Bringing out the Big Guns: Scientists Weigh in on How Best to Combat Deadly Diseases of the Brain

Despite our best efforts, diseases of the brain are on the rise. Neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases threaten not only to devastate our aging population, but also cripple our economy. Meanwhile, the causes of conditions such as autism remain largely unknown. And brain and spinal cord injuries continue to increase—leaving their victims with precious few options for improving their condition.

This special review issue of addresses some of the key challenges for translational neuroscience and the path from bench to beside. [Credit: Cell Press]

This special review issue of Neuron addresses some of the key challenges for translational neuroscience and the path from bench to beside. [Credit: Cell Press]

We need to do better.

The scientific community agrees. And in a special issue of the journal Neuron, the field’s leading researchers lay out how to accelerate much-needed therapies to the many millions who will be affected by brain disease or injury in the coming years.

The journal’s leadership argues that now is the time to renew efforts in this field. Especially worrying, say experts, is the difficulty in translating research breakthroughs into therapies.

But Neuron Editor Katja Brose is optimistic that the answers are out there—we just need to bring them to light:

“There is resounding agreement that we need new approaches and strategies, and there are active efforts, discussion and experimentation aimed at making the process of therapeutic development more efficient and effective.”

Below are three papers highlighted in the special journal, each giving an honest assessment of how far we’ve come, and what we need to do to take the next step.

Fast-tracking Drug Development. In this perspective, authors from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Salk Institute—including CIRM grantee Fred Gage—discuss the main takeaways from an IOM-sponsored workshop aimed at finding new avenues for accelerating treatments for brain diseases to the clinic.

The main conclusion, according to the review’s lead author Steve Hyman, is a crucial cultural shift—various stakeholders in academia, government and industry must stop thinking of themselves as competitors, but instead as allies. Only then will the field be able to successfully shepherd a breakthrough from the lab bench and to the patient’s bedside.

Downsized Divisions’ Dangerous Effects. Next, an international team of neuroscientists focuses their perspective on the recent trend of pharmaceutical companies to cut back on funding for neuroscience research. The reasoning: neurological diseases are far more difficult than other conditions, and proving to be too costly and too time-consuming to be worth continued effort.

The solution, says author Dennis Choi of State University of New York Stonybrook, is a fundamental policy change in the way that market returns of neurological disease drug development are regulated. But Choi argues that such a shift cannot be achieved without a concerted effort by patient advocates and nonprofits to lead the charge. As he explains:

“The broader neuroscience community and patient stakeholders should advocate for the crafting and implementation of these policy changes. Scientific and patient group activism has been successful in keeping the development of therapies in other areas—such as HIV and cancer—appropriately on track, but this type of sector-wide activism would be a novel step for the neuroscience community.”

Indeed, here at CIRM we have long helped support the patient community—a wonderful collection of individuals and organizations advocating for advances in stem cell research. We are humbled and honored that so many patients and patient advocates have stepped forward as stem cell champions as we move towards the clinic.

The Road to Preclinical Diagnosis. Finally, we hear from Harvard University neuroscientists highlighting how far the research has come—even in the face of such extraordinary difficulty.

Specifically focused on Alzheimer’s disease, the authors touch on the discoveries of protein markers, such as amyloid-beta and tau, that serve as an indicator of neurodegeneration. They make the important point that because Alzheimer’s is almost certainly is present before the onset of physical symptoms, the ultimate goal of researchers should be to find a way to diagnose the disease before it has progressed too far.

“[Here we] highlight the remarkable advances in our ability to detect evidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain, prior to clinical symptoms of the disease, and to predict those at greatest risk for cognitive decline,” explained lead author Reisa Sperling.

The common thread between these perspectives, say Neuron editors in an accompanying editorial, is that “by leveraging shared resources, tools and knowledge and approaching these difficult problems collaboratively, we can achieve more together.”

A sentiment that we at CIRM fully support—and one that we will continue to foster as we push forward with our mission to accelerate stem cell-based therapies to patients in need.

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