Creative partnerships that promote progress

Lewis and Clark: great partnerships can change the world

Lewis and Clark: great partnerships can change the world

Having a good partner can turn something good into something truly memorable. Where would Laurel be without Hardy, Lewis without Clark, Butch Cassidy without the Sundance Kid. That’s why the stem cell agency has partnerships on a number of different levels as part of our mission of accelerating the development of stem cell cures to patients with unmet medical needs.

Our latest partnership is with RegMedNet which, in its own words, “provides a unique and unparalleled platform for the regenerative medicine community to share insights, discuss the latest research, and help move the field forward.” With a goal like that why would we not want to support them?

Like us RegMedNet believes that regenerative medicine is going to completely change the way we treat disease, even the way we think about disease. They also believe that progress of the kind we all want is only going to come by bringing together all the key players from the researchers and manufacturers, to the government regulators and, of course, the patient advocates. Each has a vital role to play in moving the field forward and RegMedNet reflects that in both the content it posts online and in the contributors, who represent institutions and companies worldwide.

One of the most important elements in any partnership is understanding, and RegMedNet does a great job of trying to raise awareness about the field, the challenges we all face, and the progress being made. Bringing together so many different perspectives in one spot really helps create a much deeper understanding of regenerative medicine as a whole.

In a few short years regenerative medicine has gone from a relatively small field to a global industry. Our hope is that creating partnerships with like-minded groups around the world, is going to help it get even bigger and, even better.

How one strong ARM can create a community

I spent the last two days at the annual Washington meeting of the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM), the advocacy organization that CIRM became a founding member of in 2009. Having been CIRM’s representative at that first organizing meeting it has been a pleasure to see the organization mature into an effective advocacy group for our field. It has lived up to its goal of creating a community where all the stakeholders in the field, from academic and industry leaders to patient advocates and investors, can come together in a coordinated front.

ARM and CIRM share the goal of accelerating the development of regenerative therapies to patients with unmet medical needs. The organization also dovetails well with our effort to inform the public about the great hope in the field. To quote ARM’s website: “ARM also works to increase public understanding of the field and its potential to transform human healthcare.”

But that transformation can be fostered or impeded by actions in our nation’s capital, both regulatory and legislative, the main thrust of the past two days’ activities.

While the iconic Capitol building is the most recognized footprint of our Congress, it is the House and Senate office buildings that ring three sides of the Capitol where most of the work gets done, like in the Rayburn building, which houses the office of Dianna DeGette, the Colorado congresswoman and champion of regenerative medicine.

While the iconic Capitol building is the most recognized footprint of our Congress, it is the House and Senate office buildings that ring three sides of the Capitol where most of the work gets done, like in the Rayburn building, which houses the office of Dianna DeGette, the Colorado congresswoman and champion of regenerative medicine.

ARM members presented three specific proposals for advancing the field to members of congress and their staffs. These would:

  • Create a center of excellence to develop technical and process standards for regenerative medicine. Not very sexy on the surface, but agreement in advance on what regulators will accept in creating a new product can shave months or years off the development of needed therapies.
  • Create a special pathway within the Food and Drug Administration—much like the one created for orphan diseases—for “Qualified Regenerative Medicine Products (QRMPs). These products would have shown potential to change the course of a disease with currently unmet medical needs and the FDA would be required to meet with their sponsors to discuss expedited review of the product.
  • Advocate for the adoption of a national regenerative medicine strategy that includes federal agency coordination, support for research and regulatory reform to create a clear and predictable pathway that enables quick approval of safe and effective products. To accomplish that ARM has promoted the establishment of a Regenerative Medicine Coordinating Council within the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.
Jamie Goldfarb with her son Kai and husband Jeff. Photo courtesy Melanoma Research Alliance

Jamie Goldfarb with her son Kai and husband Jeff.
Photo courtesy Melanoma Research Alliance

Jamie Goldfarb, who beat back melanoma with the help of a cell-based immune therapy, made a clear and passionate case for the urgency of making it easier to get these therapies to patients at the ARM member dinner Tuesday night:

“Enhanced awareness for the power of regenerative medicine means a world of difference. It means less suffering, less pain, less fear, less expense, less hardship, less loss. It also means more hope, more determination, more love, more strength for individuals and for society as a whole. Every person in this room and those organizations you represent are improving lives.”

Don Gibbons

Regenerative Medicine Takes the Spotlight at this Year’s Largest Biotechnology Convention

BIO logo

It is time to take regenerative medicine seriously. The world’s most inclusive web site for listing clinical trials, clinicaltrials.gov, now has more than 4,000 stem cell trials posted. And the world’s largest biotechnology convention, BIO International, when it kicks off its 2014 edition in San Diego later this month, will include the first ever all-day forum on regenerative medicine—something that has not got much more than a passing nod at previous gatherings.

The BIO leadership asked CIRM to organize the day, and as the principal planner (though with a Y chromosome), I am glad the nine-month gestation is almost over. With the excitement and fear of a soon-to-be new parent I am looking forward to the event Wednesday June 25 at the San Diego Convention Center. I wish I could report that it is open to the public, but it is not. For those who will be at BIO for the week, I hope you will plan to spend that day with us.

We will be presenting five panels with leaders in the field who should provide valuable insights to those new to regenerative medicine as well as those in the thick of trying to accelerate the drive to therapies. Those panels are:

• Regenerative Medicine: Propelling a Paradigm Shift in Medicine and Healthcare Delivery;

• Stem Cells Delivering Results Today as Models of Disease;

• Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, a Great but Challenging Marriage;

• Commercializing a New Therapeutic Modality—Case Studies;

• How International Collaboration Is Accelerating the Field.

These sessions will highlight some of the leading work in California, but also showcase work from around the U.S. and around the world. The speakers will detail the state of the art, but also provide insight into ways their experiences suggest we can accelerate the path to therapies for patients. Finding opportunities to share knowledge gained has always been a central part of CIRM’s mission.

Don Gibbons