Tracking and mapping the health of damaged organs

Tissue engineering

Medical treatments for a variety of diseases have advanced dramatically in recent decades, but sometimes they come with a cost; namely damage to surrounding tissues and organs. That’s where stem cell research and regenerative medicine come in. Those fields seek to develop new ways of repairing the damage. But how do you see if those repairs are working? Researchers at Purdue say they have found a way to do just that.

The researchers have developed a 3D technology that allows them to track, map and monitor what happens with cells and tissues that are being used to repair damage caused by disease or the treatment for the disease. By observing the cells and tissues they can see if they are staying where they are needed and if they are working.

The technology, published in the journal ACS Nano, uses tiny sensors placed on a flexible scaffold to monitor the new materials in the body. Ingeniously the scaffold is buoyant, so it can float and survive in the wet conditions found in many parts of the body.

In a news release, Chi Hwan Lee, the leader of the research team, says the device could help millions of people:

“Tissue engineering already provides new hope for hard-to-treat disorders, and our technology brings even more possibilities. This device offers an expanded set of potential options to monitor cell and tissue function after surgical transplants in diseased or damaged bodies. Our technology offers diverse options for sensing and works in moist internal body environments that are typically unfavorable for electronic instruments.”

Purdue created this video showing the device and explaining how it works.

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