Breast Cancer Tumors Recruit Immune Cells to the Dark Side

We rely on our immune system to stave off all classes of disease—but what happens when the very system responsible for keeping us healthy turns to the dark side? In new research published today, scientists uncover new evidence that reveals how breast cancer tumors can actually recruit immune cells to spur the spread of disease.

Some forms of breast cancer tumors can actually turn the body's own immune system against itself.

Some forms of breast cancer tumors can actually turn the body’s own immune system against itself.

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, and if caught early, is highly treatable. In fact, the majority of deaths from breast cancer occur because the disease has been caught too late, having already spread to other parts of the body, a process called ‘metastasis.’ Recently, scientists discovered that women who have a heightened number of a particular type of immune cells, called ‘neutrophils,’ in their blood stream have a higher chance of their breast cancer metastasizing to other tissues. But they couldn’t figure out why.

Enter Karin de Visser, and her team at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, who announce today in the journal Nature the precise link between neutrophil immune cells and breast cancer metastasis.

They found that some types of breast tumors are particularly nefarious, sending out signals to the person’s immune system to speed up their production of neutrophils. And then they instruct these newly activated neutrophils to go rogue.

Rather than attack the tumor, these neutrophils turn on the immune system. They especially focus their efforts at blocking T cells—the type of immune cells whose job is normally to target and attack cancer cells. Further examination in mouse models of breast cancer revealed a particular protein, called interleukin 17 (or IL17) played a key role in this process. As Visser explained in today’s news release:

“We saw in our experiments that IL17 is crucial for the increased production of neutrophils. And not only that, it turns out that this is also the molecule that changes the behavior of the neutrophils, causing them to become T cell inhibitory.”

The solution then, was clear: block the connection, or pathway, between IL17 and neutrophils, and you can thwart the tumor’s efforts. And when Visser and her team, including first author and postdoctoral researcher Seth Coffelt, did this they saw a significant improvement. When the IL17-neutrophil pathway was blocked in the mouse models, the tumors failed to spread at the same rate.

“What’s notable is that blocking the IL17-neutrophil route prevented the development of metastases, but did not affect the primary tumor,” Visser added. “So this could be a promising strategy to prevent the tumor from spreading.”

The researchers are cautious about focusing their efforts on blocking neutrophils, however, as these cells are in and of themselves important to stave off infections. A breast cancer patient with neutrophil levels that were too low would be at risk for developing a whole host of infections from dangerous pathogens. As such, the research team argues that focusing on ways to block IL17 is the best option.

Just last month, the FDA approved an anti-IL17 based therapy to treat psoriasis. This therapy, or others like it, could be harnessed to treat aggressive breast cancers. Says Visser:

“It would be very interesting to investigate whether these already existing drugs are beneficial for breast cancer patients. It may be possible to turn these traitors of the immune system back towards the good side and prevent their ability to promote breast cancer metastasis.”

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