Mutation Morphs Mitochondria in Models of Parkinson’s Disease, CIRM-Funded Study Finds

There is no singular cause of Parkinson’s disease, but many—making this disease so difficult to understand and, as a result, treat. But now, researchers at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging have tracked down precisely how a genetic change, or mutation, can lead to a common form of the disease. The results, published last week in the journal Stem Cell Reports, point to new and improved strategies at tackling the underlying processes that lead to Parkinson’s.

Mitochondria from iPSC-derived neurons. On the left is a neuron derived from a healthy individual, while the image on the right shows a neuron derived from someone with the Park2 mutation, the most common mutation in Parkinson's disease (Credit: Akos Gerencser)

Mitochondria from iPSC-derived neurons. On the left is a neuron derived from a healthy individual, while the image on the right shows a neuron derived from someone with the Park2 mutation, the most common mutation in Parkinson’s disease (Credit: Akos Gerencser)

The debilitating symptoms of Parkinson’s—most notably stiffness and tremors that progress over time, making it difficult for patients to walk, write or perform other simple tasks—can in large part be linked to the death of neurons that secrete the hormone dopamine. Studies involving fruit flies in the lab had identified mitochondria, cellular ‘workhorses’ that churn out energy, as a key factor in neuronal death. But this hypothesis had not been tested using human cells.

Now, scientists at the Buck Institute have replicated the process in human cells, with the help of stem cells derived from patients suffering from Parkinson’s, a technique called induced pluripotent stem cell technology, or iPSC technology. These newly developed neurons exactly mimic the disease at the cellular level. This so-called ‘disease in a dish’ is one of the most promising applications of stem cell technology.

“If we can find existing drugs or develop new ones that prevent damage to the mitochondria we would have a potential treatment for PD,” said Dr. Xianmin Zeng, the study’s senior author, in a press release.

And by using this technology, the Buck Institute team confirmed that the same process that occurred in fruit fly cells also occurred in human cells. Specifically, the team found that a particular mutation in these cells, called Park2, altered both the structure and function of mitochondria inside each cell, setting off a chain reaction that leads to the neurons’ inability to produce dopamine and, ultimately, the death of the neuron itself.

This study, which was funded in part by a grant from CIRM, could be critical in the search for a cure for a disease that, as of yet, has none. Current treatment regimens aimed at slowing or reducing symptoms have had some success, but most begin to fail overtime—or come with significant negative side effects. The hope, says Zeng, is that iPSC technology can be the key to fast-tracking promising drugs that can actually target the disease’s underlying causes, and not just their overt symptoms. Hear more from Dr. Xianmin Zeng as she answers your questions about Parkinson’s disease and stem cell research:

Cranking it Up to Eleven: Heightened Growth of Neural Stem Cells Linked to Autism-like Behavior

Autism is not one single disease but a suite of many, which is why researchers have long struggled to understand its underlying causes. Often referred to as the Autism Spectrum Disorders, autism has been linked to multiple genetic and environmental factors—different combinations of which can all result in autism or autistic-like behavior.

Could an unusual boost in neural stem cell growth during pregnancy be linked to autistim-like behavior in children?

Could an unusual boost in neural stem cell growth during pregnancy be linked to autitism-like behavior in children?

But as we first reported in last week’s Weekly Roundup, scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have identified a new factor that can occur during pregnancy and that may be linked to the development of autism-like behavior. These results shed new light on a notoriously murky condition.

UCLA scientist Dr. Harley Kornblum led the study, which was published last week in the journal Stem Cell Reports.

In it, Kornblum and his team describe how inflammation in pregnant mice, known as ‘maternal inflammation’ caused a spike in the production of neural stem cells—cells that one day develop into mature brain cells, such as neurons and glia cells. This abnormal growth, the team argues, led to enlarged brains in the newborn mice and, importantly, autism-like behavior such as decreased vocalization and social behavior, as well as overall increase in anxiety and repetitive behaviors, such as grooming. As Kornblum explained in a news release:

“We have now shown that one way maternal inflammation could result in larger brains and, ultimately, autistic behavior is through the activation of the neural stem cells that reside in the brain of all developing and adult mammals.”

However, Kornblum notes that many environmental factors may cause inflammation during pregnancy—and the inflammation itself is not thought to directly cause autism.

“Autism is a complex group of disorders, with a variety of causes. Our study shows a potential way that maternal inflammation could be one of those contributing factors, even if it is not solely responsible, through interactions with known risk factors.”

These known risk factors include genetic mutations, such as those to a gene called PTEN, which have been shown to increase one’s risk for autism.

Further research by Kornblum’s team further clarified the connection between inflammation and neural stem cell overgrowth. Specifically, they noticed a series of chemical reactions, known as a molecular pathway, appeared to stimulate the growth of neural stem cells in the developing mice. The identification of pathways such as these are vital when exploring new types of therapies—because once you know the pathway’s role in disease, you can then figure out how to change it.

“The discovery of these mechanisms has identified new therapeutic targets for common autism-associated risk factors,” said Dr. Janel Le Belle, the paper’s lead author. “The molecular pathways that are involved in these processes are ones that can be manipulated and possibly even reversed pharmacologically.”

These findings also support previous clinical findings that the roots of autism likely begin in the womb and continue to develop after birth.

One key difference between this work and previous studies, however, was that most studies point to irregularities in the way that neurons are connected as a key factor that leads to autism. This study points to not just a network ‘dysregulation,’ but also perhaps an overabundance of neurons overall.

“Our hypothesis—that one potential means by which autism may develop is through an overproduction of cells in the brain, which then results in altered connectivity—is a new way of thinking about autism.”

Advances in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have given new hope to families caring for autistic loved ones. Read more about one such family in our Stories of Hope series. You can also learn more about how CIRM-funded researchers are building our understanding of autism in our recent video: Reversing Autism in the Lab with help from Stem Cells and the Tooth Fairy.