Don’t believe everything you read

(PRNewsfoto/Deseret News)

The Deseret News is Utah’s oldest continuously published daily newspaper. It has a big readership too, with the largest Sunday circulation in the state and the second largest daily circulation. That’s why when they publish paid advertisements that look like serious news articles it can be misleading, even worse.

This week the Deseret News (that’s not a misspelling by the way, the name is taken from the word for honeybee in the Book of Mormon) ran an advertisement written by the East West Health Clinic. The advertisement  is about regenerative medicine and its ability to help repair damaged knee, hip and shoulder joints. It quotes from some well-regarded scientific sources such as WebMD and the National Health Interview Survey.

They also quote CIRM. Here’s what they say:

“In theory, there’s no limit to the types of diseases that could be treated with stem cell research,” the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) explains. CIRM posits that stem cell therapy could be used to “replace virtually any tissue or organ that is injured or diseased.”

That’s from a page on our website that talks about the potential of stem cell research. And it’s all true. But then the advertisement switches quickly, and rather subtly, to talking about what the clinic is doing. And that’s where things get murky.

East West Health offers therapies using umbilical and cord blood that they claim can treat a wide range of diseases and disorders from tendonitis to arthritis and suggest they might even help people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. But none of these have been proven in an FDA-sanctioned clinical trial or approved by the FDA. In fact, if you scroll down to the bottom of the website you find this statement.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA*

And they also say that “Individual results may vary”.

I bet they do.

There are many clinics around the US that claim that stem cells have almost magical powers to heal. They don’t.

What stem cells do have is enormous potential. That’s why we invest in solid, scientifically rigorous research to try and harness that potential and bring it to patients in need. But that takes years of work, meticulous testing in the lab long before it ever is tried in people. It takes working with the FDA to get their support in starting a clinical trial to show that the therapy is both safe and effective.

CIRM has long promoted the importance of the Three R’s, making sure research is regulated, reliable and reputable. We want to help advance promising regenerative medicine therapies and products while protecting patients from the risks posed by unproven interventions.

That’s why we have a commitment to only funding the best science, work that has undergone rigorous peer review. That’s why we collaborate with expert advisors, ensure all projects we fund are in alignment with FDA rules and regulations and that meet the highest standards set by the organizations like the National Institutes of Health.

There are no short cuts. No easy ways to just stick cells in someone and tell them they are good to go.

That’s why when we see advertisements like the one that ran in The Deseret News it concerns us, because people will see our name and think we support the work being done by the people who wrote the piece. We don’t. Quite the opposite.

If you would like to learn more about the kinds of questions you need to ask before signing up for a clinical trial or therapy of any kind just go to our website. And if you want to see the list of clinical trials we do support, you can go here.

The best tools to be the best advocate

It’s hard to do a good job if you don’t have the right tools. And that doesn’t just apply to fixing things around the house, it applies to all aspects of life. So, in launching our new website this week we didn’t just want to provide visitors to the site with a more enjoyable and engaging experience – though we hope we have done that – we also wanted to provide a more informative and helpful experience. That’s why we have created a whole new section call the Patient Advocate Toolbox. shutterstock_150769385

The goal of the Toolbox is simple; to give patients and patient advocates help in learning the skills they need to be as effective as possible about raising awareness for their particular cause.

As an advocate for a disease or condition you may be asked to speak at public events, to be part of a panel discussion at a conference, or to do an interview with a reporter. Each of those requires a particular set of skills, in areas that many of us may have little, if any, experience in.

That’s where the Toolbox comes in. Each section deals with a different opportunity for you to share your story and raise awareness about your cause.

In the section on “Media Interviews”, for example, we walk you through the things you need to think about as you prepare to talk to a reporter; the questions to ask ahead of time, how to prepare a series of key messages, even how to dress if you are going to be on TV. The idea is to break down some of the mystique surrounding the interview, to let you know what to expect and to help you prepare as fully as possible.

If you are going to be asked questions about stem cell research there’s a section in the Toolbox called “Jargon-Free Glossary” that translates scientific terms into every-day English, so you can talk about this work in a way that anyone can understand.

There’s also a really wonderfully visual infographic on the things you need to know when thinking about taking part in a clinical trial. It lays out in simple, easy-to-follow steps the questions you should ask, the potential benefits and problems of being in a trial, including the risks of going overseas for unproven therapies.

The Toolbox is by no means an exhaustive list of all the things you will need to know to be an effective advocate, either for yourself or a friend or loved one, but it is a start.

We would love to hear from you on ways we can improve the content, on other elements that would be useful to include, on links to other sites that you think would be helpful to add. Our goal is to make this as comprehensive and useful as possible. Your support, your ideas and thoughts will help us do just that. If you have any comments please send them to info@cirm.ca.gov

Thomas Carlyle, the Scottish philosopher, once wrote: “Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.” That’s why we want to give you the tools you need to be as effective as you can. Because the more powerful your voice, the more we all benefit.