New study points to potential treatment for balance disorders

Alan Cheng and his colleagues were able to regenerate hair cells inside the ears of mice — a first in mature mammals. Photo Courtesy of Steve Fisch

A sense of balance is important for a wide range of activities, from simple ones such as walking, running, and driving, to more intricate ones such as dancing, rock climbing, and tight-rope walking. A lack of physical balance in the body can lead to an inbalance in trying to live a normal everyday life.

One primary cause of balance disorders is a problem with hair cells located inside the inner ear, which play a role in maintaining balance, spatial orientation, and regulating eye movement. Damage to these cells can occur as a result from infections, genetic disorders, or aging. Unfortunately, in humans, hair cells in the inner ear regenerate on their own very minimally. In the United States alone, 69 million people experience balance disorders. Symptoms of this disorder include a “spinning” feeling, lack of balance, nausea, and difficulty tracking objects using the eyes.

However, a CIRM funded study has showed promising results for helping treat this disorder. Researchers at Stanford University have discovered a way to regenerate hair cells in the inner ear of mice, giving them a better sense of balance. To do this, the researchers impaired the hair cells in the inner ear of mice and measured how well they regenerated on their own to obtain a baseline measurement. They found that about a third of the cells regenerated on their own.

Next, the researchers manipulated Atoh1, a transcription factor that regulates hair cell formation in mice. By overexpressing Atoh1, the researchers found that as much as 70% of hair cells regenerated in the mice. Additionally, 70% of these mice also recovered their sense of balance. This simple proof of concept could potentially be applied in humans to treat similar disorders related to the loss of hair cells in the inner ear.

In a press release, Dr. Alan Cheng, senior author of this study, is quoted as saying,

“This is very exciting. It’s an important first step to find treatment for vestibular disorders. We couldn’t get sufficient regeneration to recover function before.”

The complete results of this study were published in Cell Reports.

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