Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: Perspective on “Walking” Patient, Blood Stem Cells have a Helper and Three Clinical Trials at One Campus

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Some perspective on nasal stem cells and ”walking” patient. PZ Meyers writing on ScienceBlogs did a good job of putting some perspective into the hype in many news outlets about the spinal cord injury patient who was treated with nasal stem cells. He starts out admitting he was “incredulous” that there was anything to the study, but after a thorough reading of the actual journal article he was convinced that there was some real, though modest gain in function for the patient. His conclusion:

“Sad to say, the improvements in the man’s motor and sensory ability are more limited and more realistic than most of the accounts would have you think.”

The research team actually reported on three patients. One got barely noticeable improvement; the patient in the news reports regained about 25 percent of function—which is indisputably a major gain in this population—and the third was somewhere in between.

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Meyer speculated about a reason for the improvements that was left out of most press reports. In addition to the stem cell harvested from the patients’ own nasal passages injected on either side of the injury the team also harvested nerve fibers from the patients legs and transplanted them across the site of the injury. They hoped the nerve strands would act as a bridge for the stem cells to grow and close the gap. It is also possible that being nerve cells they could provide the right cell-to-cell signals directing the nasal stem cells to become nerves. Meyers closed with an appropriate summary:

“I think there’s good reason to be optimistic and see some hope for an effective treatment for serious spinal cord injuries, but right now it has to be a realistic hope — progress has been made. A cure does not exist.”

Body’s own helper for blood stem cells found. In a case of the children ordering around the parents, a team at the Stowers Institute in Kansas City found that one of the progeny of blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow can control the activity of the stem cells. In particular, they were looking at megacarocytes, the relatively rare bone marrow cells that normally produce the blood platelets you need for clotting a wound.

Blood stem cells are the most common stem cell therapy today, but one plagued by our limited ability to control their growth. Knowing this involvement of their offspring gives researcher a new avenue to search for ways to grow the much needed parent stem cells. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News wrote up the findings.

(Yes, I may be the only person in World Series-obsessed San Francisco writing something positive about Kansas City this week.)

Three clinical trails launched at just one campus. We have written individually about three clinical trials that began in the last month at the University of California, San Diego. Now, the university has written a good wrap up of the three trials that got posted to ScienceDaily.

Collectively, the three trials show the breadth of stem cell research starting to reach patients. One trial, for diabetes, uses cells derived from embryonic stem cells encased in a pouch to protect them from immune rejection. Another uses cells derived from fetal nerve stem cells to treat spinal cord injury. And the third involves a drug that targets the cancer stem cells that are believed to cause much of the spread of the disease and resistance to chemotherapy in cancer patients.

CIRM is funding two of the three trials and supported much of the basic science that led to the third. We expect to be funding 10 projects with approved clinical trials by the end of the year. The field is moving.

Don Gibbons

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One thought on “Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: Perspective on “Walking” Patient, Blood Stem Cells have a Helper and Three Clinical Trials at One Campus

  1. It is also important to define “walking”. Many paralyzed people can put on metal body braces and “walk” by heaving themselves forward by upper body strength. However, this is awkward and exhausting, and should by no means be considered a cure. The picture I saw of the person in question appeared to show him in such braces.

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