Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: Stem Cell Summit Roundup, Spinal Cords in a Dish and Stem Cell Tourism in the NFL

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Success at the World Stem Cell Summit. This week some of the biggest names in regenerative medicine descended upon San Antonio, Texas for the annual summit. Along with researchers from the world’s top universities, institutions and companies were members of CIRM, including CIRM President and CEO C. Randall Mills.

We’ve been publishing top highlights from the Summit all week here on the Stem Cellar. There’s also been detailed coverage in the local San Antonio press, including the local ABC station. And if you’d like to find out more about this year’s conference, be sure to visit @WSCSummit and #WSC14 on Twitter.

Scientists have found a way to grow spinal cords from embryonic stem cells in a petri dish. [Credit: Abigail Tucker/ MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology/ Wellcome Images.]

Scientists have found a way to grow spinal cords from embryonic stem cells in a petri dish. [Credit: Abigail Tucker/ MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology/ Wellcome Images.]

Growing Spinal Cords in the Lab. Tissue engineering, the process of using stem cells to build new tissues and organs, has been the Holy Grail for regenerative medicine. And while there has been some progress with engineering some organs, others—especially the spinal cord—have proven far more difficult. This is because the biodegradable scaffolding cannot be made correctly to grow complex and intricately connected nerve cells.

But now, a research team in Germany has grown complete spinal cords in the lab, pointing to a new strategy for treating those with irreparable spinal cord injuries.

As reported in The Guardian this week, Andrea Meinhardt of the Dresden University of Technology and her colleagues worked around the problem of scaffolding by employing a new method called self-directed morphogenesis, first developed by the late Yoshiki Sasai. According to The Guardian‘s Mo Costandi:

“Self-directed morphogenesis is a method for growing embryonic stem cells in a three-dimensional suspension. Cells grown in this way can, when fed the right combination of signaling molecules, go through the motions of development and organize themselves to form complex tissues such as eyes, glands and bits of brain.”

While preliminary, this research offers immense promise towards the ultimate goal: reversing the devastating effects of spinal cord injuries.

Stem Cells and the NFL. Despite the best efforts of experts, stem cell tourism continues to proliferate. A new study published this week in 2014 World Stem Cell Report (a special supplement to Stem Cells and Development) describes the latest example of people seeking unproven stem cell treatments: this time in the NFL.

New research from Rice University is suggesting that some NFL players are seeking out unproven stem cell treatments—oftentimes traveling abroad without fully understanding the risks. This poses serious problems not only for players but also for the NFL as a whole. As Co-lead author Kirsten Matthews elaborated in a news release:

“With the rise of new and unproven stem cell treatments, the NFL faces a daunting task of trying to better understand and regulate the use of these therapies in order to protect the health of its players.”

Specifically, 12 NFL players are known to have received unproven treatments at some point during the last five years, including star quarterback Peyton Manning who we’ve blogged about before The authors caution that high-profile players broadcasting that they are receiving these unproven therapies could influence regular patients who are also desperate for cures.

In order to fix this growing problem, the authors recommend the NFL review and investigate these unproven stem cell treatments with the help of an independent committee of medical professionals. Finally, they suggest that the NFL could support stem cell research here in the United States—so that proven, effective stem cell-based treatments could more quickly enter the clinic.

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