Boo-Boos and Stem Cells: New Children’s Book Explains Body’s Healing Process

With two boys under six, scraped elbows and knees are a common sight in my household. After the crying and tears subside, the excitement of deciding between the Captain America or the Lightning McQueen band aid soon follows.

The fun part of getting a boo-boo: choosing bandaids

The fun part of getting a boo-boo: choosing bandaids

Over those next several days, my boys get a thrill out of peeking at their boo-boos as they gradually heal. And I get giddy about using their minor injuries as an excuse to tell them about the amazing role stem cells play in helping the body heal. But have you ever tried to discuss the cellular and molecular processes of wound healing and tissue regeneration to little kids? It’s a bit tricky to say the least.

Fortunately, a new resource has come to my rescue. Carlo and the Orange Glasses is an imaginative children’s picture book about a boy who gets a cut on his leg and, with the help of his older sister, learns how his body repairs itself. In the story, Carlo uses a magical pair of glasses, the Zoom3000, that lets him witness his stem cells in action as they help mend his skin. You can read the interactive online book here:

Vanessa de Mello, a PhD student at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, wrote and illustrated the book during an internship at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine (MRC) also in Scotland. The MRC currently hosts Carlo and the Orange Glasses on EuroStemCell, a fabulous website and program whose mission is “to help European citizens make sense of stem cells.”

In a post last week on the EuroStemCell website, de Mello explained her goal for the book:

Vanessa De Mello

Vanessa De Mello

“The book itself is intended for children around the ages of 8-10. Carlo and the Orange Glasses gives an overview of wound healing, definitions of cells, tissues and stem cells in an imaginative way. I hope for the book to be fun, easy to read and pull more young minds into science.”

I put the book to the test by reading it to my almost six-year-old. He really liked the colorful drawings and when I asked him what the book meant to him, he said:

Ezra_StemCellBook-0669 copy

Carlo and the Orange Glasses helped my
5 year old son, Ezra, learn about stem cells.

“Stem cells are the most important cells in your body because they fix
your boo-boos and help you to grow.”

Based on that response, I’d say Vanessa’s book is a smashing success!

I think making this complex scientific concept accessible and entertaining for very young kids is so important. It helps instill an appreciation for science that they’ll carry on to adulthood. Who knows how many will eventually go on to careers in regenerative medicine and stem cell science. But they all have the potential to become stem cell ambassadors to ensure this field fulfills its promise to bring treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

Hands-on science turns kids heads

Making science fun. That was the goal of the Discovery Days event on Saturday in San Francisco, part of the Bay Area Science Festival. If numbers alone are any measure of success they certainly met their goal. The place was packed. But it was more than just the size of the crowd that demonstrated how successful the event was; it was also the makeup and enthusiasm of those there.

Using Play-Doh to explain the wonders of stem cells

Using Play-Doh to explain the wonders of stem cells

For five hours on a beautiful, sunny Saturday – when they could have gone anywhere and done anything – tens of thousands of people, parents and children, chose to come to Discovery Days and immerse themselves in science. And they clearly loved it.

There were more than 150 exhibits to choose from with a wide variety of topics to learn about – everything from climate change and exploring outer space to life in the ocean and everything in between.

In just the small section where the stem cell agency had its booth there were exhibits on DNA and genetics, the power of imagination, and a program designed to encourage more young women to pursue careers in engineering and orthopedics.

Each one chose a different way to engage the crowd, some used fancy high tech tools, others chose more basic approaches. At our booth we used Play-Doh to draw children to us where they could learn about cellular development. It’s always fun to see their eyes widen in amazement when you show them how we all began: as a single, solitary cell. And how that single cell quickly divides into many, eventually making up all the different types of cells that make us human.

The stem cell agency booth at Discovery Days at AT&T Park

The stem cell agency booth at Discovery Days at AT&T Park

The enthusiasm by kids and parents alike was infectious—children racing from one booth to the next, eager to see what each one had in store. Of course the fact that some booths wowed the parents as well as the kids didn’t hurt—but the bottom line was the science and the scientists, showing that it could be fun and fascinating and engaging. While not many parents got into the Play-Doh themselves, they spent considerable time talking with us about the progress in stem cell science.

When you look around and see so many children wearing big goggles, pretending to be scientists, it’s not hard to think of them years later, wearing those same goggles and no longer pretending but actually working as researchers—truly making the world a better place.

And ultimately that was the goal of the event, helping the kids find “something that will unleash their inner scientist.”

Discovery Days; bringing new life to the life sciences

Here are three words you don’t often see strung together: free, science, extravaganza. Yet that’s how Saturday’s Discovery Days at AT&T Park in San Francisco (home of the newly crowned baseball world champion Giants) is being described.

Robots on the rampage at last year's Discovery Days science fair

Robots on the rampage at last year’s Discovery Days science fair

The event truly is a celebration of science. It features more than 150 exhibits on everything from stem cells (that’s us) to rockets and robots and learning how your body and your brain work. It lets you learn about the world through interactive displays, games and experiments that engage and entertain.

Discovery Days is part of the Bay Area Science Festival. The Festival hopes that by making this a fun event it will encourage kids – and that’s the main audience here – to think about pursuing a career in science.

Parents and teachers are an important part of it too. The event gives them both ideas and tools on how to make learning about and teaching science more enjoyable, to help them get young people thinking about science outside the classroom, and to get them to understand that everything they see and do – from throwing a baseball to building a house – involves science.

Engaging the public in science is more than just an academic exercise. In recent years we have seen some fairly sizable cuts in funding for health, medical and scientific research in the US. These cuts are already slowing down our ability to do the research that can lead to new treatments for deadly diseases. Public support for scientific research is essential if we are to stop the cuts and increase funding. Events like Discovery Days can not only educate the public on how fascinating science is, but also how essential public funding for it is.

Bay Area Science Fair logo

So come along tomorrow (November 1) to Discovery Days. The event runs from 11am to 4pm and it’s FREE. It’s at AT&T Park (did I mention that’s the home of the newly crowned champions of baseball, the San Francisco Giants).

Here’s how you can get there