It’s time to vote for the Stem Cell Person of the Year

KnoepflerPaul14263

Paul Knoepfler

Oh well, it’s going to be another year of disappointment for me. Not only did I fail to get any Nobel Prize (I figured my blogs might give me a shot at Literature after they gave it to Bob Dylan last year), but I didn’t get a MacArthur Genius Award. Now I find out I haven’t even made the short list for the Stem Cell Person of the Year.

The Stem Cell Person of the Year award is given by UC Davis researcher, avid blogger and CIRM Grantee Paul Knoepfler. (You can vote for the Stem Cell Person of the Year here). In his blog, The Niche, Paul lists the qualities he looks for:

“The Stem Cell Person of the Year Award is an honor I give out to the person in any given year who in my view has had the most positive impact in outside-the-box ways in the stem cell and regenerative medicine field. I’m looking for creative risk-takers.”

“It’s not about who you know, but what you do to help science, medicine, and other people.”

Paul invites people to nominate worthy individuals – this year there are 20 nominees – people vote on which one of the nominees they think should win, and then Paul makes the final decision. Well, it is his blog and he is putting up the $2,000 prize money himself.

This year’s nominees are nothing if not diverse, including

  • Anthony Atala, a pioneering researcher at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina
  • Bao-Ngoc Nguyen, who helped create California’s groundbreaking new law targeting clinics which offer unproven stem cell therapies
  • Judy Roberson, a tireless patient advocate, and supporter of stem cell research for Huntington’s disease

Whoever wins will be following in some big footsteps including patient advocates Ted Harada and Roman Reed, as well as scientists like Jeanne Loring, Masayo Takahashi,  and Elena Cattaneo.

So vote early, vote often.

LINK: Vote for the 2017 Stem Cell Person of the Year

Three stories give us a glimpse of the real possibilities for stem cell therapies

Today we’re featuring a guest blog by Lisa Willemse about the Till and McCulloch Stem Cell Meeting in Canada. Enjoy!

Stem cell treatments should be incredibly easy. Or rather, that’s what some clinics or products would have you believe. Because, on the surface, a one-stop-shop for injectable cells to cure just about any condition or topical creams to peel away the scourge of time are very easy.

Attend one stem cell research conference and you’ll be convinced that it’s much more complicated. It’s a sea of reagents and transcription factors and unknown cause-and-effect. Many researchers will spend their entire career working on just one unknown and their caution and concern when it comes to the notion of a cure is justifiable.

Whistler (Courtesy of Lisa Willemse)

Whistler (Courtesy of Lisa Willemse)

Which makes it all the more impactful when you attend a research conference and hear three talks, back-to-back, that demonstrate that we’re ticking off some of those unknowns and getting much closer to real – not sham – therapies. Therapies with a sound scientific basis that are well planned and done with patient safety (not sales) in mind. Last week’s Till and McCulloch Meetings, held in Whistler, British Columbia gave us a sense of what is possible for three conditions: macular degeneration (vision), septic shock and a rare neurologic disease (Stiff Person Syndrome). Other blogs have covered  different aspects of this meeting here and here.

Vision Repair – Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

As the world’s first clinical trial to use induced pluripotent stem cells launched amid sweeping regulatory changes in Japan, Dr. Masayo Takahashi’s treatment protocol for AMD has received no small amount of scrutiny. After a brief hiatus, the trial was back on track earlier this year and Takahashi’s presentation at this meeting was highly anticipated.

Dr. Masayo Takahashi

Dr. Masayo Takahashi

It did not disappoint. Takahashi spent the better part of her time outlining the steps taken to reach the point where the clinical trial was possible, including multiple studies in mice and further refinement of the treatment to ensure it would be stable in humans even with genetic changes over time. Given that one of the reasons the trial was put on hold was due to genetic mutations found in the cells prepared for the second potential human transplant, Takahashi’s careful work in ensuring the product was safe bodes well for the future of this trial.

The first patient was treated in 2014, a 78-year-old woman with wet AMD in the right eye, and although only minimal visual improvement was documented, the patient anonymously told the Japan Times, “I’m glad I received the treatment. I feel my eyesight has brightened and widened.”

Takahashi also alluded to some of the other challenges she’d had to overcome to make this trial a reality, including would-be critics who told her that the nervous system and the retina were too complicated to regenerate. Takahashi’s response? “You don’t know stem cells [and] you don’t understand the needs of the patient.”

While it was unclear when the next patient will receive treatment, Takahashi did say that three new applications for clinical trials using her refined protocols have been submitted for approval.

Septic shock  

Septic shock is not a condition that gets a lot of attention, most likely because it’s not a primary illness, but a secondary one; a drastic and often fatal immune response that severely reduces blood pressure and cell metabolism. It accounts for 20% of all intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and is the most common cause of non-coronary mortality in the ICU. For those who survive septic shock, there are significant and long-term health consequences.

Over 100 clinical trials have attempted to improve outcomes for patients with septic shock, but not one has been successfully translated into the clinical setting. Supportive care remains the mainstay of therapy.

Dr. Lauralyn McIntyre

Dr. Lauralyn McIntyre

This was the sober backdrop painted by critical care physician, Dr. Lauralyn McIntyre as she began her talk on the world’s first stem cell clinical trial for septic shock she is co-leading in Ottawa with Dr. Duncan Stewart.

Like Takahashi, McIntyre spent a good deal of time explaining the rationale and research that underpin the trial, which takes advantage of the immune-modulating properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (also called mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs) to suppress and reverse the effects of septic shock. This work includes reviews of more than 50 studies that looked at the effects of MSCs in both human trials and animal studies.

McIntyre also discussed research she did with mice in 2010 as a proof-of-concept, where the MSC therapy was delayed for six days. This delay is important as it better simulates the time frame in which most patients arrive in the hospital. As McIntryre pointed out, if the therapy only worked when given within hours of disease development, what good would it be for patients who come in on day six?

Fortunately, the therapy worked in the mice, even after a delayed timeframe, providing a green light for safety testing in humans. The small first human trial is currently underway for nine patients (with a control arm of 21) with results not yet published – although one of the patients shared his experience earlier this year. McIntyre relayed that the early data is very encouraging – enough that the team is moving ahead with a Phase 2 randomized trial in 10 centres across Canada in 2017.

Stiff Person Syndrome

Tina Ceroni’s story is much more personal. She is only the second person in the world to have received an experimental stem cell treatment for Stiff Person Syndrome, a rare neurologic condition that causes uncontrolled and sustained contractions of the arm, leg or other muscles. Often misdiagnosed initially as Multiple Sclerosis or anxiety/depression, SPS is also an autoimmune disease for which the cause is unknown.

Tina Ceroni

Tina Ceroni (The Ottawa Hospital)

I’ve written about Tina’s story before – about how she was hospitalized 47 times in one year and how a chance meeting with another SPS patient propelled Ceroni on a journey that included an intensive stem cell therapy under the guidance of Dr. Harry Atkins at the Ottawa Hospital, in which her blood stem cells were harvested from her bone marrow and used to repopulate her system after her immune system was wiped clean with chemotherapy.

Now a stem cell advocate, Ceroni’s story keeps getting better – not merely in how powerfully and passionately she tells it, but in the continued good health she enjoys after her treatment and in her efforts to share it more broadly.

Most importantly, she drives home a key message:

“My story underscores the importance of clinical trials…. My experience will help to change the future for others. I am living proof that a clinical trial for stem cell therapy can have a life-changing outcome.”

“Often hope is the only medicine we have.”

It’s important that patients like Ceroni continue share their story, not just with the research community to give a human face to the work they do, but to show that solid research is making an impact, one that can be measured in lives saved.


Lisa Willemse

Lisa Willemse

This article is published simultaneously, with permission by the author, Lisa Willemse, on the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine (OIRM) Expression blog.

The New World That iPS Cells Will Bring

A stem cell champion was crowned last month. Dr. Takahashi from the RIKEN center in Japan received the prestigious Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize for developing a human iPS cell therapy to treat a debilitating eye disease called macular degeneration. We wrote about the event held at the Gladstone Institutes in a previous blog and saved the juicy insights from Dr. Takahashi’s scientific presentation and her CIRM-exclusive interview for today.  We also put together a two minute video (see below) based on the interview with her as well as with Dr. Deepak Srivastava, Director of the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and Mr. Hiro Ogawa, a co-founder of the Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize.

Dawn of iPS Cells

As part of the ceremony, Dr. Takahashi gave a scientific talk on the “new world that iPS cells will bring”. She began with a historical overview of stem cell research, starting with embryonic stem cells and the immune rejection and ethical issues associated with their use. She then discussed Dr. Yamanaka’s game-changing discovery of iPS cells, which offered new strategies for disease modeling and potential treatments that avoid some of the issues can complicate embryonic stem cells.

Her excitement over this discovery was palpable as she explained how she immediately jumped into the iPS cell field and got her hands dirty. Knowing that this technology could have huge implications for regenerative medicine and the development of stem cell therapies, she made herself a seemingly unattainable promise. “I said to myself, I will apply iPS cells to humans within five years. And I became a woman of her words.”

An iPS cell world

Dr. Takahashi went on to tell her success story, and why she chose to develop an iPS cell therapy to treat a disease of blindess, age-related macular degeneration (AMD). She explained how AMD is a serious unmet medical need. The current treatment involves injections of an antibody that blocks the activity of a growth factor called VEGF. This factor causes an overgrowth of blood vessels in the eye, which does major damage to the cells in the retina and can cause blindness. This therapy however, is only useful for some forms of AMD not all.

Ogawa_Award_Gladstone-0808

Dr. Masayo Takahashi describing her team’s iPS-based therapy for macular degeneration during the inaugural ceremony for the Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize at The Gladstone Institutes.

She believed she could fix this problem by developing an iPS cell technology that would replace lost cells in the eye in AMD patients. To a captivated crowd, she described how she was able to generate a sheet of human iPS derived cells called retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from a patient with AMD. This sheet was transplanted into the eye of the patient in the first ever iPS cell clinical trial. The transplant was successful and the patient had no adverse effects to the treatment.

While the clinical trial is currently on hold, Dr. Takahashi explained that she and her team learned a lot from this experience. They are currently pursuing additional safety measures for their iPS cell technology to make sure that the stem cell transplants will not cause cancer or other bad outcomes in humans.

Autologous vs. Allogeneic?

Another main topic in her speech, was the choice between using autologous (iPS cells made from a patient and transplanted back into the same patient) and allogeneic (iPS cells made from a donor and then transplanted into a patient) iPS cells for transplantation in humans. Dr. Tahakashi’s opinion was that autologous would be ideal, but not scaleable due to high costs and the amount of time it would take to make iPS cell lines for individual patients.

Plath_iPS2

iPS cells reprogrammed from a woman’s skin. Blue shows nuclei. Green and red indicate proteins found in reprogrammed cells but not in skin cells (credit: Kathrin Plath / UCLA).

Her solution is to use an arsenal of allogeneic iPS cells that can be transplanted into patients without rejection by the immune system. This may be possible if both the donor and the patient share the same combination (called a “haplotype”) of cell surface proteins on their immune cells called human leukocyte antigens (HLA). She highlighted the work ongoing in Japan to generate a stock of HLA haplotype matched iPS cell lines that could be used for most of the Japanese population.

 Changing the regulatory landscape in Japan

It was clear from her talk that her prize winning accomplishments didn’t happen without a lot of blood, sweat, and tears both at the bench and in the regulatory arena. In a CIRM exclusive interview, Dr. Takahashi further explained how her pioneering efforts to bring iPS cells to patients helped revolutionize the regulatory landscape in Japan to make it faster and easier to test iPS cells in the clinic.

The power of iPS cells changed the Japanese [regulatory] law dramatically. We made a new chapter for regenerative medicine in pharmaceutical law. With that law, the steps are very quick for cell therapy. In the new chapter [of the law] … conditional approval will be given if you prove the safety of the cell [therapy]. It’s very difficult to show the efficacy completely in a statistical manner for regenerative medicine. So the law says we don’t have to prove the efficacy [of the therapy] thoroughly with thousands of patients. Only a small number of patients are needed for the conditional approval. That’s the big difference.”

We were curious about Dr. Takahashi’s involvement in getting these regulatory changes to pass, and learned that she played a significant role on the academic side to convince the Japanese ministry to change the laws.

This law was made in the cooperation with the ministry and academia. That was one thing that had never happened before. Academia means mainly the Japanese society for the regenerative medicine, and I’m a committee member of that. So we talked about the ideal law for regenerative medicine, and our society suggested various points to the ministry. And to our surprise, the ministry accepted almost all of the points and included them into the law. That was wonderful. Usually we are very conservative and slow in changing, but this time, I was amazed how quickly the law has been changed. It’s the power of iPS cells.”

The iPS cell future is now

As a champion stem cell scientist and a leader in regenerative medicine, Dr. Takahashi took the opportunity at the end of the event to emphasize that all scientists and clinicians in the iPS cell therapy field need to consider three things: develop safe protocols for generating iPS cells that become standard practice, understand the patient’s needs by focusing on how to benefit patients the most, and think of iPS cells as a treatment and consider the risk when developing these therapies.

The new world of iPS cells is opening doors onto uncharted territory, but Dr. Takahashi’s wise words provide a solid roadmap for the future success of iPS cell therapies.