CIRM is looking for talented interns to join our stem cell team!

Are you a person who is excited about the promise of stem cell research and regenerative medicine? Are you also looking to gain valuable work experience in science communications or learn what it’s like to work in human resources (HR)?

Well look no further! CIRM just launched an internship program and is looking for talented students or individuals to join us in our mission of accelerating stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

We currently have two volunteer (unpaid) internship positions open on our communications and HR teams. Interns will work part-time in the CIRM office located in Oakland, California. You can read more about these exciting opportunities below.

Communicate the Awesomeness of Stem Cells

The CIRM communications team is the voice of our Agency. Every day we report our progress towards achieving our mission to patients, scientists, and the public through the CIRM website, social media and our Stem Cellar Blog.

We’re looking for an undergraduate or graduate level student or individual with strong writing skills and an interest in stem cell science and communications. The internship will be part-time (10-15 hours/week in office) for one year with the option for extension. Our awesome intern will provide general support to the CIRM communications team by writing blogs and social media posts about the latest research and clinical trials funded by our Agency. The intern will also help update the CIRM website and create new content for patients and researchers.

If you’re looking to gain valuable experience in science writing and communications this is the internship for you!

Learn About the “Human” in Human Resources

Denise D’Angel

If you ask Denise D’Angel, our rock star Associate Director of Human Resources at CIRM, what she loves most about her job, she will tell you, “I love the human part of HR.” Denise works tirelessly every day to make sure that the CIRM engine of over 40 employees is well-oiled and running efficiently. Overseeing HR at a state agency is no easy task, which is why there is no coincidence that her last name has the word “angel” in it!

As an intern in our HR department, you will gain direct experience in creating job descriptions and questionnaires, learn the standard labor and State of California requirements for jobs, and help design and implement staff training programs.

We’re looking for students or individuals who enjoy working with people in multidisciplinary groups, pay good attention to detail, and have the ability to maintain confidentiality.

Find Out More!

For more detailed descriptions of our internships and application instructions, please visit the CIRM employment website.

Results are in: The Winners of our 2017 #StemCellResolution Campaign

We asked and you answered! In January, we launched our first Stem Cell Resolution campaign to raise awareness about the importance of stem cell research. We challenged scientists, students, institutes and the public to make a #StemCellResolution and share it on social media.

The goal of our campaign was to start a larger conversation about why stem cell research is important not just to advance science but to develop cures for diseases that currently have none.

Our campaign ran for the month of January, and we had global participation on multiple social media platforms including Twitter, Instagram, videos and blogs. Some resolutions involved answering important research questions while others involved empowering the public to pursue and understand scientific evidence to make their own informed decisions about the benefits of stem cell treatments for treating disease.

I was thoroughly impressed with everyone’s enthusiasm towards supporting and sharing this campaign that I plan to hold it again next year. But for now, I’ll announce the winners of our 2017 #StemCellResolution campaign. We picked the most inspiring resolution for each social media category and a few honorable mentions. The winner of each category will receive CIRM Stem Cell Champions t-shirts.

You can view the full list of this year’s stem cell resolutions on our Storify.


Winner: Hamideh Emrani (@HamidehEmrani)

Hamideh is a science and technology communicator and the founder of Emrani Communications. 

Honorable Mention: Christine Liu (@Christineliuart)

Christine is a neuroscience phd student at UC Berkeley and a science communicator and artist.


Winner: Pedro Soria Jr. (@shadowtype)

Pedro is a former CIRM Bridges student who is conducting stem cell research in neural regeneration at Western University in Southern California.

My Stem Cell Resolution for 2017 is to create a social media page dedicated to educating, enlightening and disseminating information about past, current, and future stem cell related studies to the general public, as well as those in science, in order to bring to light the importance of stem cell research. My objective is to bring people together regardless of whether or not they Originate from the natural sciences and spark an interest in this emerging field. Coming from a family where I'm first generation Mexican American and the only scientist has shown me the importance of communication amongst those that have little knowledge of the natural world especially people that come from countries that aren't scientifically advanced. Both my parents are born and raised in Michoacan, Mexico, in a small mountain town called Ario de Rosales. Back in my parents day, most people were farmers that worked from sun rise to sunset in order to feed and provide for their families. Naturally, they had little time for education because of the need to survive but had a positive work ethic, which I was lucky to inherit. My parents came to America for an opportunity to improve their situations and provide for themselves and families back home. They worked so hard to obtain what they have and to give me the chance they never had, which I'm so deeply grateful for each and every day of my life!! I had always felt destined for more than mediocre and enjoy taking on challenges to improve myself mentally, physically and spiritually. As a stem cell scientist, it is my responsibility to share my knowledge with everyone I encounter in order to bring change to this world. I wouldn't be where I am if it weren't for the support of my family, friends, professors, colleagues and of course #CIRM . Please join me on this journey and spread the word to anyone that will listen because we're all on this ride together in one way or another. That is my #stemcellresolution #soriaclan #bringingchange #cellculture Look out for my social media page #cellculture for all your stem cell info and check out the @cirm_stemcells to see what this beautiful institute is doing this year!!! #StemCellResolution

A post shared by Pedro Soria Jr. (@shadowtype) on


Winner: Samantha Yammine (@SamanthaZY)

Samantha Yammine is a science communicator and a PhD candidate in Dr. Derek van der Kooy’s lab at the University of Toronto. You can learn more about Sam and her research on her website. She also recently wrote a guest blog for CIRM about a Keystone stem cell conference that you can find here.

Honorable Mentions: Paul Knoepfler (@pknoepfler)

Paul is a biomedical scientist at UC Davis, a science writer, advocate, and cancer survivor. He writes a popular stem cell blog called the Niche.

Honorable Mention: Catia B (@apulgarita)

Catia is a PhD student at MIT and is conducting research on programming & stem cells. She is originally from Portugal and has a personal blog about traveling and the PhD lifestyle.

Honorable Mention: Gladstone trainees (@Gladstone_GO)

Gladstone students and postdocs stepped up to the challenge and filmed stem cell resolutions about their research.


Winner: Sophie Arthur (@SophArthur)

Soph is a PhD student in Southampton, K studying embryonic stem cell metabolism. Her goal is to find ways to maintain the pluripotent quality of stem cells. She has a personal science communications blog called Soph Talks Science.

 An excerpt from Soph’s blog is below. I highly recommend reading the entire piece as it is very engaging and inspiring!

“For my Stem Cell Resolution – I couldn’t decide on one, so instead, I’ve made 4! Oops!

First, I want to raise awareness that stem cell biology is as important as stem cell treatments! There is lots of hype over stem cell treatments across the globe, but I want to stress that there are only a handful that have actually been approved! I could very well be biased as I’m studying stem cells and their biological mechanisms that exist normally in our bodies – but I want to stress the importance of this work. Simple biology – as I think it will hold the key to all the future stem cell medicine! Once we know how stem cells work in our bodies we can exploit that to make the treatments, or even learn more about our normal development!

 Honorable Mention: Stacey Johnson (@msstaceyerin)

Stacey is the Director of Communications and Marketing for CCRM, the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine in Canada. She also is a regular contributor to CCRM’s Signals Blog.

“Since I’m not a scientist, a student or a patient, but I regularly communicate about stem cells to raise awareness and educate the public, my #stemcellresolution is to use this forum to spread the news – what I do best – about this fun and important challenge.”

Read Stacey’s full blog here.

 Thank you and see you next year!

Science communications is a vital tool that scientists and science enthusiasts need to leverage now more than ever to support stem cell research. Speaking out through social media or blogs is a great way to do this, and I want to congratulate all those that participated this year. I’m grateful for your support!

We look forward to doing this again next year and this time, you’ll have an entire year to ponder your next #StemCellResolution.

What…exactly…do you do? How 12 year olds helped me learn how to talk about science

Jackie Ward in her lab at UC San Diego

Jackie Ward in her lab at UC San Diego

Jackie Ward is a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and received a training grant from CIRM while studying for her PhD. At UCSD Jackie uses stem cells as a model to study rare neurodegenerative diseases in the lab of Albert La Spada. Her work as a PhD student focuses on a rare form of inherited neurodegeneration called spinocerebellar ataxia. From time to time Jackie shares her experiences with us. Here’s her latest.

One of the many questions I get over my annual trek home during the holidays is “What…exactly…do you do?” This is usually couched somewhere between “have you learned to surf yet?” and “how’s the weather?” In the past, I preferred to talk about my surfing skills (very minimal) and the sunshine (always amazing, thanks San Diego), more than what I do every day. It’s amazing how this seemingly innocuous question can be the most difficult to answer. Because we’re used to presenting our work in lecture formats or lengthy scientific papers, summing it up in three sentences of non-jargon can be difficult. A similar thought was outlined recently at UCSD, by the actor and science advocate Alan Alda. The title of his presentation, “Getting the Public Past a Blind Date with Science,” highlighted the uncomfortable feelings many people have towards science. Like any relationship, sustained communication and trust is necessary for success. Unfortunately, on many scientific issues, that relationship has suffered. As a PhD student, I am constantly surrounded by my peers—other scientists who know exactly what I mean when I use terms like “reprogramming” or “retinal photoreceptor.” While these scientist-to-scientist conversations are vital to our work, we often forget that it is equally, or perhaps more, important to have conversations with people who have no idea what we do. As any CIRM- or NIH-funded lab is well aware, a significant portion of our funding comes from taxpayer dollars. It’s these “investors” to whom we ultimately report back. This conversation is challenging. Not only do we have to change our language, we have to remember what it was like to not know everything we do now. The best practice I’ve gotten in this regard is talking to kids. Seventh graders seem to be less afraid to ask you questions or call you out on something that doesn’t make sense to them. (Now that I think about it, it might be beneficial to include some 13-year-olds on our grant review panels.) My graduate program allows students to fulfill their teaching requirement by doing science outreach activities. I chose to do this with the Salk Institute’s mobile science lab, where real scientists are connected to local middle schools to discuss their jobs and lead hands-on science labs. I didn’t realize how valuable this experience was until it started to become easier for me to answer the “what do you do” question. I changed the words I use. I replaced the word “reprogram” with “rewind” and “retinal photoreceptor” with “eye cell.” Unexpectedly, I think this practice helped me become a better communicator when I talk to other scientists now too. I try not to assume a certain level of knowledge with anybody. While I still love talking about pretending to surf and gloating about the weather, I’ve become more fond of the “what do you do” question. I hope to only improve with time. It’ll be my small contribution for getting science to that second date.