Investing in student researchers now for future stem cell therapy homeruns

Even though my San Francisco Giants didn’t make it to the World Series this year, I still watched Game 1 two nights ago between the Cleveland Indians and the Chicago Cubs. As each batter stepped up to the plate for their first at bat, I thought about all the years of training and in-game experience it must have required for each athlete to reach this pinnacle of their profession. That training certainly relied on mentoring from great coaches and early financial support in the form of athletic scholarships, etc. Without that help, you could argue that the number of young, high-caliber baseball players would dwindle over the generations and the sport eventually would lose relevance.

eliana_lab

The CIRM Bridges Program: training the next generation of all-star stem cell researchers, like Eliana Ochoa-Bolton (pictured here)

I think the same can be said for stem cell research. The field is currently chock-full of veteran, superstar scientists who are leading the charge of bringing first-of-their-kind stem cell treatments to clinical trials (for example, check out Monday’s exciting blog). But the field is still in its infancy and will require a well-trained workforce of scientists, physicians and technicians throughout the 21st century and beyond to fully realize and implement the potential of stem cells to treat patients with unmet medical needs. But cuts in federal funding for research mean this is a particularly challenging time to get started on a scientific career, especially for economically disadvantaged students.

That’s where the Bridges to Stem Cell Research and Therapy Awards Program comes into the picture. Started in 2009, the program provides paid stem cell research internships to students at universities and colleges that don’t have major stem cell research programs. Each Bridges internship includes thorough hands-on training and education in stem cell research, and direct patient engagement and outreach activities that engage California’s diverse communities.

Earlier this year, the CIRM governing Board re-upped on their investment in the Bridges Program to the tune of $40 million. Each of the fourteen awarded schools will have enough funding to support up to ten trainees per year for up to five years. The program has become a source of pride for the CIRM team as well as for each campus. Case in point, this past Wednesday the news center at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) featured a story about the school’s new $2.77 million Bridges grant. Professor Cindy Malone, CSUN’s Bridges Program Director, looked back at the accomplishments from their previous round of funding which began in 2009:

malone-cindy2-287x300

Cindy Malone
CSUN biology professor

“When we first launched the [CSUN-UCLA Bridges to Stem Cell Research Program], we didn’t know how successful it would become. Our students are taking part in cutting-edge research alongside some of the greatest minds in stem cell research. They are presenting papers at some of the top professional conferences in the world. When they graduate, they are highly sought after by the top medical and graduate schools in the country, and rightly so.”

eliana

Eliana Ochoa-Bolton

One of those students is Eliana Ochoa-Bolton who spent much of her senior year at CSUN as a Bridges intern in the laboratory of Samantha Butler at UCLA. There, she contributed to the lab’s efforts to better understand the nerve signals that become damaged in spinal cord injury with the hope of eventually restoring them. Ochoa-Bolton, who is now a CSUN master’s student in biology and aspires to earn a doctorate, is very grateful for her Bridges experience: “It was such an amazing opportunity. I got to do work I didn’t think possible as an undergraduate.”

Now embarking on the second round of Bridges funding, Malone mapped out the plan for the program’s next five years:

“We will continue to partner with UCLA as our internship-host institution. There, our students will perform 10 months of intensive stem cell research. New research training courses will be launched in the next year to prepare our undergraduates for the new Stem Cell Scientist Training Program and for the increasingly technical job market in California.”

For us CIRM team members and the CIRM governing Board, the Bridges program and its high school counterpart, the CIRM Spark program, continue to be among our favorite awards because we’re continually amazed how much the student’s learn and we’re inspired by their unbounded enthusiasm for stem cell research.

It makes me very optimistic that these students are destined to hit some future stem cell treatments home runs.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Investing in student researchers now for future stem cell therapy homeruns

  1. Hello, this is parya valizadeh i am studying pharmacy in north cyprus, this is my 11th semester of pharm D my thesis was about therapeutic application of stem cells do you have some specific requirements for taking the trainees in this field? Hiw can i join this group for getting experience?
    Thank you in advance.

    • Hi Parya, Thanks for reaching out to us. That’s great to hear about your interest in stem cell science.

      The Bridges training programs described in this blog story are only eligible to students currently enrolled in one of the 14 schools that were awarded a Bridges grant. (here is a a list of schools: http://bit.ly/1PDWemz). One alternate suggestion would be to browse through our database of CIRM-funded projects and directly contact labs that interest you about possible training opportunities: https://www.cirm.ca.gov/grants

      Best wishes!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s