A visual guide on using stem cells to treat blindness

Some stories are so sweet or powerful or wonderful – or all three – that they just stick in your mind.

Rosalinda Barrero

Rosalinda Barrero

About 18 months ago Rosalinda and German Barrero came to talk to the CIRM Board about retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a devastating genetic disease that slowly destroys a person’s vision. Contrary to what everyone expected to hear, German said that he was grateful that Rosalinda had RP for one reason: that was how he met her! He said he was in his car, waiting to pick someone up when Rosalinda opened his car door and got in. She was apparently waiting to be picked up, and assumed the car that stopped right in front of her was her then boyfriend. It wasn’t her boyfriend. But the man inside, German, eventually became her husband.

You can see Rosalinda and German talking about RP here.

I think of that love story every time I hear about a new treatment or approach to treating RP, hoping that this will be the one that restores Rosalinda’s vision. Right now we are funding one of the most promising of those approaches with Henry Klassen at the University of California, Irvine, using stem cells to replace the cells destroyed by RP.

Klassen’s work is fascinating, and a new whiteboard video by our friends at Youreka Science and Americans for Cures helps explain what he’s trying to do and why this work could not only benefit people like Rosalinda, but others with vision or neurological problems as well.

It’s a simple, wonderfully visual way of leading you along, step-by-step, and explaining complex science in an engaging and, dare I say, fun way.

But the best thing about it, is that it highlights a treatment that could lead to an even happier ending for Rosalinda and German’s story.

By the way, the video was produced as part of the Americans for Cures Foundation’s Report Back to the Public program. For more information check out the Americans for Cures website.


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HIV/AIDS: Progress and Promise of Stem Cell Research

Our friends at Americans for Cures and Youreka Science have done it again. They’ve produced another whiteboard video about the progress and promise of stem cell research that’s so inspiring that it would probably make Darth Vader consider coming back to the light side. This time they tackled HIV.

If you haven’t watched one of these videos already, let me bring you up to speed. Americans for Cures is a non-profit organization, the legacy of the passing of Proposition 71, that supports patient advocates in the fight for stem cell research and cures. They’ve partnered with Youreka Science to produce eye-catching and informative videos to teach patients and the general public about the current state of stem cell research and the quest for cures for major diseases.

Stem cell cure for HIV?

Their latest video is on HIV, a well-known and deadly virus that attacks and disables the human immune system. Currently, 37 million people globally are living with HIV and only a few have been cured.

The video begins with the story of Timothy Brown, also known as the Berlin patient. In 2008 at the age of 40, he was dying of a blood cancer called acute myeloid leukemia and needed a bone marrow stem cell transplant to survive. Timothy was also HIV positive, so his doctor decided to use a bone marrow donor who happened to be naturally resistant to HIV infection. The transplanted donor stem cells were not only successful in curing Timothy of his cancer, but they also “rebooted his immune system” and cured his HIV.

Screen Shot 2015-12-23 at 2.21.18 PMSo why haven’t all HIV patients received this treatment? The video goes on to explain that bone marrow transplants are dangerous and only used in cancer patients who’ve run out of options. Additionally, only a small percentage of the world’s population is resistant to HIV and the chances that one of these individuals is a bone marrow donor match to a patient is very low.

This is where science comes to the rescue. Three research groups in California, all currently supported by CIRM funding, have proposed alternative solutions: they are attempting to make a patient’s own immune system resistant to HIV instead of relying on donor stem cells. Using gene therapy, they are modifying blood stem cells from HIV patients to be HIV resistant, and then transplanting the modified stem cells back into the same patient to rebuild a new immune system that can block HIV infection.

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All three groups have proven their stem cell technology works in animals; two of them are now testing their approach in early phase clinical trials in humans, and one is getting ready to do so. If these trials are successful, there is good reason to hope for an HIV cure and maybe even cures for other immune diseases.

My thoughts…

What I liked most about this video was the very end. It concludes by saying that these accomplishments were made possible not just by funding promising scientific research, but also by the hard work of HIV patients and patient advocate communities, who’ve brought awareness to the disease and influenced policy changes. Ultimately, a cure for HIV will depend on researchers and patient advocates working together to push the pace and to tackle any obstacles that will likely appear with testing stem cell therapies in human clinical trials.

I couldn’t say it any better than the final line of the video:

“We must remember that human trials will celebrate successes, but barriers will surface along with complications and challenges. So patience and understanding of the scientific process are essential.”

Seeing is believing: using video to explain stem cell science

People are visual creatures. So it’s no surprise that many of us learn best through visual means. In fact a study by the Social Science Research Network found that 65 percent of us are visual learners.

That’s why videos are such useful tools in teaching and learning, and that’s why when we came across a new video series called “Reaping the rewards of stem cell research” we were pretty excited. And to be honest there’s an element of self-interest here. The series focuses on letting people know all about the research funded by CIRM.

We didn’t make the videos, a group called Youreka Science is behind them. Nor did we pay for them. That was done by a group called Americans for Cures (the group is headed by Bob Klein who was the driving force behind Proposition 71, the voter-approved initiative that created the stem cell agency). Nonetheless we are happy to help spread the word about them.

The videos are wonderfully simple, involving just an engaging voice, a smart script and some creative artwork on a white board. In this first video they focus on our work in helping fund stem cell therapies for type 1 diabetes.

What is so impressive about the video is its ability to take complex ideas and make them easily understandable. On their website Youreka Science says they have a number of hopes for the videos they produce:

“How empowering would it be for patients to better understand the underlying biology of their disease and learn how new treatments work to fight their illness?

How enlightening would it be for citizens to be part of the discovery process and see their tax dollars at work from the beginning?

How rewarding would it be for scientists to see their research understood and appreciated by the very people that support their work?”

What I love about Youreka Science is that it began almost by chance. A PhD student at the University of California San Francisco was teaching some 5th graders about science and thought it would be really cool to have a way of bringing the textbook to life. So she did. And now we all get to benefit from this delightful approach.