Strong ARMing regenerative medicine; bold thoughts on a bright future

It’s a time-honored tradition for the President of the United States to begin his State of the Union speech by saying “The state of our union is strong.” Well, Ed Lanphier, the incoming Chairman of the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM) – the industry trade group – took a leaf out of that book in kicking off the annual “State of the Industry Briefing” in San Francisco yesterday. He said the state of the industry is not just strong, but getting stronger all the time.

ARM_State_of_the_Industry_Briefing_2015_And he had the facts to back him up. In monetary terms alone he said the regenerative medicine field raised $6.3 billion in 2014, compared to $2.3 billion in 2013.

He pointed to the growing number of partnerships and alliances between big pharmaceutical businesses and smaller biotech and cell therapy companies as a sign that deep pocket investors recognize the potential in the field, saying “Big Pharma sees the value of these outcomes and the maturation of these pipelines.”

Lanphier also highlighted the more than 375 clinical trials that were underway last year, and the fact that more than 60 regenerative medicine products have been approved.

But he also pointed out that the field as a whole faces some big challenges in the coming years. One of the most pressing could be pricing. He cited criticisms that exploded over medicines like Gilead’s hepatitis C treatment Sovaldi because of its $1,000-a-day price tag. Lanphier warned that regenerative medicine could face similar criticisms when some of its therapies are finally approved, because they are likely to be very expensive (at least to start with). He said we need to start thinking now how to talk to patients and the public in general about this, so they understand why these treatments are so expensive, but may be cheaper in the long run if they cure rather than just treat disease.

As if to reinforce that message the first panel discussion in the briefing focused on the gene therapy and genome-editing field. Panel members talked about the high expectations for this field in the 1990’s but that it took decades of work before we finally started to see those early hopes turn into reality.

Jeffrey Walsh, the COO of bluebird bio talked about: “The excitement about gene therapy in the early days… and then having to survive the 15-20 years after that in the very challenging days for gene therapy.”

Katrine Bosley, the CEO of Editas Medicine, says those challenges have not gone away and that the field will have to address some big issues in the future. Among those are working with regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to win approval for completely new ways of treating disease. Another is anticipating the kinds of ethical issues they will have to address in using these techniques to alter genes.

Questions about the regulatory process also popped up in the second panel, which focused more on advanced therapy and drug development. Paul Laikind of ViaCyte (whose clinical trial in type 1 diabetes we are funding) highlighted those challenges saying: “Making the cells the way you want is not rocket science; but doing it in a way that meets regulatory requirements is rocket science.”

Paul Wotton, the President and CEO of Ocata Therapeutics (formerly called ACT) echoed those sentiments:

“We are pioneering things here and it’s the pioneers who often end up with arrows in their back, so you really have to spend a lot of time working with the FDA and other regulatory bodies to make sure you are having all the right conversations ahead of time.”

But while everyone freely acknowledged there are challenging times ahead, the mood was still very positive, perhaps best summed up by C. Randal Mills, the President of CEO of CIRM and moderator of the panel, when he said:

“I find it remarkable where we are in this space today – with this number of cutting edge companies in clinical trials. Stem cell therapy is becoming a reality, it’s no longer a place where only a foolish few dare to go in; it’s a reality. There is a change in the practice of medicine that is coming and we are all fortunate to be a part of it.”

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One thought on “Strong ARMing regenerative medicine; bold thoughts on a bright future

  1. You are quoting C. Randal Mills, the President & CEO of CIRM as saying “I find it remarkable where we are in this space today with this number of cutting edge companies in clinical trials”

    Would it be possible to get a quote from C. Randal Mills the President & CEO of CIRM as to why less then 1% of CIRM funding has actually been spent on cutting edge companies in clinical trials or companies at all?

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