Stem cell stories that caught our eye: designer socks for cancer patients, stem-cell derived stomachs and fighting off bone infections

Inspiring cancer patients with designer socks. (Karen Ring)
Here’s a motivating story we found in the news this week about a cancer survivor who’s bringing inspiration to other cancer patients with designer socks. Yes, you read that correctly, socks.

Jake Teitelbaum is a student at Wake Forest University and suffers from a rare form of blood cancer called Refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Since his diagnosis, Jake has been admitted to hospitals multiple times. Each time he received a welcome package of a gown and a pair of beige, “lifeless” socks. After his fifth welcome package, this time to receive a life-saving stem cell treatment, Jake had had enough of the socks.

He explained in a story by USA Today College,

“[Those socks] represented chemotherapy and being in isolation. They were the embodiment of that experience.”

Jake ditched the hospital socks and started bringing his own to prove that his cancer didn’t define him. Even though his cancer kept coming back, Jake wanted to prove he was just as resilient.

Jake Teitelbaum

Jake Teitelbaum

Feeling liberated and in control, Jake decided to share his socks with other patients by starting the Resilience Project. Patients can go to the Resilience website and design their own socks that represent their experiences with cancer. The Resilience project also raises money for cancer patients and their families.

“We provide tangible benefits and create fun socks, but what we’re doing comes back to the essence of resilience,” said Jake. “These terrible circumstances where we’re at our most vulnerable also give us the unique opportunity to grow.”

Jake was declared cancer free in October of 2016. You can learn more about the Resilience project on their website and by watching Jake’s video below.

 

Feeding disease knowledge with stem cell-derived stomach cells.
Using educated guess work and plenty of trial and error in the lab, researchers around the world have successfully generated many human tissues from stem cells, including heart muscle cells, insulin-producing cells and nerve cells to name just a few. Reporting this week in Nature, stem cell scientists at Cincinnati’s Children Hospital have a new cell type under their belt. Or maybe I should say above their belt, because they have devised a method for coaxing stem cells to become stomach mini organs that can be studied in a petri dish.

Confocal microscopic image shows tissue-engineered human stomach tissues from the corpus/fundus region, which produce acid and digestive enzymes. Image: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Confocal microscopic image shows tissue-engineered human stomach tissues from the corpus/fundus region, which produce acid and digestive enzymes. Image: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

With this method in hand, the team is poised to make new discoveries about how the stomach forms during human development and to better understand stomach diseases. In a press release, team lead Jim Wells pointed out the need to find new therapies for stomach disease:

“Diseases of the stomach impact millions of people in the United States and gastric [stomach] cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.”

The cells they generated are those found in the corpus/fundus area of the stomach which releases enzymes and hydrochloric acid to help us break down and digest the food we eat. The team is particularly interested to use the mini organs to study the impact of H. pylori infection, a type of bacteria that causes ulcers and has been linked to stomach cancers.

In an earlier study, Wells’ group devised stem cell recipes for making cells from an area of the stomach, called the antrum, that produces hormones that affect digestion and appetite. Wells thinks having both tissue types recreated in a petri dish may help provide a complete picture of stomach function:

James Wells

James Wells

“Now that we can grow both antral- and corpus/fundic-type human gastric mini-organs, it’s possible to study how these human gastric tissues interact physiologically, respond differently to infection, injury and react to pharmacologic treatments.”

 

 

A silver bullet for antibiotic-resistant bone infections?
Alexander Fleming’s discover of penicillin in the 1920’s marked the dawn of antibiotics – drugs which kill off bacteria and help stop infections. Rough estimates suggest that over 200 million lives have been saved by these wonder drugs. But over time there’s been a frightening rise in bacteria that are resistant to almost all available antibiotics.

These super resistant “bugs” are particularly scary for people with chronic bone infections because the intense, long term antibiotic medication required to keep the infection in check isn’t effective. But based on research published this week in Tissue Engineering, the use of stem cells and silver may provide a new treatment option.

Scanning Electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, brown spheres) surrounded by cellular debris. MRSA, the bacteria examined in this study, is resistant by many antibiotics

Scanning Electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, brown spheres) surrounded by cellular debris. MRSA, the bacteria examined in this study, is resistant by many antibiotics. (Wikimedia)

It’s been known for many years that silver in liquid form can kill bacteria and scientists have examined ways to deliver a controlled release of silver nanoparticles at the site of the bone infection. But there has been a lot of concern, including by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), about the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to human cells.

In this study, a team led by Elizabeth Loboa from the University of Missouri instead looked at the use of silver ions which are safer than the nanoparticles. The team developed a three-dimensional cell culture system that resembles bone by growing human bone-forming stem cells on a tissue engineered scaffold, which also slowly releases silver ions.

The researchers stimulated the stem cells within the scaffold to specialize into bone cells and included a strain of bacteria that’s resistant to multiple antibiotics. They found that the silver ions effectively killed the bacteria and at the same time did not block the bone-forming stem cells. If this work holds up, doctors may one day use this silver ion-releasing, biodegradable scaffold to directly treat the area of bone infection. And to help prevent infection after joint replacement procedures, surgeons may rely on implants that are coated with these scaffolds.

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