Stem cell stories that caught our eye: mini-brains in a dish, blood stem cells and state funded stem cell research

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Great review of brains in a dish. The veteran Associated Press science journalist Malcolm Ritter produced the most thorough overview I have seen of the recent spate of research projects that have grown “mini-brains” in lab dishes. He provides the perspective from the first report in 2013 to a recent, and as he noted, unconfirmed claim of a more complex ball of brain cells.

Alysson Muotri

Alysson Muotri

He uses CIRM grantee Alysson Muotri to discuss the value of modeling diseases with these pea-sized brains. In the case of this University of California, San Diego researcher that involves finding out how nerves in people with autism are different from those in other people. But Ritter does not leave the false impression that these very rudimentary clumps of cells—that each self-organize in slightly different ways—are functioning brains. He makes this point with great quote from Madeline Lancaster of the Medical Research Council in England:

“Lancaster compares the patchwork layout to an airplane that has one wing on top, a propeller at the back, the cockpit on the bottom and a wheel hanging off the side. ‘It can’t actually fly,’ she said. But ‘you can study each of the components individually and learn a lot about them.’”

Ritter also discusses the broader trend of creating various miniature “organoids” in the lab including a quote from CIRM grantee at the University of California, San Francisco, Arnold Kriegstein:

This overall approach “is a major change in the paradigm in terms of doing research with human tissues rather than animal tissues that are substitutes. … It’s truly spectacular.” Organoids “are poised to make a major impact on the understanding of disease, and also human development.”

Unfortunately, this AP piece did not get as broad a pick up as the wire service often achieves. But here is the version from the Seattle Times.

Throw out the textbook on blood stem cells. A new study suggests that the textbook roadmap showing blood stem cells slowly going down various paths to eventually produce specific adult blood cells may be like a faulty GPS system. In this case that voice saying “redirect” is the renown stem cell scientist John Dick of the University of Toronto.

plateletsDick’s research team showed that very early in the process the daughter cell of the stem cell is already committed to a specific adult cell, for instance a red blood cell or a platelet needed for clotting. Low cell counts for one of those cell is the most common cause for patients needing transfusions. Now, with these cell-specific progenitor cells discovered, it may be easier to generate those adult cells for therapy. The discovery will also help the research community better understand many blood disorders.

“Our discovery means we will be able to understand far better a wide variety of human blood disorders and diseases – from anemia, where there are not enough blood cells, to leukemia, where there are too many blood cells,” said Dick in a press release from the University affiliated Princess Margaret Cancer Center. “Think of it as moving from the old world of black-and-white television into the new world of high definition.”

The journal Science published the study today.

The power of states to fund stem cells. The Daily Beast published a good review of state efforts to fund stem cell research with the slightly mischievous title, “George W., Father of Stem-Cell Revolution.” It recounts how several states stepped into the breach after then President George W. Bush restricted stem cell research. The story originally ran in Kaiser Health News under a more subdued headline.

GWBush

The article states that today seven states offer some level of stem cell research funding. And the author asserts that as an engine for generating economic development and local scientific prestige “stem cell research for many states appears to be worth the investment.” We have to agree.

The story does retell some of the early criticisms of CIRM, but goes on to discuss some of our reforms and quotes our new president C. Randal Mills on the “systems-based agency” he is creating:

“We’re setting up continuous paths to move basic research to clinical trials. It’s like a train moving down a track, where each grant is the link to the next step down the line.”

The piece ends with a great forward-looking quote from Jakub Tolar, head of the University of Minnesota’s Stem Cell Institute:

“We started on drugs a hundred years ago. Then we went to monoclonal antibodies—biological. We are now getting ready to use cells as a third way of doing medicine. We are at a historical sweet spot.”

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