Women in Bio on The Influential Paths of Great Visionary Leaders

Powerful women made powerful statements last week at the Women in Bio (WIB) Plenary Event during the 2016 BIO International Convention. A panel of influential women leaders discussed difficult yet critical topics, such as how to brand yourself as a woman in a male-dominated industry, the importance of side hustles, and how to close the gender gap. It was a dynamic and inspiring event that engaged both men and women in the audience in productive conversation about how we can all work together to support women in the life sciences industry.

The panel was moderated by Nicole Fisher, the Founder and CEO of HHR Strategies and Forbes Contributer, and the speakers included Renee Compton Ryan, VP of Venture Investments at Johnson & Johnson and Frances Colón, Deputy Science and Technology Adviser to Secretary of State John Kerry.

Frances Colon, Renee Ryan, Nicole Fisher.

Frances Colon, Renee Ryan, Nicole Fisher.

The panel was more of a fire-side chat with the three woman talking intimately at a small coffee table, first sharing stories about their career paths and the road blocks along the way, and then delving into the controversial topics that women in the life sciences face.

Career Paths of Influential Women

Nicole told her story about how she got into the healthcare space. She started by ghostwriting about healthcare, innovation, and politics for the Congressional Budget Office director. Her passion turned into an opportunity with Forbes where she now runs the Health Innovation and Policy page and eventually into her company HHR Strategies which focuses on healthcare and human rights.

Renee discussed how she started as an investment banker in healthcare and made an investment in a company that benefitted patients. This experience made her want to be a part of the solution for patients, which she described as “a calling we are all fortunate to have,” and ultimately brought her to her current position at J&J.

After completing a Ph.D. in developmental neurobiology, Frances switched gears and found her strengths and assets in science policy and communications. She wanted to bring science into international affairs and shared that her mission now is to “make science cool to political scientists and diplomats to the point where my job becomes irrelevant.”

Other Panel Highlights

Branding

Renee’s advice on branding was, “challenge yourself to know your brand, and revisit your brand”. Everyone builds a resume chronologically, but she forces herself to revisit her resume every two years. Her trick is to flip the resume over to the blank side and list all her skills but do it through a different lens so you can have perspective. This process helps her decide where she wants to grow and learn.

Having Side Hustles

Frances mentioned the importance of having “side hustles”. These are things that you are really passionate about that will also build on your strengths, raise your visibility and help you take your brand to the next level. She mentioned two side hustles in particular, a non-profit she founded that supports the Puerto Rican Diaspora Network and a group she organized called the Science Technology Table, which brings together government and the private sector to discuss trending topics in science, tech and innovation. Nicole chimed in and said that all three of her side hustles have turned into companies or big opportunities that have significantly advanced her career.

Closing the Gender Gap, No More Manels!

The panelists had much to say about closing the gender gap. Renee encouraged women in high-up positions to mentor other women that show promise and to be a hands-on mentor. She also said that everyone in the biotech and pharma industries should be studying the data to see why there are less women in the life sciences and what can be done about it.

Frances said that the gender policies at companies need to change, and that people at companies have to hold each other accountable and have the conversations that can create change. One of her key points that got a laugh from the crowd was getting rid of “manels”, or all men panels, which are prevalent at major conferences in the biotech and healthcare space. She also spoke about how we need to strive for 50/50 representation on boards and executive management.

What the audience had to say

The panel was a hit with the Women in Bio audience. Dr. Leah Makley, a WIB member and Founder and CSO of ViewPoint Therapeutics, had this to say about the event,

Leah Makley

Leah Makley

“The panelists shared candid wisdom from their own career trajectories, passions, and ‘side hustles’ that far surpassed the typical depth of career panels.  Moreover, I thought Nicole Fisher did an exceptional job of framing the conversation and asking provocative questions.”

She also spoke about the importance of the WIB community and the resources they offer:

“WIB is a supportive community of powerful, inspiring women. Both the members and the events tend to be action- and solution-oriented, and I’ve walked away from each event I’ve attended with new insights, perspectives, and energy. I’m so grateful that this resource exists.”

Marco Chacon

Marco Chacon

A moment that really stood out in my mind was a moving speech by Marco Chacon, Founder of Paragon Bioservices, and a WIB sponsor. Marco shared that he recently attended a meeting in Boston and listened in on a few diversity forums. He was appalled to hear the statistics on gender diversity in the executive suite and boards of directors in biotech and pharma. Passionately he said, “This has got to change, and to the degree that I can affect this in some way, I can assure you I will do so.”

Final Thoughts

Influential leaders like Nicole, Renee, Frances, and Marco and organizations like Women in Bio, are laying the groundwork for the career advancement of women in science. This event was a great reminder that the issues facing women in the life sciences industry can be addressed in the immediate future if we continue the conversation and challenge one another to create change.

Patient advocates a small but mighty force at BIO meeting

Patient Advocacy Pavilion at BIO2016

Patient Advocacy Pavilion at BIO2016

A few hundred patient advocates operating from a small sub-section carved out of three cavernous exhibit halls could easily get lost amid the 16,000 scientists and business folks attending the BIO International meeting in San Francisco last week. But their voice was heard as they made great use of the meeting to remind companies developing therapies that they are the end user. They are the reason why the companies exist.

Talking to many advocates representing their constituents from the tiny two-foot by one-foot shelves and a stool they were each given within the advocate zone a couple of consensus points came through. The meeting provided incredibly valuable contacts for the patient advocates, and the attitudes of the companies are changing.

 “We want to make people aware that family caregivers are making care decisions,” said Mark Gibbons of the Caregiver Action Network. “It has been wonderful having companies reach out to us rather than us making cold calls on them.”

Bill Remak of the California Chronic Care Coalition had similar thoughts on the changing attitude, but on a different aspect of the patient-company interface:

 “This has been a very good meeting; we made really good contacts and had great discussions on business models, pricing and making products accessible to patients. The mentality is changing to more concern on patient access.”

We had a lengthy discussion with Sean Elkins, chief science officer, and Allison Moore, CEO, of the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation. They fight the battle to get therapies to their constituents on two fronts: The battle to get funding for the research as well as the added barrier of working with orphan diseases. They represent folks with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease and a half dozen related neurologic conditions. And while a prevalence of one in 2,500 makes it one of the more common orphan diseases, they have no treatments, and still have a hard time getting some company’s attention.

Allison Moore

Allison Moore and Sean Elkins

As a result, they initiate many research projects themselves with their own donor-derived funds and federal grants. In one effort they developed an assay for whether existing drug compounds could impact the nerves of patients with CMT. They have been testing many existing compounds and finding a few candidate therapies. But Elkins lamented on Twitter that he wished the drug companies would train their exhibit staff better about rare diseases. “When you approach some of them and say you have tested some of their products in an orphan disease they act like a deer in the headlights.”

His colleague, Moore, noted their efforts to take the bull by the horns and bring in the next generation of scientist/business people to tackle their diseases. “The highlight of the meeting for us has been meeting with former academics starting companies who are excited about the prospect of working on something new.”

Moore’s own story highlighted the dedication evident among the advocates at the meeting. She is a patient herself and not just a foundation executive. She worked the meeting so hard that by the third day she had bandages on both legs to cover the blisters from the braces that allow her to walk despite the underlying illness.

Everyone working the patient advocate zone at the meeting seemed pleased to have the chance to make connections that might one day make things a bit better for their constituents. This was the first time attending for the team from the California Chronic Care Coalition and the group’s CEO, Liz Helms, was exuberant in stating their time was well spent:

 “This meeting was over the top valuable; everything we expected and more.”

BIO 2016: IMAGINE Curing Disease and Saving Lives Part 2

As promised, here is Part 2 of our blog coverage on the BIO International Convention currently ongoing in San Francisco. Here are a few more insights on the talks we attended and highlights of other coverage from top biotech journalists and media outlets.

Keynote with Dr. Bennet Omalu and Will Smith on “Concussion”

If you haven’t seen the movie Concussion, add it to your watch list right now. It’s certainly at the top of mine after listening to Nigerian-American doctor Bennet Omalu share his story about how he single-handedly changed the way the National Football League (NFL) and the world views concussions and brain science.

Will Smith and Dr. Bennet Omalu at #BIO2016

Will Smith and Dr. Bennet Omalu at #BIO2016

In this keynote address, Dr. Omalu sat down with actor Will Smith, who portrays Dr. Omalu in the movie, to discuss how knowledge and truth precipitates evolution. Because of his passion for seeking the truth, Omalu’s autopsy of former NFL player Mike Webster led to the first diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Omalu’s main message was that faith and science go hand in hand. “Faith searches for truth and science searches for truth. There is no end to truth.” He also emphasized that while the truth can be inconvenient, it’s worth pursuing because truth is empowering.

For Will Smith, portraying Dr. Omalu in Concussion, was both an honor and a duty. As a parent of a son who plays football, he was compelled to tell this story and share this knowledge with parents around the world. Smith was so motivated to take on Omalu’s character that he even watched Omalu conduct four autopsies so he could really understand both the man and the science behind CTE.

This dynamic conversation was the highlight of BIO, and you can read more details about it in this article by Eleena Korban of BIOtechNOW. 

Fireside chat with US FDA Commissioner Robert Califf

Robert Califf and Steve Usdin

Robert Califf and Steve Usdin

Robert Califf, the Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, sat down with Steve Usdin, the Senior Editor with BioCentury, to discuss the most important topics facing the FDA right now. Here are some of his main points:

  • FDA will focus more on patient engagement. Califf said that patients should be involved from the beginning and not just be the recipients of the end product. He also touched on risk tolerance for patients and that it can vary based on disease. The FDA wants to engage patients, advocacy groups, and industry on this topic so that patients can make more educated decisions about their treatment options.
  • The cost of clinical trials is going up 3-4 times the consumer price index which is not sustainable. Califf suggested that we can use integrated health systems and already available data from electronic medical records and patient registries to reduce the costs of large clinical trials. He commented, “The question is, can you create a different playing field that would radically reduce the cost of clinical trials while actually getting us better data about what people really care about and solve their problems related to the use of our products. I think we are close to that point now.”
  • Califf mentioned the FDA’s role in President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative as a step towards radically accelerating the rate of drug development. The FDA is partnering with the NIH to create a cloud-based workspace where genetic information on disease can be stored, shared, and studied.
  • Lastly, Califf mentioned how the FDA is creating a virtual center of excellence for cancer research as part of the Cancer Moonshot Initiative. He said that the FDA needs to do a better job of collaborating across its different product centers and that drug devices and biologics will be brought together starting first in the oncology space, and then eventually rolled out to other disease areas. On the clinical side, they will focus on patient involvement and the needs of cancer patients.

More coverage on the FDA fireside chat from BIOtechNOW

 Final Thoughts

While BIO ends today, the partnerships, conversations, and innovation certainly will not. In just four short days, the vibrant and eager atmosphere of BIO has transformed this year’s theme of Imagination into one of hopeful reality. Curing disease and saving lives might not be in the immediate future, but after what I’ve seen at BIO, I’m confident that the groundwork has been laid out to accelerate us down this path.


Other #BIO2016 coverage

IMAGINE Curing Disease and Saving Lives: BIO 2016 Part 1

Did you hear that? It’s the sound of more than 15,000 people taking a collective breath. That’s because we are now at the halfway point of the 2016 BIO International Convention, the world’s largest biotechnology gathering with over 900 speakers, 180 company presentations, 19 education tracks, 6 super sessions, and 35,000 partnering meetings. Now that’s a lot of stuff!

While many at BIO are focused on partnering – establishing new and exciting relationships with other biotech and pharmaceutical companies to push their products forward – others come to BIO to learn about the latest in research, innovation, and healthcare in the biotechnology space.

With so much going on at once, it’s hard to choose where to spend your time. If you follow BIO on twitter using the hashtag #BIO2016, you’ll get a condensed version of the who, what, and how of BIO.

For those of you who are more partial to blogs, here’s a brief recap of the talks that we’ve attended so far:

Mitochondrial Disease Education Session

A panel of scientific experts and patient advocates gave an overview of mitochondrial diseases and the latest research efforts to develop therapies for mitochondrial disease patients. Phil Yeske of the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation described his foundation as the largest funder of mitochondrial research next to the government. Their focus is on patient-centered therapeutic development and they’ve established a community registry of patients that makes patients the central stewards for research and clinical development.

The most moving part of this session was an impromptu speech by Liz Kennerley, a mitochondrial disease patient and advocate. She bravely spoke about the roller coaster of symptoms affecting all of the organs in her body and aptly described her daily experience by quoting Forest Gump, “Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re gonna get.” She ended with the powerful statement that patients are at the core of everything scientists do, and encouraged the panel to engage patients more often because they will tell you everything if you ask them the right questions.

Mitochondrial Disease Patient Liz Kennerley.

Mitochondrial Disease Patient Liz Kennerley speaks at BIO 2016.

Moving out of Stealth Mode: Biotech journalists offer real-world advice on working with media to tell your story

One of my favorite panels of the conference so far featured three biotech journalists, Christina Farr of Fast Company, Jeff Cranmer of BioCentury, and Alex Lash of Xconomy. It was a dynamic conversation about how biotech companies coming out of stealth mode can best pitch their story to the media. Take home points include:

  • When pitching to a journalist, make sure that you are honest about what you can and can’t say. Have a “BS committee” that can address the validity of your work and your research claims.
  • When pitching, journalists want to know what the problem is you’re trying to solve and how you are trying to solve it better than anyone else.
  • On press releases: Unless it’s a press release from a big name, journalists won’t read it. The panel said they would prefer a personalized email detailing a company’s background and stage of work. They would also consider reading a press release that included a short personalized email from the company CEO.
  • Most hated words used to describe research: “Revolutionary” “Game-changing” “Disruptive”.

    Biotech journalist panel with.

    Moderator Carin Canale-Theakston with biotech journalists Jeff Cranmer, Alex Lash, and Christina Farr

Fireside Chat with University of California President Janet Napolitano

In an intimate Fireside chat, Janet Napolitano described her passion for higher education and making a difference in students’ lives. In her new role as the President of the UC system, her main focus is on aligning the policies and initiatives between the UC campuses and promoting research and innovation that can be commercialized around the world.

When asked about how she values basic research compared to applied research, Napolitano responded,

UC President Janet Napolitano

UC President Janet Napolitano

“We want an atmosphere where basic research is supported and one where innovation and entrepreneurship is fostered through incubators and public/private partnerships. We need to make these a tangible reality.”

 

Napolitano also mentioned that the UC system needs support from the private sector and gave PrimeUC – a collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Innovation that is part of her innovation and entrepreneurship initiative – as an example of a step in the right direction. You can read more about PrimeUC in this Event Recap.

From Ebola to Zika, how can we go faster in a global emergency?

I was only able to sit in on part of this expert panel, but here is the gist of their conversation. The global number of human infectious diseases is rapidly increasing every year due to hard-to-control factors like overpopulation, deforestation, and global climate change.  As a result, we’ve had two global health emergencies in the past two years: Ebola and Zika. We were more prepared to deal with the Ebola epidemic because more treatments were already in development. Unfortunately, we weren’t as prepared for Zika as it wasn’t on the world’s radar as a serious disease until 2015.

Martin Friede of the World Health Organization (WHO) said we should take what we learned from the recent Ebola outbreak and apply it to the Zika threat. He said the WHO wants to plan ahead for future outbreaks and remove bottlenecks to health benefits. They want to predict what diseases might surface in the future and have products ready for approval by the time those diseases manifest.


That’s all for now, but be sure to read Part 2 of our BIO2016 coverage tomorrow on the Stem Cellar. We will give highlights from an entertaining and fascinating Keynote address with Dr. Bennet Omalu (the doctor who blew the whistle on concussion in the NFL) and Oscar-nominated actor Will Smith (who played Dr. Omalu in the movie “Concussion”) on “Knowledge precipitates Evolution”. I’ll also tell you about an eye-opening Fireside chat with the US Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Robert Califf, and much more!

Get your BIO on: Sneak Peak of the June 2016 BIO Convention in SF

Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 8.43.36 AM

Summer is almost here and for scientists around the world, that means it’s time to flock to one of the world’s biggest biotech meetings, the BIO International Convention.

This year, BIO is hosted in the lovely city of San Francisco. From June 6-9th, over 15,000 biotechnology and pharma leaders, as well as other professionals, academics, and patients will congregate to learn, educate, and network.

There’s something for everyone at this convention. If you check out the BIO agenda, you’ll find a plethora of talks, events, education sessions, and fire side chats on almost any topic related to science and biotechnology that you can imagine. The hard part will be deciding what to attend in only four short days.

For those going to BIO this year, make sure to check out the myBIO event planning tool that’s free for attendees and allows you to browse events and create a personalized agenda. You can also set up a professional profile that will share your background and networking interests with others at BIO. With this nifty tool, you can search for scientists, companies, and speakers you might want to connect with during the convention. Think of all the potential networking opportunities right at your fingertips!

Will Smith (source)

Will Smith (source)

For those who can’t make it to BIO, don’t worry, we have you covered. CIRM will be at the convention blogging and live tweeting. Because our mission is to bring stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs, the majority of our coverage will be on talks and sessions related to regenerative medicine and patient advocacy. However, there are definitely some sessions outside these areas that we won’t want to miss such as the Tuesday Keynote talk by Dr. Bennet Omalu – who helped reveal the extent of brain damage in the NFL – and actor Will Smith – who plays Dr. Omalu in the movie ‘Concussion’. Their join talk is called “Knowledge Precipitates Evolution.”

Here’s a sneak peak of some of the other talks and events that we think will be especially interesting:


Monday June 6th

Education Sessions on Brain Health and Mitochondrial Disease

Moving Out of Stealth Mode: Biotech Journalists Offer Real-World Advice on Working with Media to Tell Your Story

“In this interactive panel discussion, well-known biotech reporters from print and online outlets will share their insights on how to successfully work with the media. Session attendees will learn critical needs of the media from what makes a story newsworthy to how to “pitch” a reporter to strategies for translating complicated science into a story for a broad audience.”

The Bioethics of Drug Development: You Decide

A discussion of the critical bioethical issues innovative manufacturers face in today’s healthcare ecosystem. Panelists will provide insights from a diverse set of perspectives, including investors, the patient advocacy community, bioethicists and federal regulators.”


Tuesday June 7th

Fireside Chat with Robert Califf, Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Fireside Chat with Janet Napolitano, President of the University of California

Casting a Wider Net in Alzheimer’s Research: The Diversity of Today’s Approaches and Signs of Progress

Hear clinical researchers, biotech CEOs, and patient advocates explain how the field is pivoting from the failures of past approaches to make use of the latest generation of beta-amyloid research results as well as pursue alternative therapeutic angles to improve brain health.”

From Ebola to Zika: How Can We Go Faster in a Global Emergency?

This interactive panel of public health and industry leaders will discuss what has been learned through our global response to Ebola and what is and is not applicable to Zika or other pathogens of pandemic potential.”


Wednesday June 8th

Curative Therapies: Aligning Policy with Science to Ensure Patient Access

“The promise of curative treatments creates an urgent need to ensure access for patients, promote an environment conducive to developing new treatments, and manage the concentration of healthcare expenses in a sustainable manner.  A diverse set of panelists will tackle the tough questions around curative therapies and discern what changes are necessary for our health care delivery system to meet the challenges they pose.”

An Evolving Paradigm: Advancing the Science of Patient Input in the Drug Development and Regulatory Processes

This panel will explore advances in the field of assessing patient views and perspectives, and highlight how the patient voice is being incorporated into development programs and informing FDA review and approval decisions.”

A Media Perspective

“Any press is good press or so they say. You want your story known at the right time and in the right light, but how do you get industry journalist to notice you? What peaks their interest and how do they go about story discovery? What will they be looking to write about in the next 3 to 12 months? Three top journalists will discuss their approaches to keeping current and what makes a story newsworthy.”
Patient Advocacy Meetup

Over 40 patient advocacy organizations will be discussing their latest partnerships and developments in the areas of advancing disease research and drug development.


Thursday June 9th

Novel Advances in Cancer R&D: Meeting the Needs of the Patient

This panel will feature the views of patients and advocates, regulators, and companies who are working to change the way in which we diagnose and evaluate patients with cancer by better understanding the underlying biology of their disease.”


 To follow our coverage of BIO, visit our Stem Cellar Blog or follow us on Twitter at @CIRMNews.