Research Targeting Prostate Cancer Gets Almost $4 Million Support from CIRM

Prostate cancer

A program hoping to supercharge a patient’s own immune system cells to attack and kill a treatment resistant form of prostate cancer was today awarded $3.99 million by the governing Board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)

In the U.S., prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in men.  An estimated 170,000 new cases are diagnosed each year and over 29,000 deaths are estimated in 2018.  Early stage prostate cancer is usually managed by surgery, radiation and/or hormone therapy. However, for men diagnosed with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) these treatments often fail to work and the disease eventually proves fatal.

Poseida Therapeutics will be funded by CIRM to develop genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) to treat metastatic CRPC. In cancer, there is a breakdown in the natural ability of immune T-cells to survey the body and recognize, bind to and kill cancerous cells. Poseida is engineering T cells and T memory stem cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor that arms these cells to more efficiently target, bind to and destroy the cancer cell. Millions of these cells are then grown in the laboratory and then re-infused into the patient. The CAR-T memory stem cells have the potential to persist long-term and kill residual cancer calls.

“This is a promising approach to an incurable disease where patients have few options,” says Maria T. Millan, M.D., President and CEO of CIRM. “The use of chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells has led to impressive results in blood malignancies and a natural extension of this promising approach is to tackle currently untreatable solid malignancies, such as castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer. CIRM is pleased to partner on this program and to add it to its portfolio that involves CAR T memory stem cells.”

Poseida Therapeutics plans to use the funding to complete the late-stage testing needed to apply to the Food and Drug Administration for the go-ahead to start a clinical trial in people.

Quest Awards

The CIRM Board also voted to approve investing $10 million for eight projects under its Discovery Quest Program. The Quest program promotes the discovery of promising new stem cell-based technologies that will be ready to move to the next level, the translational category, within two years, with an ultimate goal of improving patient care.

Among those approved for funding are:

  • Eric Adler at UC San Diego is using genetically modified blood stem cells to treat Danon Disease, a rare and fatal condition that affects the heart
  • Li Gan at the Gladstone Institutes will use induced pluripotent stem cells to develop a therapy for a familial form of dementia
  • Saul Priceman at City of Hope will use CAR-T therapy to develop a treatment for recurrent ovarian cancer

Because the amount of funding for the recommended applications exceeded the money set aside, the Application Subcommittee voted to approve partial funding for two projects, DISC2-11192 and DISC2-11109 and to recommend, at the next full Board meeting in October, that the projects get the remainder of the funds needed to complete their research.

The successful applications are:

 

APPLICATION

 

TITLE

 

INSTITUTION

CIRM COMMITTED FUNDING
DISC2-11131 Genetically Modified Hematopoietic Stem Cells for the

Treatment of Danon Disease

 

 

U.C San Diego

 

$1,393,200

 

DISC2-11157 Preclinical Development of An HSC-Engineered Off-

The-Shelf iNKT Cell Therapy for Cancer

 

 

U.C. Los Angeles

 

$1,404,000

DISC2-11036 Non-viral reprogramming of the endogenous TCRα

locus to direct stem memory T cells against shared

neoantigens in malignant gliomas

 

 

U.C. San Francisco

 

$900,000

DISC2-11175 Therapeutic immune tolerant human islet-like

organoids (HILOs) for Type 1 Diabetes

 

 

Salk Institute

 

$1,637,209

DISC2-11107 Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered Stem/Memory

T Cells for the Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

 

 

City of Hope

 

$1,381,104

DISC2-11165 Develop iPSC-derived microglia to treat progranulin-

deficient Frontotemporal Dementia

 

 

Gladstone Institutes

 

$1,553,923

DISC2-11192 Mesenchymal stem cell extracellular vesicles as

therapy for pulmonary fibrosis

 

 

U.C. San Diego

 

$865,282

DISC2-11109 Regenerative Thymic Tissues as Curative Cell

Therapy for Patients with 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

 

 

Stanford University

 

$865,282

 

 

California gets first royalty check from Stem Cell Agency investments

COH image

CIRM recently shared in a little piece of history. The first royalty check, based on CIRM’s investment in stem cell research, was sent to the California State Treasurer’s office from City of Hope. It’s the first of what we hope will be many such checks, helping repay, not just the investment the state made in the field, but also the trust the voters of California showed when they created CIRM.

The check, for $190,345.87, was for a grant we gave City of Hope back in 2012 to develop a therapy for glioblastoma, one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer. That has led to two clinical trials and a number of offshoot inventions that were subsequently licensed to a company called Mustang Bio.

Christine Brown, who is now the principal investigator on the project, is quoted in a front page article in the San Francisco Chronicle, on the significance of the check for California:

“This is an initial payment for the recognition of the potential of this therapy. If it’s ultimately approved by the FDA as a commercial product, this could be a continued revenue source.”

In the same article, John Zaia, Director of the City of Hope Alpha Stem Cell Clinic, says this also reflects the unique nature of CIRM:

“I think this illustrates that a state agency can actually fund research in the private community and get a return on its investment. It’s something that’s not done in general by other funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, and this is a proof of concept that it can work.”

Maria Millan, CIRM’s President & CEO, says the amount of the payment is not the most significant part of this milestone – after all CIRM has invested more than $2.5 billion in stem cell research since 2004. She says the fact that we are starting to see a return on the investment is important and reflects some of the many benefits CIRM brings to the state.

“It’s a part of the entire picture of the return to California. In terms of what it means to the health of Californians, and access to these transformative treatments, as well as the fact that we are growing an industry.”

 

CIRM-Funded Scientist is Developing a Stem Cell Therapy that Could Cure HIV

Photo Illustration by the Daily Beast

This week, UCLA scientist Scott Kitchen made the news for his efforts to develop a CIRM-funded stem cell gene therapy that could potentially cure patients infected with HIV. Kitchen’s work was profiled in the Daily Beast, which argued that his “research could significantly up survival rates from the virus.”

Scott Kitchen, UCLA Medicine

Kitchen and a team of scientists at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine are genetically modifying blood-forming, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target HIV-infected cells. CARs are protein complexes on the surface of cells that are designed to recognize specific types of cells and are being developed as powerful immunotherapies to fight cancer and HIV infection.

These CAR-expressing HSCs can be transplanted into patients where they develop into immune cells called T cells and natural killer (NK) cells that will destroy cells harboring HIV. This strategy also aims to make patients resistant to HIV because the engineered immune cells will stick around to prevent further HIV infection.

By engineering a patient’s own blood-forming stem cells to produce an unlimited supply of HIV-resistant immune cells that can also eradicate HIV in other cells, Kitchen and his team are creating the possibility for a life-long, functional cure.

Dr. Kelly Shepard, Senior Science Officer of Discovery and Translation Research at CIRM, reflected on significance of Kitchen’s research in an interview:

Kelly Shepard

“This unique approach represents a two-pronged strategy whereby a patient’s own stem cells are engineered not only to be protected from new HIV infection, but also to produce HIV-specific CAR T cells that will seek out and destroy existing and new pools of HIV infection in that patient, ideally leading to a lifelong cure.”

Kitchen and his team are currently testing this stem cell-based CAR-T therapy against HIV in a large-animal model. Their latest findings, which were published recently in the journal PLOS Pathogens, showed that stem cell-derived human CAR T cells were effective at reducing the amount of HIV virus (called the viral load) in their animal-model. They also saw that the CAR T cells survived for more than two years without causing any toxic side effects. This work was funded by an earlier CIRM award led by another CIRM grantee, Dr. Jerome Zack, who is research collaborator of Kitchen’s.

In December 2017, Kitchen received a $1.7 million CIRM Discovery Stage Quest award so that the team can continue to optimize their stem cell CAR T therapy in animal models. Ultimately, they hope to gain insights into how this treatment could be further developed to treat patients with HIV.

Currently, there is no widely available cure for HIV and standard antiretroviral therapies are expensive, difficult for patients to manage and have serious side effects that reduce life expectancy. CIRM has awarded almost $75 million in funding to California scientists focused on developing novel stem cell-based therapies for HIV to address this unmet medical need. Three of these awards support early stage clinical trials, while the rest support earlier stage research projects like Kitchen’s.

CIRM Communications Director, Kevin McCormack, was quoted at the end Daily Beast article explaining CIRM’s strategy for tackling HIV:

“There are a lot of researchers working on developing stem cell therapies for HIV. We fund different approaches because at this stage we don’t know which approach will be most effective, and it may turn out that it’s ultimately a combination of these approaches, or others, that works.”

Harnessing the body’s immune system to tackle cancer

Often on the Stem Cellar we write about work that is in a clinical trial. But getting research to that stage takes years and years of dedicated work. Over the next few months, we are profiling some of the scientists we fund who are doing Discovery (early stage) and Translational (pre-clinical) research, to highlight the importance of this work in developing the treatments that could ultimately save lives. 

This second profile in the series is by Ross Okamura, Ph.D., a science officer in CIRM’s Discovery & Translation Program.

Your immune system is your body’s main protection against disease; harnessing this powerful defense system to target a given disorder is known as immunotherapy.  There are different types of immunotherapies that have been developed over the years. These include vaccines to help generate antibodies against viruses, drugs to direct immune cell function and most recently, the engineering of immune cells to fight cancer.

Understanding How Immunotherapies Work

One of the more recent immunotherapy approaches to fight cancer that has seen rapid development is equipping a subset of immune cells (T cells) with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). In brief, CAR T ceIls are first removed from the patient and then engineered to recognize a specific feature of the targeted cancer cells.  This direct targeting of T cells to the cancer allows for an effective anti-cancer therapy made from your own immune system.

Simplified explanation of how CAR T cell therapies fight cancer. (Memorial Sloan Kettering)

For the first time this fall, two therapeutics employing CAR T cells targeting different types of blood cancers were approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based on remarkable results found during the clinical trials. Specifically, Kymriah (developed by Novartis) was approved for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Yescarta (developed by Kite Pharma) was approved for treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

There are drawbacks to the CAR T approach, however. Revving up the immune system to attack tumors can cause dangerous side effects. When CAR T cells enter the body, they trigger the release of proteins called cytokines, which join in the attack on the tumors. But this can also create what’s referred to as a cytokine storm or cytokine release syndrome (CRS), which can lead to a range of responses, from a mild fever to multi-organ failure and death. Balancing treatments to resolve CRS after it’s detected while still maintaining the treatment’s cancer-killing abilities is a significant challenge that remains to be overcome.  A second issue is that cancer cells can evade the immune system by no longer producing the target that the CAR-T therapy was designed to recognize. When this happens, the patient subsequently experiences a cancer relapse that is no longer treatable by the same cell therapy.

Natural Killer (NK) T cells represent another type of anti-cancer immunotherapy that is also being tested in clinical trials. NK cells are part of the innate immune system responsible for defending your body against both infection and tumor formation.  NK cells target stressed cells by releasing cell-penetrating proteins that poke holes in the cells leading to induced cell death.  As an immunotherapy, NK cells have the potential to avoid both the issues of CRS and cancer cell immune evasion as they release a more limited array of cytokines and do not rely on a specific single target to recognize tumors.  NK cells instead selectively target tumor cells due to the presence of stress-induced proteins on the cancer cells. In addition, the cancer cells lack other proteins that would normally send out a “I’m a healthy cell you can ignore me” message to NK cells. Without that message, NK cells target and kill those cancer cells.

Developing new immunotherapies against cancer

Dan Kaufman, UCSD

Dr. Dan Kaufman of the University of California at San Diego is a physician-scientist whose research group developed a method to produce functional NK cells from human pluripotent stem cells (PSC).  In order to overcome a major hurdle in the use of NK cells as an anti-cancer therapeutic, Dr. Kaufman is exploring using stem cells as a limitless source to produce a scalable, standardized, off-the-shelf product that could treat thousands of patients.  CIRM is currently funding Dr. Kaufman’s work under both a Discovery Quest award and a just recently funded Translational research award in order to try to advance this candidate approach.

In the CIRM Translational award, Dr. Kaufman is looking to cure acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) which in the US has a 5-year survival rate of 27% (National Cancer Institute, 2017) and is estimated to kill over 10,000 individuals this year (American Cancer Society, 2017).  He has previously shown that his stem cell-derived NK cells can kill human cancer cells in a dish and in mouse models, and his goals are to perform preliminary safety studies and to develop a process to scale his production of NK cells to support a clinical trial in people.  Since NK cells don’t require the patient and the donor to be a genetic match to be effective, a bank of PSC-derived NK cells derived from a single donor could potentially treat thousands of patients.

Looking forward, CIRM is also providing Discovery funding to Dr. Kaufman to explore ways to improve his existing approach against leukemia as well as expand the potential of his stem cell-derived NK cell therapeutic by engineering his cells to directly target solid tumors like ovarian cancer.

The field of pluripotent stem cell-based immunotherapies is full of game-changing potential and important innovations like Dr. Kaufman’s are still in the early stages.  CIRM recognizes the importance of supporting early stage research and is currently investing $27.9 million to fund 8 active Discovery and Translation awards in the cancer immunotherapy area.

CIRM-Funded Research Makes Multiple Headlines this Week

When it rains it pours.

This week, multiple CIRM-funded studies appeared in the news, highlighting the exciting progress our Agency is making towards funding innovative stem cell research and promoting the development of promising stem cell therapies for patients.

Below are highlights.


Fate Therapeutics Partners with UC San Diego to Develop Cancer Immunotherapy

Last week, Dr. Dan Kaufman and his team at UC San Diego, received a $5.15 million therapeutic translational research award from CIRM to advance the clinical development of a stem cell-derived immunotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), a rare form of blood cancer.

Today, it was announced that the UCSD team is entering into a research collaboration with a San Diego biopharmaceutical company Fate Therapeutics to develop a related immunotherapy for blood cancers. The therapy consists of immune cells called chimeric antigen receptor-targeted natural killer (CAR NK) cells that can target tumor cells and stop their growth. Fate Therapeutics has developed an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) platform to develop and optimize CAR NK cell therapies targeting various cancers.

According to an article by GenBio, this new partnership is already bearing fruit.

“In preclinical studies using an ovarian cancer xenograft model, Dr. Kaufman and Fate Therapeutics had shown that a single dose of CAR-targeted NK cells derived from iPSCs engineered with the CAR construct significantly inhibited tumor growth and increased survival compared to NK cells containing a CAR construct commonly used for T-cell immunotherapy.”

 


City of Hope Brain Cancer Trial Featured as a Key Trial to Watch in 2018

Xconomy posted a series this week forecasting Key Clinical Data to look out for next year. Today’s part two of the series mentioned a recent CIRM-funded trial for glioblastoma, an aggressive, deadly brain cancer.

Christine Brown and her team at the City of Hope are developing a CAR-T cell therapy that programs a patient’s own immune cells to specifically target and kill cancer cells, including cancer stem cells, in the brain. You can read more about this therapy and the Phase 1 trial on our website.

Alex Lash, Xconomy’s National Biotech Editor, argued that good results for this trial would be a “huge step forward for CAR-T”.

Alex Lash

“While CAR-T has proven its mettle in certain blood cancers, one of the biggest medical questions in biotech is whether the killer cells can also eat up solid tumors, which make up the majority of cancer cases. Glioblastoma—an aggressive and usually incurable brain cancer—is a doozy of a solid tumor.”


ViaCyte Receives Innovative New Product Award for Type 1 Diabetes

Last week, San Diego-based ViaCyte was awarded the “Most Innovative New Product Award” by CONNECT, a start-up accelerator focused on innovation, for its PEC-Direct product candidate. The product is a cell-based therapy that’s currently being tested in a CIRM-funded clinical trial for patients with high-risk type 1 diabetes.

In a company news release published today, ViaCyte’s CEO Paul Laikind commented on what the award signifies,

Paul Laikind

“This award acknowledges how ViaCyte has continually broken new ground in stem cell research, medical device engineering, and cell therapy scaling and manufacturing. With breakthrough technology, clinical stage product candidates, an extensive intellectual property estate, and a strong and dedicated team, ViaCyte has all the pieces to advance a transformative new life-saving approach that could help hundreds of thousands of people with high-risk type 1 diabetes around the world.”

Genetically engineered immune cells melt away deadly brain tumors

MRI scan of patient with glioblastoma tumor. (wikicommons)

MRI scan of patient with glioblastoma. (wikicommons)

Cancers come in many different forms. Some are treatable if caught early and other aren’t. One of the most deadly types of cancers are glioblastomas – a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor.  Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma have an average life expectancy of 12-15 months and there is no cure or effective treatment that extends life.

While a glioblastoma diagnosis has pretty much been a death sentence, now there could be a silver lining to this deadly, fast-paced disease. Last week, scientists from the City of Hope in southern California reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, a new cell-based therapy that melted away brain tumors in a patient with an advanced stage of glioblastoma.

An Immunotherapy Approach to Glioblastoma

The patient is a 50-year-old man named Richard Grady who was participating in an investigational clinical trial run out of the City of Hope’s CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic. A brain scan revealed a brightly lit tumor on the right side of Richard’s brain. Doctors surgically removed the tumor and treated him with radiation in an attempt to staunch further growth. But after six months, the tumors came back with a vengeance, spreading to other parts of his brain, lighting up his MRI scan like a Christmas tree.

With few treatment options and little time left, Richard was enrolled in the City of Hope trial that was testing a cell-based immunotherapy that recognizes and attacks cancer cells. It’s called CAR T-cell therapy – a term that you probably have heard in the news as a promising and cutting-edge treatment for cancer. Scientists extract immune cells, called T-cells, from a patient’s blood and reengineer them in the laboratory to recognize unique surface markers on cancer cells. These specialized CAR T-cells are then put back into the patient to attack and kill off cancer cells.

In Richard’s case, CAR-T cells were first infused into his brain through a tube in an area where a tumor was recently removed. No new tumors grew in that location of his brain, but tumors in other areas continued to grow and spread to his spinal cord. At this point, the scientists decided to place a second tube into a cavity of the brain called the ventricles, which contain a clear liquid called cerebrospinal fluid. Directly infusing into the spinal fluid allowed the cancer fighting cells to travel to different parts of the brain and spinal cord to attack the tumors.

Behnam Badie, senior author on the study and neurosurgery chief at the City of Hope, explained in a news release,

Benham Badie, City of Hope

Benham Badie, City of Hope

“By injecting the reengineered CAR-T cells directly into the tumor site and the ventricles, where the spinal fluid is made, the treatment could be delivered throughout the patient’s brain and also to the spinal cord, where this particular patient had a large metastatic tumor.”

 

Bye Bye Brain Tumors? Almost…

Three infusions of the CAR T-cell treatment shrunk Richard’s tumors noticeably, and a total of ten infusions was enough to melt away Richard’s tumors completely. Amazingly, Richard was able to reduce his medications and go back to work.

TESt

CAR T-cell therapy reduces brain tumors when infused into the spinal fluid. (NEJM)

The effects of the immunotherapy lasted for seven-and-a-half months. Unfortunately, his glioblastoma did come back, and he is now undergoing radiation treatment. Instead of being discouraged by these results, we should be encouraged. Patients with advanced cases of glioblastoma like Richard often have only weeks left to live, and the prospect of another seven months of life with family and friends is a gift.

Following these promising results in a single patient, the City of Hope team has now treated a total of nine patients in their clinical trial. Their initial results indicate that the immunotherapy is relatively safe. Further studies will be done to determine whether this therapy will be effective at treating other types of cancers.

CIRM Alpha Clinics Advance Stem Cell Treatments

The findings in this study are particularly exciting to CIRM, not only because they offer a new treatment option for a deadly brain cancer, but also because the clinical trial testing this treatment is housed at one of our own Alpha Clinics. In 2014, CIRM funded three stem cell-focused clinics at the City of Hope, UC San Diego, and a joint clinic between UC Los Angeles and UC Irvine. These clinics are specialized to support high quality trials focused on stem cell treatments for various diseases. The CIRM team will be bringing a new Alpha Clinics concept plan to its governing Board for approval in February.

Geoff Lomax, Senior Officer of Strategic Infrastructure at CIRM who oversees the CIRM Alpha Clinics, commented on the importance of City of Hope’s glioblastoma trial,

“Treating this form of brain cancer is one of the most vexing challenges in medicine. With the support and expertise of the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic, City of Hope is harnessing the power of patients’ immune cells to treat this deadly disease.”

Neil Littman, CIRM Director of Business Development and Strategic Infrastructure added,

“This study provides important proof-of-concept that CAR-T cells can be used to target hard-to-treat solid tumors and is precisely the type of trial the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Network is designed to support.”

For more details on this study, watch the video below from City of Hope: