Unfolding Collaboration: New EuroStemCell video about promoting public engagement around stem cells

What does origami have to do with stem cells? Scientists at EuroStemCell, which is a partnership of more than 400 stem cell labs across Europe, are using origami and other creative activities to engage and educate the public about stem cells.

EuroStemCell’s goal is to “make sense of stem cells” by providing “expert-reviewed information and road-tested educational resources on stem cells and their impact on society.” Their educational resource page is rich with science experiments for kids, students and even adults. They also have science videos on topics ranging from what stem cells are to bioengineering body parts.

Unfolding Organogenesis

Recently EuroStemCell posted a video about how successful public engagement activities are based on strong collaborations between scientists, doctors, educators and communicators. This video was particularly powerful because it showed how good ideas can start from an individual, but great ideas happen when individuals work together to develop these initial ideas into activities that will really connect with their audience.

The video features Dr. Cathy Southworth who begins by telling the story of how she and her collaborators developed an origami activity called “Unfolding Organogenesis”. Southworth explains her rationale behind using paper to simulate how stem cells develop the tissues and organs in our body.

“I was mulling how to use a prop or activity to talk about stem cells, and it suddenly came to me that paper and origami is a bit like the process. The whole idea of starting from a blank slate. Depending on the instructions you follow, makes a different object. If you start with a stem cell, you can make any type of cell you find in the body. And that made me think it was quite a nice analogy to talk to the public about.”

Her initial idea was made a reality when Southworth began working with science and math educators Karen Jent and Tung Ken Lam. Together the team developed an interactive activity where people used paper to build 3D hearts that can actually beat.

Ken Lam making organ origami.

Southworth said that as a science communicator, educating the public is the focus of her work. But she also believes that educating scientists on how to communicate with the public effectively is equally important.

“Part of my job is to make sure that the scientists feel confident in the activities that they are going to deliver, and also that they are having a good time as part of the engagement work.”

The video also touches on important science communications tips like teaching scientists the art of storytelling. Southworth emphasized that having scientists talk about their personal story of why they are pursuing their research adds a human component that is key to connecting with their audience. Karen Jent also added that it’s important to understand your audience and their needs,

“You always have to think about what kind of audience you’re addressing and bear in mind that people aren’t all the same kinds of learners.”

Where are my stem cells?

CIRM is also dedicated to educating the public about stem cells and the importance of stem cell research. We have our own educational resources on our website, but we love to use materials from other organizations like EuroStemCell in our public engagement activities.

One of our favorite public engagement events is the Bay Area Science Festival Discovery Day held at AT&T park. This event attracts over 50,000 people, mainly young kids and their parents who are excited to learn about science and technology. At our booth, we’ve done a few different activities to teach kids about stem cells. One activity, which is great for young kids, is using Play-Doh to model embryonic development.

Teaching kids about embryonic development with Play-Doh! Photo: Todd Dubnicoff/CIRM

Another fun activity, this one developed by EuroStemCell, that we added last year was called “Where are my stem cells?”. It’s a game that teaches people that stem cells aren’t just found in the developing embryo. You’re given laminated cutouts of human organs and tissues, which you’re asked to place on a white board that has an outline of your body. While you are doing this, you learn that there are different types of adult stem cells that live in these tissues and organs and are responsible for creating the cells that make up those structures.

Where are your stem cells? A fun activity designed by EuroStemCell. Photo: Todd Dubnicoff/CIRM

If you’re interested in doing public engagement activities around stem cell education, the resources mentioned in this blog are a great start. I’d also recommend checking out the Super Cells, Power of Stem Cells exhibit, which is touring Europe, USA and Canada. It’s a wonderful interactive exhibit that explains the concept of stem cells and how they can be used to understand and treat disease. It’s also a great example of a collaboration between stem cell organizations including CIRM, CCRM, EuroStemCell, Catapult Cell Therapy and the Stem Cell Network.

We got a chance to check out the Super Cells exhibit last year when it visited the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley. You can read more about it and see pictures in our blog.

Super Cells Exhibit. Photo: Todd Dubnicoff/CIRM

 

Stem Cell Roundup: Battle of the Biotech Bands, “Cells I See” Art Contest and Teaching Baseball Fans the Power of Stem Cells

This Friday’s stem cell roundup is dedicated to the playful side of stem cell science. Scientists are often stereotyped as lab recluses who honorably forgo social lives in the quest to make game-changing discoveries and advance cutting-edge research. But as a former bench scientist, I can attest that scientists are normal people too. They might have a nerdy, slightly neurotic side around their field of research, but they know how to enjoy life and have fun. So here are a few stories that caught our eye this week about scientists having a good time with science.

Rockin’ researchers battle for glory (Kevin McCormack)

Did you know that Bruce Springsteen got his big break after winning the Biotech Battle of the Bands (BBOB)? Probably not, I just made that up. But just because Bruce didn’t hit it big because of BBOB doesn’t mean you can’t.

BBOB is a fun chance for you and your labmates, or research partners, to cast off your lab coats, pick up a guitar, form a band, show off your musical chops, play before a live audience and raise money for charity.  This is the fourth year the event is being held. It’s part of Biotech Week Boston, on Wednesday, September 27th at the Royale Nightclub, Boston.

Biotech Week is a celebration of science and, duh, biotech; bringing together what the event organizers call “the most inventive scientific minds and business leaders in Boston and around the world.” And they wouldn’t lie would they, after all, they’re scientists.

If you want to check out the competition here’s some video from a previous year – see if you can spot the man with the cowbell!

“Cells I See” Stem Cell Art Contest

It’s that time again! The “Cells I See” art contest hosted by Canada’s Centre for Commercialization for Regenerative Medicine (CCRM) and The Stem Cell Network is now open for business. This is a super fun event that celebrates the beauty of stem cells and biomaterials that support regenerative medicine.

Not only is “Cells I See” a great way for scientists to share their research with the public, it’s also a way for them to tap into their artistic, creative side. Last year’s ­contestants submitted breathtaking microscope images, paintings and graphic designs of stem cells in action. The titles for these art submissions were playful. “Nucleic Shower” “The Quest for Innervation” and “Flat, Fluorescent & Fabulous” were some of my favorite title entries.

There are two prizes for this contest. The grand prize of $750 will be awarded to the submission with the highest number of votes from scientists attending the Till and McCulloch Stem Cell Meeting in November. There is also a “People’s Choice” prize of $500 given to the contestant who has the most numbers of likes on the CCRM Facebook page.

The deadline for “Cell I See” submissions is September 8th so you have plenty of time to get your creative juices flowing!

Iris

The 2016 Grand Prize and People’s Choice Winner, Sabiha Hacibekiroglu, won for her photo titled “Iris”.

Scientists Teach Baseball Fans the Power of Stem Cells

San Francisco Giants fans who attended Tuesday’s ball game were in for a special treat – a science treat that is. Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes partnered with the SF Giants to raise awareness about the power of stem cells for advancing research and developing cures for various diseases.

Gladstone PhD student Jessica Butts explains the Stem Cell Plinko game to a Giants fan.

The Gladstone team had a snazzy stem cell booth at the Giant’s Community Clubhouse with fun science swag and educational stem cell activities for fans of all ages. One of the activities was a game called “Stem Cell Plinko” where you drop a ball representing a pluripotent stem cell down a plinko board. The path the ball travels represents how that stem cell differentiates or matures into adult cells like those in the heart.

Gladstone also debuted their new animated stem cell video, which explains how “stem cell research has opened up promising avenues for personalized and regenerative medicine.”

Finally, Gladstone scientists challenged fans to participate in a social media contest about their newfound stem cell knowledge cells on Twitter. The winner of the contest, a woman named Nicole, will get an exclusive, behind-the-scenes lab tour at the Gladstone and “see firsthand how Gladstone is using stem cells to overcome disease.”

The Gladstone “Power of Stem Cells” event is a great example of how scientists are trying to make research and science more accessible to the public. It not only benefits people by educating them about the current state of stem cell research, but also is a fun way for scientists to engage with the local community.

“Participating in the SF Giants game was very fun,” said Megan McDevitt, vice president of communications at the Gladstone Institutes. “Our booth experienced heavy traffic all evening, giving us a wonderful opportunity to engage with the San Francisco community about science and, more specifically, stem cell research. We were delighted to see how interested fans were to learn more on the topic.”

And as if all that wasn’t enough, the Giants won, something that hasn’t been happening very much this season.

Go Giants. Go Gladstone.

Gladstone scientist dropping stem cell knowledge to Giants fans.

Discovering stem cells and science at Discovery Day

discoveryday

The CIRM booth at Discovery Day at AT&T Park

Someone stole my thigh bone. One minute it was there. The next, gone. I have narrowed down the list of suspects to the more than 25,000 people attending Discovery Day at San Francisco’s AT&T Park.

To be honest, the bone was just a laminated image of a bone, stuck to the image of a person drawn on a white board. We were using it, along with laminated images of a brain, liver, stomach and other organs and tissues, to show that there are many different kinds of stem cells in the body, and they all have different potential uses.

The white board and its body parts were gimmicks that we used to get kids to come up to the CIRM booth and ask what we were doing. Then, as they played with the images, and tried to guess which stem cells went where, we talked to their parents about stem cell research, and CIRM and the progress being made.

discoveryday-karen

Dr. Karen Ring explaining embryonic development to kids

We also used Play Doh so that the kids could model cell division and specialization during embryonic development. But mostly it was so the kids could play with the Play Doh while we talked to their parents.

It is shameless I know but when you are competing against more than 130 other booths for people’s attention – and some of these booths had live snakes, virtual reality devices, or they just let kids throw and hit things – you have to be creative.

And creativity was certainly the key word, because Discovery Day – part of the annual week-long Bay Area Science Fair – was filled with booths from companies and academic institutions promoting every imaginable aspect of science.

So why were we there? Well, first, education has been an important part of CIRM’s mission ever since we were created. Second, we’re a state agency that gets public funding so we feel we owe it to the public to explain how their money is being used. And third, it’s just a lot of fun.

NASA was there, talking about exploring deep space. And there were booths focused on exploring the oceans, and saving them from pollution and over-fishing. You could learn about mathematics and engineering by building wacky-looking paper airplanes that flew long distances, or you could just sit in the cockpit of a fighter jet.

discoveryday-victor

And everywhere you looked were families, with kids running up to the different booths to see what was there. All they needed was a little draw to get them to stick around for a few minutes, so you could talk to them and explain to them what stem cells are and why they are so amazing. Some of the kids were fascinated and wanted to know more: some just wanted to use the Play Doh;  at least one just wanted to eat the Play Doh, but fortunately we were able to stop that happening.

It was an amazing sight to see a baseball stadium filled with tens of thousands of people, all there to learn about science. At a time when we are told that kids don’t care about science, that they don’t like math, this was the perfect response. All you had to do was look around and see that kids were fascinated by science. They were hungry to learn how pouring carbon dioxide on a candle puts out the flame. They delighted in touching an otter pelt and feeling how silky smooth it is, and then looking at the pelt under a microscope to see just how extraordinarily dense the hairs are and how that helps waterproof the otter.

And so yes, we used Play Doh and a white board person to lure the kids to us. But it worked.

There was another booth where they had a couple of the San Francisco 49er’s cheerleaders in full uniform. I don’t actually know what that had to do with teaching science but it was very popular with some of the men. Maybe next year I could try dressing up like that. It would certainly draw a crowd.


Check us out on Instagram to learn more about CIRM’s educational outreach efforts.

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We had a lot of fun this weekend teaching young minds about what stem cells are and where they are located in the human body at the @bayareascience #DiscoveryDay festival. We had one activity where kids learned about embryonic stem cells and development using playdoh and another white board activity about adult stem cells. Students learned that each organ has its own set of adult stem cells that can regenerate lost or damaged cells in that specific organ. It was really fun to explain to kids and their parents why stem cells and regenerative medicine research are important. • • • #BASF2016 #stemcells #stemcellresearch #stemeducation #STEM #teaching #education #research #attpark #CIRM #development #embryonicstemcells

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Glimpse the future at a fun-filled Festival of Science

Hands-on science and fun

Hands-on science and fun

Imagine a giant circus but instead of performing animals you have a Robot Zoo; instead of scary clowns you have colorful chemicals in glass beakers. That’s what AT&T Park will look like this Saturday when the 5th Annual Discovery Day opens its doors.  It’s a hands-on, eye-opening, brain-engaging celebration of science for everyone.

It’s a lot of fun

You’ll get a chance to learn about the science of sports – an appropriate subject as you’ll be doing it at the home of the 3-time World Champions of baseball, the San Francisco Giants. You’ll also be able to experience some of the training it takes to become an astronaut, without any of that pesky going-into-space business.

All in all you’ll be able to visit more than 150 hands-on exhibits and activities spread throughout the park, put together by the top science organizations, institutions and companies from all over the Bay Area. We’re talking Stanford University, UCSF, The Tech Museum, the Exploratorium, KQED, US Geological Society and the list goes on and on.

Meet the future right now

Today's scientists inspiring tomorrow's

Today’s scientists inspiring tomorrow’s

You’ll get to meet the scientists who are exploring outer space and the depths of the ocean, who are doing cutting edge research into health and who are pushing the boundaries of scientific knowledge.

And you will get a chance to meet us, the CIRM Team. We’re going to be there all day talking about the exciting progress being made in the field of stem cell research, and about the 15 clinical trials we are currently funding in heart disease, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS and blindness (to name just a few).

You can find us on the Promenade level at booth P50. We’re easy to spot. We’re the coolest ones around. And if you have kids who enjoy PlayDoh, we will give them a chance to use the fun stuff to make stem cells.

But best of all Discovery Day is a chance for kids to learn how amazing science can be, to meet the scientists who are helping shape their future, and to consider a future as scientists themselves. And for the rest of us, it’s a chance to remind ourselves why we fell in love with science to start with.

And as if that wasn’t enough, the whole shebang is FREE.

The event is this Saturday, November 7 from 10am – 4pm. For details on where it is and how to get there – go to Discovery Day

Fun on the field at AT&T Park

Fun on the field at AT&T Park