Stem Cell Roundup: Improving muscle function in muscular dystrophy; Building a better brain; Boosting efficiency in making iPSC’s

Here are the stem cell stories that caught our eye this week.

Photos of the week

TGIF! We’re so excited that the weekend is here that we are sharing not one but TWO amazing stem cell photos of the week.

RMI IntestinalChip

Image caption: Cells of a human intestinal lining, after being placed in an Intestine-Chip, form intestinal folds as they do in the human body. (Photo credit: Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute)

Photo #1 is borrowed from a blog we wrote earlier this week about a new stem cell-based path to personalized medicine. Scientists at Cedars-Sinai are collaborating with a company called Emulate to create intestines-on-a-chip using human stem cells. Their goal is to create 3D-organoids that represent the human gut, grow them on chips, and use these gut-chips to screen for precision medicines that could help patients with intestinal diseases. You can read more about this gut-tastic research here.

Young mouse heart 800x533

Image caption: UCLA scientists used four different fluorescent-colored proteins to determine the origin of cardiomyocytes in mice. (Image credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications)

Photo #2 is another beautiful fluorescent image, this time of a cross-section of a mouse heart. CIRM-funded scientists from UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center are tracking the fate of stem cells in the developing mouse heart in hopes of finding new insights that could lead to stem cell-based therapies for heart attack victims. Their research was published this week in the journal Nature Communications and you can read more about it in a UCLA news release.

Stem cell injection improves muscle function in muscular dystrophy mice

Another study by CIRM-funded Cedars-Sinai scientists came out this week in Stem Cell Reports. They discovered that they could improve muscle function in mice with muscular dystrophy by injecting cardiac progenitor cells into their hearts. The injected cells not only improved heart function in these mice, but also improved muscle function throughout their bodies. The effects were due to the release of microscopic vesicles called exosomes by the injected cells. These cells are currently being used in a CIRM-funded clinical trial by Capricor therapeutics for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

How to build a better brain (blob)

For years stem cell researchers have been looking for ways to create “mini brains”, to better understand how our own brains work and develop new ways to repair damage. So far, the best they have done is to create blobs, clusters of cells that resemble some parts of the brain. But now researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have come up with a new method they think can advance the field.

Their approach is explained in a fascinating article in the journal Science News, where lead researcher Bennet Novitch says finding the right method is like being a chef:

“It’s like making a cake: You have many different ways in which you can do it. There are all sorts of little tricks that people have come up with to overcome some of the common challenges.”

Brain cake. Yum.

A more efficient way to make iPS cells

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Shinya Yamanaka. (Image source: Ko Sasaki, New York Times)

In 2006 Shinya Yamanaka discovered a way to take ordinary adult cells and reprogram them into embryonic-like stem cells that have the ability to turn into any other cell in the body. He called these cells induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSC’s. Since then researchers have been using these iPSC’s to try and develop new treatments for deadly diseases.

There’s been a big problem, however. Making these cells is really tricky and current methods are really inefficient. Out of a batch of, say, 1,000 cells sometimes only one or two are turned into iPSCs. Obviously, this slows down the pace of research.

Now researchers in Colorado have found a way they say dramatically improves on that. The team says it has to do with controlling the precise levels of reprogramming factors and microRNA and…. Well, you can read how they did it in a news release on Eurekalert.

 

 

 

Creating a platform to help transplanted stem cells survive after a heart attack

heart

Developing new tools to repair damaged hearts

Repairing, even reversing, the damage caused by a heart attack is the Holy Grail of stem cell researchers. For years the Grail seemed out of reach because the cells that researchers transplanted into heart attack patients didn’t stick around long enough to do much good. Now researchers at Stanford may have found a way around that problem.

In a heart attack, a blockage cuts off the oxygen supply to muscle cells. Like any part of our body starved off oxygen the muscle cells start to die, and as they do the body responds by creating a layer of scars, effectively walling off the dead tissue from the surviving healthy tissue.  But that scar tissue makes it harder for the heart to effectively and efficiently pump blood around the body. That reduced blood flow has a big impact on a person’s ability to return to a normal life.

In the past, efforts to transplant stem cells into the heart had limited success. Researchers tried pairing the cells with factors called peptides to help boost their odds of surviving. That worked a little better but most of the peptides were also short-lived and weren’t able to make a big difference in the ability of transplanted cells to stick around long enough to help the heart heal.

Slow and steady approach

Now, in a CIRM-funded study published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, a team at Stanford – led by Dr. Joseph Wu – believe they have managed to create a new way of delivering these cells, one that combines them with a slow-release delivery mechanism to increase their chances of success.

The team began by working with a subset of bone marrow cells that had been shown in previous studies to have what are called “pro-survival factors.” Then, working in mice, they identified three peptides that lived longer than other peptides. That was step one.

Step two involved creating a matrix, a kind of supporting scaffold, that would enable the researchers to link the three peptides and combine them with a delivery system they hoped would produce a slow release of pro-survival factors.

Step three was seeing if it worked. Using fluorescent markers, they were able to show, in laboratory tests, that unlinked peptides were rapidly released over two or three days. However, the linked peptides had a much slower release, lasting more than 15 days.

Out of the lab and into animals

While these petri dish experiments looked promising the big question was could this approach work in an animal model and, ultimately, in people. So, the team focused on cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) which have shown potential to help repair damaged hearts, but which also have a low survival rate when transplanted into hearts that have experienced a heart attack.

The team delivered CPCs to the hearts of mice and found the cells without the pro-survival matrix didn’t last long – 80 percent of the cells were gone four days after they were injected, 90 percent were gone by day ten. In contrast the cells on the peptide-infused matrix were found in large numbers up to eight weeks after injection. And the cells didn’t just survive, they also engrafted and activated the heart’s own survival pathways.

Impact on heart

The team then tested to see if the treatment was helping improve heart function. They did echocardiograms and magnetic resonance imaging up to 8 weeks after the transplant surgery and found that the mice treated with the matrix combination had a statistically improved left ventricular function compared to the other mice.

Jayakumar Rajadas, one of the authors on the paper told CIRM that, because the matrix was partly made out of collagen, a substance the FDA has already approved for use in people, this could help in applying for approval to test it in people in the future:

“This paper is the first comprehensive report to demonstrate an FDA-compliant biomaterial to improve stem cell engraftment in the ischemic heart. Importantly, the biomaterial is collagen-based and can be readily tested in humans once regulatory approval is obtained.”