How the Ice Bucket Challenge changed the fight against ALS

Ice Bucket2

200 people in Boston take the Ice Bucket Challenge: Photo courtesy Forbes

A couple of years ago millions of people did something they probably never thought they would: they dumped a bucket of ice cold water on their head to raise awareness about a disease most of them had probably never heard of, and almost certainly knew very little about.

The disease was ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, and the Ice Bucket Challenge was something that went from a fun idea by a supporter of the ALS Association, to a blockbuster $220 million fundraiser. Like any good idea it sparked a backlash with critics accusing it of being a lazy way for people to feel good without actually doing anything, of diverting money from other charities, and even of just wasting water at a time of drought (at least here in California.)

But two years later we can now look back and see if those critics were correct, and if the money raised did make a difference. And the answer, I’m happy to say, is no and yes. In that order.

An article in the New Yorker magazine, by James Surowiecki, takes a look at what has happened since the Ice Bucket Challenge exploded on the scene and it has some good news:

  • Contributions to the ALS Association remain higher than before the Challenge
  • The average age of donors dropped from 50+ to 35
  • The Challenge may have helped spur an increase in overall donations to charity

All this is, of course, excellent news. But there’s an even more important point, which is that the money raised by the Challenge has helped advance ALS research further and faster than ever before.

Barbara Newhouse, the CEO of the ALS Association told Surowiecki:

“The research environment is dramatically different from what it was. We’re seeing research that’s really moving the needle not just on the causes of the disease but also on treatments and therapies.”

As an example Newhouse cites a study, published in Science  last summer, by researchers at Johns Hopkins that helped explain protein clumps found in the brains of people with ALS. Philip Wong, one of the lead authors of the study, says money raised by the Challenge helped make their work possible;

“Without it, we wouldn’t have been able to come out with the studies as quickly as we did. The funding from the ice bucket is just a component of the whole—in part, it facilitated our effort.”

And just this week the ALS Association said funding from the Challenge helped identify a gene connected to the disease.

Having been one of those who took a dunk for science – and we did ours early on, when the Challenge had only raised $4m – it’s nice to know something as silly and simple can have such a profound impact on developing treatments for a deadly disorder.

 

 

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