Of Mice and Men, and Women Too; Stem cell stories you might have missed

Mice brains can teach us a lot

Last week’s news headlines were dominated by one big story, the use of a stem cell transplant to effectively cure a person of HIV. But there were other stories that, while not quite as striking, did also highlight how the field is advancing.

A new way to boost brain cells (in mice!)

It’s hard to fix something if you don’t really know what’s wrong in the first place. It would be like trying to determine why a car is not working just by looking at the hood and not looking inside at the engine. The human brain is far more complex than a car so trying to determine what’s going wrong is infinitely more challenging. But a new study could help give us a new option.

Researchers in Luxembourg and Germany have developed a new computer model for what’s happening inside the brain, identifying what cells are not operating properly, and fixing them.

Antonio del Sol, one of the lead authors of the study – published in the journal Cell – says their new model allows them to identify which stem cells are active and ready to divide, or dormant. 

“Our results constitute an important step towards the implementation of stem cell-based therapies, for instance for neurodegenerative diseases. We were able to show that, with computational models, it is possible to identify the essential features that are characteristic of a specific state of stem cells.”

The work, done in mice, identified a protein that helped keep brain stem cells inactive in older animals. By blocking this protein they were able to help “wake up” those stem cells so they could divide and proliferate and help regenerate the aging brain.

And if it works in mice it must work in people right? Well, that’s what they hope to see next.

Deeper understanding of fetal development

According to the Mayo Clinic between 10 and 20 percent of known pregnancies end in miscarriage (though they admit the real number may be even higher) and our lack of understanding of fetal development makes it hard to understand why. A new study reveals a previously unknown step in this development that could help provide some answers and, hopefully, lead to ways to prevent miscarriages.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden used genetic sequencing to follow the development stages of mice embryos. By sorting those different sequences into a kind of blueprint for what’s happening at every stage of development they were able to identify a previously unknown phase. It’s the time between when the embryo attaches to the uterus and when it begins to turn these embryonic stem cells into identifiable parts of the body.

Qiaolin Deng, Karolinska Institute

Lead researcher Qiaolin Deng says this finding provides vital new evidence.

“Being able to follow the differentiation process of every cell is the Holy Grail of developmental biology. Knowledge of the events and factors that govern the development of the early embryo is indispensable for understanding miscarriages and congenital disease. Around three in every 100 babies are born with fetal malformation caused by faulty cellular differentiation.”

The study is published in the journal Cell Reports.

Could a new drug discovery reduce damage from a heart attack?

Every 40 seconds someone in the US has a heart attack. For many it is fatal but even for those who survive it can lead to long-term damage to the heart that ultimately leads to heart failure. Now British researchers think they may have found a way to reduce that likelihood.

Using stem cells to create human heart muscle tissue in the lab, they identified a protein that is activated after a heart attack or when exposed to stress chemicals. They then identified a drug that can block that protein and, when tested in mice that had experienced a heart attack, they found it could reduce damage to the heart muscle by around 60 percent.

Prof Michael Schneider, the lead researcher on the study, published in Cell Stem Cell, said this could be a game changer.

“There are no existing therapies that directly address the problem of muscle cell death and this would be a revolution in the treatment of heart attacks. One reason why many heart drugs have failed in clinical trials may be that they have not been tested in human cells before the clinic. Using both human cells and animals allows us to be more confident about the molecules we take forward.”

All Things Being (Un)Equal: Scientists Discover Gene that Breaks Traditional Laws of Inheritance

One of the most fundamental laws of biology is about to be turned on its head, according to new research from scientists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine.

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As reported in the journal PLOS Genetics, UNC researchers identified a gene that does not obey traditional laws that determine how genes get passed down from parents to offspring. In experiments on laboratory mice, they found a gene called R2d2 causes female mice to pass on more genetic information than the males did—an observation that appears to contradict principles of genetic inheritance set forth more than a century ago.

As you may (or may not) remember from freshmen biology class, the laws of inheritance were laid down by the 19th century monk Gregor Mendel. Through meticulous observations of his garden’s pea plants, he found that each parent contributes their genetic information equally to their offspring.

But 150 years of scientific discovery later, scientists have discovered that this isn’t always the case.

Instead, in some cases one of the parents will contribute a greater percentage of genetic information than the other, a process called meiotic drive. Scientists had seen evidence of this process occurring in mammals for quite some time, but hadn’t narrowed down the driver of the process to a particular gene. According to UNC researchers, R2d2 is that gene. Senior author Fernando Pardo-Manuel de Villena explains:

“R2d2 is a good example of a poorly understood phenomenon known as female meiotic drive—when an egg is produced and a ‘selfish gene’ is segregated to the egg more than half the time.”

Pardo-Manuel de Villena notes that one example of this process occurs during trisomies—when three chromosomes (two from one parent and one from the other) are passed down to the embryo. The most common trisomy, trisomy 21, is more commonly known as Down Syndrome.

With these findings, Pardo-Manuel de Villena and the team are hoping to gain important insights into the underlying cause of trisomies, as well as the underlying causes for miscarriage—which are often not known.

“Understanding how meiotic drive works may shed light on the … abnormalities underlying these disorders,” said Pardo-Manuel de Villena.

This research was performed in large part by first author John Didion, who first discovered R2d2 when breeding two different types of mice for genetic analysis. Using whole-genome sequencing of thousands of laboratory mice, Didion and his colleagues saw that genes were passed down equally from each mouse’s parents. But a small section, smack dab in the middle of chromosome 2, was different.

Further analysis revealed that this section of chromosome 2 had a disproportionately larger number of genes from the mouse’s mother, compared to its father—showing a clear example of female meiotic drive. And at the heart of it all, Didion discovered, was the R2d2 gene.

The UNC team are already busy diving deeper into the relationship between R2d2 and meiotic drive with a focus on understanding, and one day perhaps correcting, genetic abnormalities in the developing embryo.