Stem cell stories that caught our eye: gene editing tools, lung repair in COPD and big brains

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Correcting the genetic error in sickle-cell disease might be as simple as editing the text.

Correcting the genetic error in sickle-cell disease might be as simple as editing the text [Credit: Nature News].

Review of the many ways to edit defective genes. Nature’s news section did a nice review of the many ways blood-forming stem cells can be genetically altered to correct diseases caused by a single mutation. If you have been following the recently booming field of gene therapy, you may have a hard time keeping all the items in the gene editing toolbox straight. The Nature author provides a rundown on the leading contenders—viral vectors, zinc fingers, TALENs and CRISPRs. Early in the piece she describes why researchers are so excited by the field.

“Although most existing treatments for genetic diseases typically only target symptoms, genetic manipulation or ‘gene therapy’ goes after the cause itself.”

Much of the article talks about work by CIRM grantees. It describes work by Don Kohn at the University of California, Los Angeles, on vectors and zinc fingers, as well as work by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte at the Salk Institute using TALENS and CRISPRs. We explain Kohn’s work treating sickle cell disease in our Fact Sheet.

Getting lungs to repair themselves. A research team at Jackson Labs in Maine has isolated a stem cell in lungs that appears to be able to repair damage left behind by severe infections. They hope to learn enough about how those stem cells work to enlist them to repair damage in diseases like Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

They published the work in Nature and ScienceDaily picked up the lab’s press release. It quotes the lead researcher, Wa Xian on the hope they see down the road for the 12 million people in the U.S. with COPD:

“These patients have few therapeutic options today. We hope that our research could lead to new ways to help them.”

Making middle-man cells more valuable. The University of Wisconsin lab of Jamie Thomson, where human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were first isolated, has found a way to make some of the offspring of those stem cells more valuable.

We have often written that for therapy, the desired cell to start with is not an ESC or even the end desired adult tissue, but rather a middleman cell called a progenitor. But those cells often don’t renew, or replicate themselves, very well in the lab. Ideally researchers would like to have a steady supply of progenitor cells that could be pushed to mature further only when needed. The Thomson lab found that by manipulating a few genes they could arrest the development of progenitors so they constantly renew themselves. ScienceNewsline picked up the press release from the University’s Morgridge Institute that houses the Thomson lab.

Link found to human’s big brains. A CIRM-funded team at the University of California, San Francisco, isolated a protein that seems to be responsible for fostering the large brain size in humans compared with other animals. Human brain stem cells need the protein, dubbed PDGFD, to reproduce.

The team found that the protein acts on parts of the brain that have changed during mammalian evolution. It is not active at all in mice brains, for example. So, if someone accuses you of being a smart aleck just tell them you can’t help it, it’s your PDGFD. HealthCanal ran the university’s press release, which provides a lot more detail of how the protein actually helps give us big heads.

Don Gibbons

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