almost considered a novelty. But more and more it’s being seen for what it is, an essential item on the agenda. After all, they are the reason everyone at that conference is working. It’s all about the patients.

That message was front and center at the 3rd Annual CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network Symposium at UCLA last week. The theme of the symposium was the Delivery of Stem Cell Therapeutics to Patients. There were several fascinating scientific presentations, highlighting the progress being made in stem cell research, but it was the voices of the patient advocates that were loudest and most powerful.

First a little background. The CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network consists of six major medical centers – UCLA/UC Irvine (joint hosts of this conference), UC San Diego, City of Hope, UC San Francisco and UC Davis. The Network was established with the goal of accelerating the development and delivery of high-quality stem cell clinical trials to patients. This meeting brought together clinical investigators, scientists, patients, patient advocates, and the public in a thoughtful discussion on how novel stem cell therapies are now a reality.

It was definitely thoughtful. Gianna McMillan, the Co-Founder and Executive Director of “We Can, Pediatric Brain Tumor Network” set the tone with her talk titled, “Tell Me What I Need to Know”. At age 5 her son was diagnosed with a brain tumor, sending her life into a tailspin. The lessons she learned from that experience – happily her son is now a healthy young man – drive her determination to help others cope with similar situations.

Calling herself an “in the trenches patient advocate champion” she says:

“In the old days doctors made decisions on behalf of the patients who meekly and gratefully did what they were told. It’s very different today. Patients are better informed and want to be partners in the treatment they get. But yet this is not an equal partnership, because subjects (patients) are always at a disadvantage.”

She said patients often don’t speak the language of the disease or understand the scientific jargon doctors use when they talk about it. At the same time patients are wrestling with overwhelming emotions such as fear and anxiety because their lives have been completely overturned.

Yet she says a meaningful partnership is possible as long as doctors keep three basic questions in mind when dealing with people who are getting a new diagnosis of a life-threatening or life-changing condition:

  • Tell me what I need to know
  • Tell me in language I can understand
  • Tell me again and again

It’s a simple formula, but one that is so important that it needs to be stated over and over again. “Tell me again. And again. And again.”

David Mitchell, the President and Founder of Patients for Affordable Drugs, tackled another aspect of the patient experience: the price of therapies. He posed the question “What good is a therapy if no one can afford it?”

David’s organization focuses on changing policy at the state and federal level to lower the price of prescription drugs. He pointed out that many other countries charge lower prices for drugs than the US, in part because those countries’ governments negotiate directly with drug companies on pricing.

He says if we want to make changes in this country that benefit patients then patient have to become actively involved in lobbying their government, at both the state and local level, for more balanced prices, and in supporting candidates for public office who support real change in drug-pricing policy.

It’s encouraging to see that just as the field of stem cell research is advancing so too is the prominence of the patient’s voice. The CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network is pushing the field forward in exciting ways, and the patients are becoming an increasingly important, and vital part of that. And that is as it should be.