Video illustrates potential path to stem cell repair for multiple sclerosis

“Can you imagine slowly losing the ability to live life as you know it? To slowly lose the ability to see, to walk, to grab an object, all the while experiencing pain, fatigue and depression?”

These sobering questions are posed at the beginning of a recent video produced by Youreka Science and Americans for Cures about multiple sclerosis (MS), a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder in which a person’s own immune system attacks cells that are critical for sending nerve signals from the brain and spinal cord to our limbs and the rest of our body.

In recognition of Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Week, today’s blog features this video. Using an easy to understand narrative and engaging hand-drawn illustrations, this whiteboard “explainer” video does a terrific job of describing the biological basis of multiple sclerosis. It also highlights promising research out of UC Irvine showing that stem cell-based therapies may one day help repair the damage caused by multiple sclerosis.

But don’t take my word for it, check out the five-minute video below:

Related Links:

Stem Cell Roundup: No nerve cells for you, old man; stem cells take out the trash; clues to better tattoo removal

Stem cell image of the week: Do they or don’t they? The debate on new nerve cell growth in adult brain rages on.


Young neurons (green) are shown in the human hippocampus at the ages of (from left) birth, 13 years old and 35 years old. Images by Arturo Alvarez-Buylla lab

For the longest time, it was simply a given among scientists that once you reach adulthood, your brain’s neuron-making days were over. Then, over the past several decades, evidence emerged that the adult brain can indeed make new neurons, in a process called neurogenesis. Now the pendulum of understanding may be swinging back based on research reported this week out of Arturo Alvarez-Buylla’s lab at UCSF.

Through the careful examination of 59 human brain samples (from post mortem tissue and those collected during epilepsy surgery), Alvarez-Buylla’s team in collaboration with many other labs around the world, found lots of neurogenesis in neonatal and newborn brains. But after 1 year of age, a steep drop in the number of new neurons was observed. Those numbers continued to plummet through childhood and were barely detectable in samples from teens. New neurons were undetectable in adult brain samples.

This week’s stem cell image shows this dramatic decline of new neurons when comparing brain samples from a newborn, a 13 year-old and a 35 year-old.

It was no surprise that these surprising results, published in Nature, got quite a bit of attention by a wide range of news outlets including the LA Times, CNN, The Scientist and NPR to name just a few.

Limitless life of stem cells requires taking out the trash

It’s minding blowing to me that, given the proper nutrients, an embryonic stem cell in a lab dish can exist indefinitely. The legendary fountain of youth that Ponce de León searched in vain for is actually hidden inside these remarkable cells. So how do they do it? It’s a tantalizing question for researchers because the answers could lead to a better understanding of and eventually novel therapies for age-related diseases.


Cartoon of a proteosome, the cell’s garbage disposal. Image: Wikipedia

A team from the University of Cologne reports this week on a connection between the removal of degraded proteins and the longevity of stem cells. Cells in general use special enzymes to tag wonky proteins for the cellular trash heap, called a proteasome. Without this ability to clean up, unwanted proteins can accumulate and make cells unhealthy, a scenario that is seen in age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s. The research team found that reducing the protein disposal activity in embryonic stem cells disrupted characteristics that are specific to these cells. So, one way stem cells may keep their youthful appearance is by being good about taking out their trash.

The study was published in Scientific Reports and picked up by Science Daily.

Why tattoos stay when your skin cells don’t ( by Kevin McCormack)

We replace our skin cells every two or three weeks. As each layer dies, the stem cells in the skin replace them with a new batch. With that in mind you’d think that a tattoo, which is just ink injected into the skin with a needle, would disappear as each layer of skin is replaced. But obviously it doesn’t. Now some French researchers think they have figured out why.


Thank your macrophages for keeping your tattoo intact. Tattoo by: Sansanana

It’s not just fun science, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, it could also mean that that embarrassing tattoo you got saying you would love Fred or Freda forever, can one day be easily removed.

The researchers found that when the tattoo needle inflicts a wound on the skin, specialized cells called macrophages flock to the site and take up the ink. As those macrophages die, instead of the ink disappearing with them, new macrophages come along, gobble up the ink and so the tattoo lives on.

In an interview with Health News Digest, Bernard Malissen, one of the lead investigators, says the discovery, could help erase a decision made in a moment of madness:

“Tattoo removal can be likely improved by combining laser surgery with the transient ablation of the macrophages present in the tattoo area. As a result, the fragmented pigment particles generated using laser pulses will not be immediately recaptured, a condition increasing the probability of having them drained away via the lymphatic vessels.”

It’s World Kidney Day: Highlighting CIRM’s Investments in Treating Kidney Failure

WKD-Logo-HiToday is World Kidney Day. Hundreds of events across the globe are taking place “to raise awareness of the importance of our kidneys to our overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems worldwide.” (Side note: in recognition that today is also International Women’s Day, World Kidney Day’s theme this year is “Kidney’s & Women: Include, Value, Empower.)

To honor this day, we’re highlighting how CIRM is playing its part in that mission. The infographic below provides big picture summaries of the four CIRM-funded clinical trials that are currently testing stem cell-based therapies for kidney failure, a condition that affects well over 600,000 Americans.

When a person’s kidneys fail, their body can no longer filter out waste products and extra fluid from the blood which leads to life-threatening complications. About 30% of those affected in the U.S. have organ transplants. Due to the limited availability of donor organs, the other 70% need dialysis, a blood filtration therapy, that requires several trips a week to a special clinic.

Both treatment options have serious limitations. Organ recipients have to take drugs that prevent organ rejections for the rest of their lives. Over time, these drugs are toxic and can increase a patient’s risk of infection, heart disease, cancer and diabetes. In the case of dialysis treatment, the current procedure uses a plastic tube called a shunt to connect to a patient’s vein. These shunts are far from ideal and can lead to infection, blood clots and can be rejected by the patient’s immune system. These complications probably play a role in the average life expectancy of 5-10 years for dialysis patients.

Four CIRM-funded clinical trials aim to circumvent these drawbacks. Humacyte has received over $24 million from the Agency to support two clinical trials that are testing an alternative to the plastic shunt used in dialysis treatment. The company has developed a bioengineered vessel that is implanted in the patient’s arm and over time is populated with the patient’s own stem cells which develop into a natural blood vessel. The trials will determine if the bioengineered vessel is superior to the shunt in remaining open for longer periods of time and with lower incidence of interventions due to blood clots and infections.

The other two CIRM-funded trials, one headed by Stanford University and the other by Medeor Therapeutics, aims to eliminate the need for long-life, anti-rejection medicine after kidney transplant. Both trials use a similar strategy: blood stem cells and immune cells from the organ donor are infused into the patient receiving the organ. If all goes as planned, those donor cells will engraft into and mix with the recipient’s immune system, making organ rejection less likely and ending the need for immune-system suppressing drugs.

For more details visit our Clinical Trial Dashboard.


Researchers find connection between aging muscles and mutations in stem cells

It’s a humbling fact of life that our muscles decline as we age which is why you didn’t see any 50-year-olds competing for Olympic Gold in figure skating at the 2018 Winter Games.

You can blame your muscle stem cells for this. Also called satellite cells, these adult stem cells lie mostly dormant in muscle tissue until, in response to exercise or injury, they begin to divide, specialize and replenish damaged muscle cells. But, this restorative function declines over time diminishing the ability of aging muscle stem cells to grow new muscle, and in turn, leading to a gradual deterioration in strength and agility.

muscle stem cell

Muscle stem cell (pink with green outline) sits along a muscle fiber. Image: Michael Rudnicki/OIRM

While this connection between aging muscle and stem cells has been well-known, the underlying reasons are less well understood. However, a recent Nature Communications study by researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden makes an important inroad: muscle stem cells from healthy, older individuals have a surprising number of genetic mutations compared to their younger counterparts.

To carry out the comparison, the researchers isolated muscle stem cells from muscle biopsies taken from groups of young (21-24 yrs) and more senior (68-75 yrs) healthy adults. Single cell DNA sequencing (which creates a genetic blueprint for individual cells) showed that the older stem cells had accumulated 2 to 3 times more mutations in genes that are active in the muscle stem cells. This higher “burden” of mutations also appeared to impair cell function: in the older group, those stem cells with higher numbers of mutations had a lower capacity to divide and specialize into certain types of muscle cells. The younger stem cells did not show this behavior suggesting they are better protected from these mutations, as team lead, Professor Maria Eriksson, explained in a press release:


Maria Eriksson. Photo: Ulf Sirborn

“We can demonstrate that this protection diminishes the older you become, indicating an impairment in the cell’s capacity to repair their DNA. And this is something we should be able to influence with new drugs.”



In addition to possible drug interventions, Dr. Eriksson is also interested in evaluating the role of exercise to counteract the effects of these mutations:

“We aim to discover whether it is possible to individually influence the burden of mutations. Our results may be beneficial for the development of exercise programs, particularly those designed for an aging population.”

Stem cell-based gut-on-a-chip: a new path to personalized medicine

“Personalized medicine” is a trendy phrase these days, frequently used in TV ads for hospitals, newspaper articles about medicine’s future and even here in the Stem Cellar. The basic gist is that by analyzing a patient’s unique biology, a physician can use disease treatments that are most likely to work in that individual.


Emulate’s Organ-on-a-Chip device.
Image: Emulate, Inc.

This concept is pretty straight-forward but it’s not always clear to me how it would play out as a routine clinical service for patients. A recent publication in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology by scientists at Cedars-Sinai and Emulate, Inc. paints a clearer picture. The report describes a device, Emulate’s Intestine-Chip, that aims to personalize drug treatments for people suffering from gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease and Chrohn’s disease.

Intestine-Chip combines the cutting-edge technologies of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and microfluidic engineering. For the iPSC part of the equation, skin or blood samples are collected from a patient and reprogrammed into stem cells that can mature into almost any cell type in the body. Grown under the right conditions in a lab dish, the iPSCs self-organize into 3D intestinal organoids, structures made up of a few thousand cells with many of the hallmarks of a bona fide intestine.


Miniature versions of a human intestinal lining, known as organoids, derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).
Image: Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute

These iPSC-derived organoids have been described in previous studies and represent a breakthrough for studying human intestinal diseases. Yet, they vary a lot in shape and size, making it difficult to capture consistent results. And because the intestinal organoids form into hollow tubes, it’s a challenge to get drugs inside the organoid, a necessary step to systematically test the effects of various drugs on the intestine.

The Intestine-Chip remedies these drawbacks. About the size of a double A battery, the Chip is made up of specialized plastic engineered with tiny tunnels, or micro-channels. The research team placed the iPSC-derived intestinal organoid cells into the micro-channels and showed that passing fluids with a defined set of ingredients through the device can prod the cells to mimic the human intestine.

RMI IntestinalChip

Cells of a human intestinal lining, after being placed in an Intestine-Chip, form intestinal folds as they do in the human body. Image: Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute

The Intestine-Chip not only looks like a human intestine but acts like one too. A protein known to be at high levels in inflammatory bowel disease was passed through the microchannel and the impact on the intestinal cells matched what is seen in patients. Clive Svendsen, Ph.D., a co-author on the study and director of the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, explained the exciting applications that the Intestine-Chip opens up for patients:


Clive Svendsen

“This pairing of biology and engineering allows us to re-create an intestinal lining that matches that of a patient with a specific intestinal disease—without performing invasive surgery to obtain a tissue sample,” he said in a press release. “We can produce an unlimited number of copies of this tissue and use them to evaluate potential therapies. This is an important advance in personalized medicine.”

Emulate’s sights are not just set on the human intestine but for the many other organs affected by disease. And because disease rarely impacts only one organ, a series of Organs-on-Chips for a particular patient could be examined together. Geraldine A. Hamilton, Ph.D., president and chief scientific officer of Emulate, Inc. summed up this point in a companion press release:


Geraldine Hamilton

“By creating a personalized Patient-on-a-Chip, we can really begin to understand how diseases, medicines, chemicals and foods affect an individual’s health.”



In a stem cell first, functioning human kidney structures grown in living animals

One of the ultimate quests in the stem cell field – growing organs to repair diseased or damaged ones – took a significant step forward this week. In a first, researchers at the University of Manchester, in the U.K., showed that human embryonic stem cell-derived kidney tissue forms into functional kidney structures, capable of filtering blood and producing urine, when implanted under the skin of mice.


Cross-section of human stem cell-derived kidney tissue grown in mouse. When injected in blood, dextran (green) was taken up by the kidney structure, proving it’s functional. (Credit University of Manchester/ Stem Cell Reports)

When a person has end-stage kidney disease, their body can no longer filter out waste products and extra fluid from the blood which leads to serious health complications, even death. Blood filtration therapy, called dialysis, can substitute for a kidney but the average life expectancy is only about 10 years for patients receiving dialysis. Kidney transplants are another answer for treating kidney disease, but organ availability is in limited supply. About 2.2 million people die worldwide from a lack of access to these treatment options. So other therapeutic approaches to help end-stage kidney disease sufferers are sorely needed.

The current study, published in Stem Cell Reports, used human embryonic stem cells to grow kidney tissue in the lab. While the lab-grown tissues showed hallmarks of kidney structures, they were unable to fully develop into mature kidney structures in a culture dish. So the scientists tried implanting the human kidney tissue under the skin of mice and left it there for 12 weeks. The team showed that kidney structures, called glomeruli, which play a key role in filtering the blood, formed over that time and had become vascularized, or connected with the animal’s blood supply. The team further showed those structures were functional by injecting a fluorescently tagged substance called dextran. Tracing the fate of the dextran in the blood showed that it had been filtered and taken up by tubular structures in the kidney tissue which indicates urine production had begun.

Professor Sue Kimber, one of the leaders of the study, summed up the significance and current limitations of these results in a press release:


Sue Kimber

“We have proved beyond any doubt these structures function as kidney cells by filtering blood and producing urine – though we can’t yet say what percentage of function exists. What is particularly exciting is that the structures are made of human cells which developed an excellent capillary blood supply, becoming linked to the vasculature of the mouse.

Though this structure was formed from several hundred glomeruli, and humans have about a million in their kidneys – this is clearly a major advance. It constitutes a proof of principle- but much work is yet to be done.”

To be sure, curing a person suffering from end-stage kidney disease with a stem cell-grown kidney is some ways off. But, on the nearer horizon, this advance will provide a means to study the human kidney in a living animal, a powerful tool for uncovering insights into kidney disease and new therapeutic approaches.

Stem Cell Roundup: New infertility tools, helping the 3 blind mice hear and cow ESCs

Cool Stem Cell Image of the Week


Human egg grown from immature cells in ovarian tissue. (credit: David Albertini)

This week’s Cool Stem Cell Image of the Week comes to us from the lab of reproductive biologist Evelyn Telfer at the University of Edinburgh. Telfer and her team successfully grew human eggs cells from immature ovarian tissue.

This technology could revolutionize the way doctors approach infertility. For instance, when girls and young women undergo chemotherapy for cancer, their eggs are often damaged. By preserving a small piece of ovarian tissue before the cancer treatments, this method could be used to generate eggs later in life for in vitro fertilization. Much more work is necessary to figure out if these eggs are healthy and safe to use to help infertile women.

The study was recently published in Molecular Human Reproduction and was picked up this Science writer Kelly Servick.

Forget 3 blind mice, iPS cells could help 3 deaf mice hear again (Kevin McCormack)
For years scientists have been trying to use stem cells to restore hearing to people who are deaf or hearing impaired. Now a group of researchers in Japan may have found a way.

The team used human iPS cells to create inner ear cells, the kind damaged in one of the most common forms of hereditary deafness. They then transplanted them into the inner ears of mice developing in the womb that are suffering from a congenital form of hearing loss. The cells appeared to engraft and produce a protein, Connexin 30, known to be critical in hearing development.

The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, could be an important step towards developing a therapy for congenital hearing loss in people.

UC Davis team isolates cow embryonic stem cells for the first time


An early stage cow embryo. Inner cell mass (red) is source of embryonic stem cells. (Credit: Pablo Ross/UC Davis) 

Although human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were isolated way back in ’98, researchers haven’t had similar luck with embryonic stem cells from cows. Until this week, that is.  A UC Davis team just published a report in PNAS showing that they not only can isolate cow ESCs but their method works almost 100% of the time.


Genetic engineering of these cow stem cells could have huge implications for the cattle industry. Senior author Pablo Ross mentioned in a press release how this breakthrough could help speed up the process of generating superior cows that produce more milk, release less methane and are more resistant to disease:

“In two and a half years, you could have a cow that would have taken you about 25 years to achieve. It will be like the cow of the future. It’s why we’re so excited about this.”

These cow ESCs may also lead to better models of human disease. Because of their small size, rat and mouse models are not always a good representation of how potential therapies or drugs will affect humans. Creating stem cell models from larger animals may provide a better representation.

Novel approach to slowing deadly brain cancer stem cells may lead to new treatments

Glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer, is one of the most dreaded cancer diagnoses. Standard radiation and chemotherapy treatments for glioblastoma almost always prove ineffective because of the cancer’s ability to grow back. With their unlimited potential to self-renew, cancer stem cells within the brain tumor are thought to be responsible for its aggressive reoccurrence. Not surprisingly, researchers looking to develop more effective therapies are focused on trying to better understand the biology of these cancer stem cells in order to exploit their vulnerabilities.


MRI image of high grade glioma brain tumor (white mass on left). Image: Wikipedia

This week, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center reports that a research team led by Damian A. Almiron Bonnin has identified a cell signal that the brain cancer stem cells rely on to resist standard treatments and to regrow. They also showed that drugs which interrupt this signal reduced tumor growth in animal studies.

Because if its aggressive growth, the cells within the glioblastoma eventually become starved for oxygen or, in scientific lingo, they become hypoxic. The presence of hypoxia in brain tumors is actually predictive of a poor prognosis in affected patients. A protein called hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) becomes activated in these low oxygen conditions and helps the cancer stem cells to survive and continue to grow. The research team found that HIF carries out this function by triggering a cascade of cell activity that leads to the secretion of a protein called VEGF out into the microenvironment of the tumor. As secreted VEGF spreads through the tumor, it stimulates new blood vessel growth which is key to the tumor’s survival by nourishing the tumor with oxygen and nutrients.

Adding drugs that block a cell’s ability to release proteins, led to a reduction in glioblastoma tumor growth both in petri dishes and in animal studies. With these results, published in Oncogene, Dr. Almiron Bonnin’s team is performing the necessary preclinical studies that could lead to testing this novel strategy in patients. He summed this effort in a press release:


Damian Almiron Bonnin

“Being able to target the cancer stem cells within these tumors, like we did here, could potentially improve response to current chemotherapies and prevent recurrences, which would translate into an increase in patient survival rates.”


Just a Mom: The Journey of a Sickle Cell Disease Patient Advocate [video]

Adrienne Shapiro will tell you that she’s just a mom.

And it’s true. She is just a mom. Just a mom who is the fourth generation of mothers in her family to have children born with sickle cell disease. Just a mom who was an early advocate of innovative stem cell and gene therapy research by UCLA scientist Dr. Don Kohn which has led to an on-going, CIRM-funded clinical trial for sickle cell disease. Just a mom who is the patient advocate representative on a Clinical Advisory Panel (CAP) that CIRM is creating to help guide this clinical trial.

She’s just a mom who has become a vocal stem cell activist, speaking to various groups about the importance of CIRM’s investments in both early stage research and clinical trials. She’s just a mom who was awarded a Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Action Award at last month’s World Stem Cell Summit. She’s just a mom who, in her own words, “sees a new world not just for her children but for so many other children”, through the promise of stem cell therapies.

Yep, she’s just a mom. And it’s the tireless advocacy of moms like Adrienne that will play a critical role in accelerating stem cell therapies to patients with unmet medical needs. We can use all the moms we can get.

Adrienne Shapiro speaks to the CIRM governing Board about her journey as a patient advocate

The Journey of a Homegrown Stem Cell Research All-Star

Nothing makes a professional sports team prouder than its homegrown talent. Training and mentoring a promising, hard-working athlete who eventually helps carry the team to a championship can lift the spirits of an entire city.

Gerhard and Brian 1

Brian Fury

Here at CIRM, we hold a similar sense of pride in Brian Fury, one of our own homegrown all-stars. Nearly a decade ago, Brian was accepted into the inaugural class of CIRM’s Bridges program which provides paid stem cell research internships to students at California universities and colleges that don’t have major stem cell research programs. The aim of the program, which has trained over 1200 students to date, is to build the stem cell work force here in California to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

A CIRM full circle
Today, Brian is doing just that as manager of manufacturing at the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures (IRC) where he leads the preparation of stem cell therapy products for clinical trials in patients. It was at UC Davis that he did his CIRM Bridges internship as a Sacramento State masters student back in 2009. So, he’s really come full circle, especially considering he currently works in a CIRM-funded facility and manufactures stem cell therapy products for CIRM-funded clinical trials.


Gerhard Bauer

“Many of the technicians we have in the [cell manufacturing] facility are actually from the Bridges program CIRM has funded, and were educated by us,” Gerhard Bauer, Brian’s boss and director of the facility, explained to me. “Brian, in particular, has made me incredibly proud. To witness that the skills and knowledge I imparted onto my student would make him such an integral part of our program and would lead to so many novel products to be administered to people, helping with so many devastating diseases is a very special experience. I treasure it every day.”

“It sustains me”
Brian’s career path wasn’t always headed toward stem cell science. In a previous life, he was an undergrad in computer management information systems. It was a required biology class at the time that first sparked his interest in the subject. He was fascinated by the course and was inspired by his professor, Cathy Bradshaw. He still recalls a conversation he had with her to better understand her enthusiasm for biology:

“I asked her, ‘what is it about biology that really made you decide this is what you wanted to do?’ And she just said, ‘It sustains me. It is air in my lungs.’ It was what she lived and breathed. That really stuck with me early on.“

Still, Brian went on to earn his computer degree and worked as a computer professional for several years after college. But when the dot com boom went bust in the early 2000’s, Brian saw it as a sign to re-invent himself. Remembering that course with Professor Bradshaw, he went back to school to pursue a biology degree at Sacramento State University.

On a path before there was a path
Not content with just his textbooks and lectures at Sac State, Brian offered to volunteer in any lab he could find, looking for opportunities to get hands-on experience:

Sac State 1

Brian at work during his Sacramento State days.

“I was really hungry to get involved and I really wanted to not just be in class and learning about all these amazing things in biology but I also wanted to start putting them to work. And so, I looked for any opportunity that I could to become actively involved in actually seeing how biology really works and not just the theory.”

This drive to learn led to several volunteer stints in labs on campus as well as a lab manager job. But it was an opportunity he pursued as he was finishing up his degree that really set in motion his current career path. Gerhard Bauer happened to be giving a guest lecture at Sac State about UC Davis’ efforts to develop a stem cell-based treatment for HIV. Hearing that talk was an epiphany for Brian. “That’s really what hooked me in and helped determine that this is definitely the field that I want to enter into. It was my stepping off point.”


Brian Fury (center) flanked by mentors Gerhard Bauer (left) and Jan Nolta (right)

Inspired, Brian secured a volunteering gig on that project at UC Davis – along with all his other commitments at Sac State – working under Bauer and Dr. Jan Nolta, the director of the UC Davis Stem Cell Program.

That was 2008 and this little path Brian was creating by himself was just about to get some serious pavement. The next year, Sacramento State was one of sixteen California schools that was awarded the CIRM Bridges to Stem Cell Research grant. Their five-year, $3 million award (the total CIRM investment for all the schools was over $55 million) helped support a full-blown, stem cell research-focused master’s program which included 12-month, CIRM-funded internships. One of the host researchers for the internships was, you guessed it, Jan Nolta at UC Davis.

Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) was a good move
Applying to this new program was a no brainer for Brian and, sure enough, he was one of ten students selected for the first-year class. His volunteer HIV project in the Nolta lab seamlessly dovetailed into his Bridges internship project. He was placed under the mentorship of Dr. Joseph Anderson, a researcher in the Nolta lab at the time, and gained many important skills in stem cell research. Brian’s project focused on a stem cell and gene therapy approach to making HIV-resistant immune cells with the long-term goal of eradicating the virus in patients. In fact, follow on studies by the Anderson lab have helped lead to a CIRM-funded clinical trial, now underway at UC Davis, that’s testing a stem cell-based treatment for HIV/AIDs patients.

After his Bridges internship came to a close, Brian worked on a few short-term research projects at UC Davis but then found himself in a similar spot: needing to strike out on a career path that wasn’t necessarily clearly paved. He reached out to Nolta and Bauer and basically cut to the chase in an email asking, “do you know anybody?”. Bauer reply immediately, “yeah, me!”. It was late 2011 and UC Davis had built a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility with the help of a CIRM Major Facility grant. Bauer only had one technician at the time and work was starting to pick up.


The Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility in UC Davis’ Institute for Regenerative Cures.

A GMP facility is a specialized laboratory where clinical-grade cell products are prepared for use in people. To ensure the cells are not contaminated, the entire lab is sealed off from the outside environment and researchers must don full-body lab suits. We produced the video below about the GMP facility just before it opened.

Bauer knew Brian would be perfect at their GMP facility:

“Brian was a student in the first cohort of CIRM Bridges trainees and took my class Bio225 – stem cell biology and manufacturing practices. He excelled in this class, and I also could observe his lab skills in the GMP training part incorporated in this class. I was very lucky to be able to hire Brian then, since I knew what excellent abilities he had in GMP manufacturing.”

CIRM-supported student now supporting CIRM-funded clinical trials


Brian Fury suited up in GMP facility

Since then, Brian has worked his way up to managing the entire GMP facility and its production of cell therapy products. At last count, he and the five people he supervises are juggling sixteen cell manufacturing projects. One of his current clients is Angiocrine which has a CIRM-funded clinical trial testing a cell therapy aimed to improve the availability and engraftment of blood stem cell transplants. This treatment is geared for cancer patients who have had their cancerous bone marrow removed by chemotherapy.

When a company like Angiocrine approaches Brian at the GMP facility, they already have a well-defined method for generating their cell product. Brian’s challenge is figuring out how to scale up that process to make enough cells for all the patients participating in the clinical trial. And on top of that, he must design the procedures for the clean room environment of the GMP facility, where every element of making the cells must be written down and tracked to demonstrate safety to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The right time, the right place…and a whole bunch of determination and passion
It’s extremely precise and challenging work but that’s what makes it so exciting for Brian. He tells me he’s never bored and always wakes up looking forward to what each day’s challenges will bring and figuring out how he and his team are going get these products into the clinic. It’s a responsibility he takes very seriously because he realizes what it means for his clients:

“I invest as much energy and passion and commitment into these projects as I would my own family. This is extremely important to me and I feel so incredibly fortunate to have the opportunity to work on things like this. The reality is, in the GMP, people are bringing their life’s work to us in the hopes we can help people on the other end. They share all their years of development, knowledge and experience and put it in our hands and hope we can scale this up to make it meaningful for patients in need of these treatments.”

Despite all his impressive accomplishments, Brian is a very modest guy using phrases like “I was just in the right place at the right time,” during our conversation. But I was glad to hear him add “and I was the right candidate”. Because it’s clear to me that his determination and passion are the reasons for his success and is the epitome of the type of researcher CIRM had hoped its investment in the Bridges program and our SPARK high school internship program would produce for the stem cell research field.

That’s why we’ll be brimming over with an extra dose of pride on the day that one of Brian’s CIRM-funded stem cell therapy products reaches the goal line with an FDA approval.