Stem cell stories that caught our eye: a good review at the NY Times, expanding cord blood and leukemia

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Review paints picture of the field today.
A writer I have respected for many years, Karen Weintraub, wrote a nice review of the current state of stem cell clinical trials in the Tuesday Science Times in the New York Times. She discusses the steady, methodical progress being made:

“Researchers have been slowly learning how to best use stem cells, what types to use and how to deliver them to the body — findings that are not singularly transformational, but progressive and pragmatic.”

She quotes our senior VP Ellen Feigal about the safety seen so far in clinical trials and notes that CIRM should have 10 clinical trials enrolling patients by the end of the year. She also covers the dangers of clinics offering unproven therapies and the power of using iPS-type stem cells to model diseases in the laboratory. Overall, a nicely balanced piece.

Making mitochondrial disease and 3-parent embryos personal. A little newspaper in Oregon called the Willamet Week has published a story that makes the issues around so-called “three-parent” babies very personal. The controversial procedure aims to allow women with rare mitochondrial diseases to have normal children.

Mitochondria, known as the powerhouses of the cell, have the unusual trait of being the only part of the cell besides the nucleus to have any DNA. It is these few genes in the mitochondria that we inherit solely from our mothers because when the DNA from the egg and sperm fuse, the mother’s mitochondria stay in the fluid outside the nucleus. So, to avoid passing along faulty mitochondrial genes, a team in Oregon devised a way to insert the DNA from the mother’s nucleus into a donor egg that had its nucleus removed, a process called nuclear transfer.

Guided by a microscope researchers insert the nucleus from one woman into the egg of another

Guided by a microscope researchers insert the nucleus from one woman into the egg of another

The paper provides a long read—nearly 4,000 words—that goes into great detail about the procedure, the ethics, the research team’s views on the ethics, and the personal story of a patient living with a disease of exhaustion she calls “mitochondrial crash.” The writer lets the patient have the last word on ethics:

“To me it’s win-win because you’re not messing with God’s child. You’re just taking out the bad parts. I don’t want to pick out a blond-haired, blue-eyed tall kid, picking your child’s traits, but to rule out a potentially lethal chronic illness brings in a whole different story.”


Cord blood might now save more adult cancer patients.
Umbilical cord blood is a literal lifesaver for many pediatric cancer patients allowing them to withstand harsh chemotherapy and be rescued by the stem cells in the cord blood. But the procedure is used in few adults because the vast majority of cord blood samples don’t have enough stem cell for an adult requiring the use of two cord samples and doubling the chance for potentially deadly immune reactions.

A team at the University of Montreal screened more than 5,000 molecules looking for one that would let them expand the number of stem cells from one sample in the lab. They hit upon one that they say could allow a 10-fold increase in the number of single cord samples suitable for adults. They expect to begin clinical trials in December.

Science News ran a brief review of the work and the blog Science 2.0 ran the university’s press release with a bit more detail.

Trial begins with cancer drug named for CIRM
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, announced this week that they had begun a clinical trial with leukemia patients using a drug named for our agency cirmtuzumab. This molecule, in the class of drugs called antibodies, disables a protein that cancer stem cells use to accelerate the growth of cancer.

This trial, for patients with recurrence of their chronic lymphocytic leukemia, became the third CIRM funded team this month announcing plans to start clinical trials. In addition to our blog post the San Diego Union Tribune wrote about the latest trial, and we issued press releases on the trials for spinal cord injury and diabetes.

Don Gibbons

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