Clever technique uncovers role of stem cells in cartilage repair

Over 50 million adults in the U.S. are estimated to be affected by some form of arthritis, a very painful, debilitating condition in which the cartilage that provides cushioning within bone joints gradually degrades. Health care costs of treating arthritis in California alone has been estimated at over $12 billion and that figure is already over a decade old. Unfortunately, the body doesn’t do a good job at healing cartilage in the joint so doctors rely mostly on masking symptoms with pain management therapy and, in severe cases, resorting to surgery.

Illustration of damaged cartilage within an osteoarthritic hip joint Image: Wikipedia/Open Stax

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) – found in bone marrow, fat and blood – give rise to several cell types including cartilage-producing cells called chondrocytes. For that reason, they hold a lot of promise to restore healthy joints for arthritis sufferers. While there is growing evidence that injection of MSCs into joint cartilage is effective, it is still not clear how exactly the stem cells work. Do they take up residence in the cartilage, and give rise to new cartilage production in the joint? Or do they simply release proteins and molecules that stimulate other cells within the joint to restore cartilage? These are important questions to ask when it comes to understanding what tweaks you can make to your cell therapy to optimize its safety and effectiveness. Using some clever genetic engineering techniques in animal models, a research team at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria report this week in JCI Insights that they’ve uncovered an answer.

Tracking the fate of a stem cell treatment after they’ve been injected into an animal, requires the attachment of some sort of “beacon” to the cells. A number of methods exist to accomplish this feat and they all rely on creating transgenic animals engineered to carry a gene that produces a protein label on the cells. For instance, cells from mice or rats engineered to carry the luciferase gene from fireflies, will glow and can be tracked in live animals. So, in this scenario, MSCs from a genetically-engineered donor animal are injected into the joints of a recipient animal which lacks this protein marker. This technique allows the researchers to observe what happens to the labeled cells.

There’s a catch, though. The protein marker carried along with the injected cells is seen as foreign to the immune system of the animal that receives the cells. As a result, the cells will be rejected and destroyed. To get around that problem, the current practice is to use recipient animals bred to have a limited immune response so that the injected cells survive. But solving this problem adds yet another: the immune system plays a key role in the mechanisms of arthritis so removing the effects of it in this experiment will likely lead to misinterpretations of the results.

So, the research team did something clever. They genetically engineered both the donor and recipient mice to carry the same protein marker but with an ever-so-slight difference in their genetic code. The genetic difference in the protein marker was large enough to allow the team to track the donor stem cells in the recipient animals, but similar enough to avoid rejection from the immune system. With all these components of the experiment in place, the researchers were able to show that the MSCs release protein factors to help the body repair its own cartilage damage and not by directly replacing the cartilage-producing cells.

CIRM Board invests in three new stem cell clinical trials targeting arthritis, cancer and deadly infections

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Arthritis of the knee

Every day at CIRM we get calls from people looking for a stem cell therapy to help them fight a life-threatening or life-altering disease or condition. One of the most common calls is about osteoarthritis, a painful condition where the cartilage that helps cushion our joints is worn away, leaving bone to rub on bone. People call asking if we have something, anything, that might be able to help them. Now we do.

At yesterday’s CIRM Board meeting the Independent Citizens’ Oversight Committee or ICOC (the formal title of the Board) awarded almost $8.5 million to the California Institute for Biomedical Research (CALIBR) to test a drug that appears to help the body regenerate cartilage. In preclinical tests the drug, KA34, stimulated mesenchymal stem cells to turn into chondrocytes, the kind of cell found in healthy cartilage. It’s hoped these new cells will replace those killed off by osteoarthritis and repair the damage.

This is a Phase 1 clinical trial where the goal is primarily to make sure this approach is safe in patients. If the treatment also shows hints it’s working – and of course we hope it will – that’s a bonus which will need to be confirmed in later stage, and larger, clinical trials.

From a purely selfish perspective, it will be nice for us to be able to tell callers that we do have a clinical trial underway and are hopeful it could lead to an effective treatment. Right now the only alternatives for many patients are powerful opioids and pain killers, surgery, or turning to clinics that offer unproven stem cell therapies.

Targeting immune system cancer

The CIRM Board also awarded Poseida Therapeutics $19.8 million to target multiple myeloma, using the patient’s own genetically re-engineered stem cells. Multiple myeloma is caused when plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow and are a key part of our immune system, turn cancerous and grow out of control.

As Dr. Maria Millan, CIRM’s President & CEO, said in a news release:

“Multiple myeloma disproportionately affects people over the age of 65 and African Americans, and it leads to progressive bone destruction, severe anemia, infectious complications and kidney and heart damage from abnormal proteins produced by the malignant plasma cells.  Less than half of patients with multiple myeloma live beyond 5 years. Poseida’s technology is seeking to destroy these cancerous myeloma cells with an immunotherapy approach that uses the patient’s own engineered immune system T cells to seek and destroy the myeloma cells.”

In a news release from Poseida, CEO Dr. Eric Ostertag, said the therapy – called P-BCMA-101 – holds a lot of promise:

“P-BCMA-101 is elegantly designed with several key characteristics, including an exceptionally high concentration of stem cell memory T cells which has the potential to significantly improve durability of response to treatment.”

Deadly infections

The third clinical trial funded by the Board yesterday also uses T cells. Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles were awarded $4.8 million for a Phase 1 clinical trial targeting potentially deadly infections in people who have a weakened immune system.

Viruses such as cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr, and adenovirus are commonly found in all of us, but our bodies are usually able to easily fight them off. However, patients with weakened immune systems resulting from chemotherapy, bone marrow or cord blood transplant often lack that ability to combat these viruses and it can prove fatal.

The researchers are taking T cells from healthy donors that have been genetically matched to the patient’s immune system and engineered to fight these viruses. The cells are then transplanted into the patient and will hopefully help boost their immune system’s ability to fight the virus and provide long-term protection.

Whenever you can tell someone who calls you, desperately looking for help, that you have something that might be able to help them, you can hear the relief on the other end of the line. Of course, we explain that these are only early-stage clinical trials and that we don’t know if they’ll work. But for someone who up until that point felt they had no options and, often, no hope, it’s welcome and encouraging news that progress is being made.

 

 

Harnessing DNA as a programmable instruction kit for stem cell function

DNA is the fundamental molecule to all living things. The genetic sequences embedded in its double-helical structure contain the instructions for producing proteins, the building blocks of our cells. When our cells divide, DNA readily unzips into two strands and makes a copy of itself for each new daughter cell. In a Nature Communications report this week, researchers at Northwestern University describe how they have harnessed DNA’s elegant design, which evolved over a billion years ago, to engineer a programmable set of on/off instructions to mimic the dynamic interactions that cells encounter in the body. This nano-sized toolkit could provide a means to better understand stem cell behavior and to develop regenerative therapies to treat a wide range of disorders.

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Instructing cells with programmable DNA-protein hybrids: switching bioactivity on and off Image: Stupp lab/Northwestern U.

While cells are what make up the tissues and organs of our bodies, it’s a bit more complicated than that. Cells also secrete proteins and molecules that form a scaffold between cells called the extracellular matrix. Though it was once thought to be merely structural, it’s clear that the matrix also plays a key role in regulating cell function. It provides a means to position multiple cell signaling molecules in just the right spot at the right time to stimulate a particular cell behavior as well as interactions between cells. This physical connection between the matrix, molecules and cells called a “niche” plays an important role for stem cell function.

Since studying cells in the laboratory involves growing them on plastic petri dishes, researchers have devised many methods for mimicking the niche to get a more accurate picture of how cells response to signals in the body. The tricky part has been to capture three main characteristics of the extracellular matrix all in one experiment; that is, the ability to add and then reverse a signal, to precisely position cell signals and to combine signals to manipulate cell function. That’s where the Northwestern team and its DNA toolkit come into the picture.

They first immobilized a single strand of DNA onto the surface of a material where cells are grown. Then they added a hybrid molecule – they call it “P-DNA” – made up of a particular signaling protein attached to a single strand of DNA that pairs with the immobilized DNA. Once those DNA strands zip together, that tethers the signaling protein to the material where the cells encounter it, effectively “switching on” that protein signal. Adding an excess of single-stranded DNA that doesn’t contain the attached protein, pushes out the P-DNA which can be washed away thereby switching off the protein signal. Then the P-DNA can be added back to restart the signal once again.

Because the DNA sequences can be easily synthesized in the lab, it allows the researchers to program many different instructions to the cells. For instance, combinations of different protein signals can be turned on simultaneously and the length of the DNA strands can precisely control the positioning of cell-protein interactions. The researchers used this system to show that spinal cord neural stem cells, which naturally clump together in neurospheres when grown in a dish, can be instructed to spread out on the dish’s surface and begin specializing into mature brain cells. But when that signal is turned off, the cells ball up together again into the neurospheres.

Team lead Samuel Stupp looks to this reversible, on-demand control of cell activity as means to develop patient specific therapies in the future:

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Samuel Stupp

“People would love to have cell therapies that utilize stem cells derived from their own bodies to regenerate tissue. In principle, this will eventually be possible, but one needs procedures that are effective at expanding and differentiating cells in order to do so. Our technology does that,” he said in a university press release.

 

 

Stories that caught our eye: color me stem cells, delivering cell therapy with nanomagnets, and stem cell decisions

Nanomagnets: the future of targeted stem cell therapies? Your blood vessels are made up of tightly-packed endothelial cells. This barrier poses some big challenges for the delivery of drugs via the blood. While small molecules are able make their way through the small gaps in the blood vessel walls, larger drug molecules, including proteins and cells, are not able to penetrate the vessel to get therapies to diseased areas.

This week, researchers at Rice University report in Nature Communications on an ingenious technique using tiny magnets that may overcome this drug delivery problem.

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At left, the nanoparticles are evenly distributed among the microtubules that help give the cells their shape. At right, after a magnetic field is applied, the nanoparticles are pulled toward one end of the cells and change their shapes. Credit: Laboratory of Biomolecular Engineering and Nanomedicine/Rice University

Initial studies showed that adding magnetic nanoparticles to the endothelial cells and then applying a magnetic field affected the cells’ internal scaffolding, called microtubules. These structures are responsible for maintaining the tight cell to cell connections. The team took the studies a step further by growing the cells in specialized petri dishes containing tiny, tube-shaped channels. Applying a magnetic field to the cells caused the cell-cell junctions to form gaps, making the blood vessel structures leaky. Simply turning off the magnetic field closed up the gaps within a few hours.

Though a lot of research remains, the team aims to apply this on-demand induction of cell leakiness along with adding the magnetic nanoparticles to stem cell therapy products to help target the treatment to specific area. In a press release, team leader Dr. Gang Bao spoke about possible applications to arthritis therapy:

“The problem is how to accumulate therapeutic stem cells around the knee and keep them there. After injecting the nanoparticle-infused cells, we want to put an array of magnets around the knee to attract them.”

To differentiate or not differentiate: new insights During the body’s development, stem cells must differentiate, or specialize, into functional cells – like liver, heart, brain. But once that specialization occurs, the cells lose their pluripotency, or the ability to become any type of cell. So, stem cells must balance the need to differentiate with the need to make copies of itself to maintain an adequate supply of stem cells to complete the development process. And even after a fully formed baby is born, it’s still critical for adult stem cells to balance the need to regenerate damaged tissue versus stashing away a pool of stem cells in various organs for future regeneration and replacement of damaged or diseased tissues.

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Visualizing activation of Nanog gene activity (bright green spot) within cell nucleus. 
Image: Courtesy of Bony De Kumar, Ph.D., and Robb Krumlauf, Ph.D., Stowers Institute for Medical Research

A report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds evidence that the two separate processes – differentiation and pluripotency – directly communicate with each other as way to ensure a proper balance between the two states.

The study, carried out by researchers at Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Missouri, focused on the regulation of two genes: Nanog and Hox. Nanog is critical for maintaining a stem cell’s ability to become a specialized cell type. In fact, it’s one of the four genes initially used to reprogram adult cells back into induced pluripotent stem cells. The Hox gene family is responsible for generating a blueprint of the body plan in a developing embryo. Basically, the pattern of Hox gene activity helps generate the body plan, basically predetermining where the various body parts and organs will form.

Now, both Nanog and Hox proteins act by binding to DNA and turning on a cascade of other genes that ultimately maintain pluripotency or promote differentiation. By examining these other genes, the researchers were surprised to find that both Nanog and Hox were bound to both the pluripotency and differentiation genes. They also found that Nanog and Hox can directly inhibit each other. Taken together, these results suggest that exquisite control of both processes occurs cross regulation of gene activity.

Dr. Robb Krumlauf one of authors on the paper talked about the significance of the result in a press release:

“Over the past 10 to 20 years, biologists have shown that cells are actively assessing their environment, and that they have many fates they can choose. The regulatory loops we’ve found show how the dynamic nature of cells is being maintained.”

Color me stem cells Looking to improve your life and the life of those around you? Then we highly recommend you pay a visit to today’s issue of Right Turn, a regular Friday feature of  Signals, the official blog of CCRM, Canada’s public-private consortium supporting the development of regenerative medicine technologies.

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Collage sample of CCRM’s new coloring sheets. Image: copyright CCRM 2017

As part of an public outreach effort they have created four new coloring sheets that depict stem cells among other sciency topics. They’ve set up a DropBox link to download the pictures so you can get started right away.

Adult coloring has swept the nation as the hippest new pastime. And it’s not just a frivolous activity, as coloring has been shown to have many healthy benefits like reducing stressed and increasing creativity. Just watch any kid who colors. In fact, share these sheet with them, it’s intended for children too.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: new baldness treatments?, novel lung stem cells, and giraffe stem cells

Novel immune system/stem cell interaction may lead to better treatments for baldness. When one thinks of the immune system it’s usually in terms of the body’s ability to fight off a bad cold or flu virus. But a team of UCSF researchers this week report in Cell that a particular cell of the immune system is key to instructing stem cells to maintain hair growth. Their results suggest that the loss of these immune cells, called regulatory T cells (Tregs for short), may be the cause of baldness seen in alopecia areata, a common autoimmune disorder and may even play a role in male pattern baldness.

Alopecia, a common autoimmune disorder that causes baldness. Image: Shutterstock

While most cells of the immune system recognize and kill foreign or dysfunctional cells in our bodies, Tregs act to subdue those cells to avoid collateral damage to perfectly healthy cells. If Tregs become impaired, it can lead to autoimmune disorders in which the body attacks itself.

The UCSF team had previously shown that Tregs allow microorganisms that are beneficial to skin health in mice to avoid the grasp of the immune system. In follow up studies they intended to examine what happens to skin health when Treg cells were inhibited in the skin of the mice. The procedure required shaving away small patches of hair to allow observation of the skin. Over the course of the experiment, the scientists notice something very curious. Team lead Dr. Michael Rosenblum recalled what they saw in a UCSF press release:

“We quickly noticed that the shaved patches of hair never grew back, and we thought, ‘Hmm, now that’s interesting. We realized we had to delve into this further.”

That delving showed that Tregs are located next to hair follicle stem cells. And during the hair growth, the Tregs grow in number and surround the stem cells. Further examination, found that Tregs trigger the stem cells through direct cell to cell interactions. These mechanisms are different than those used for their immune system-inhibiting function.

With these new insights, Dr. Rosenblum hopes this new-found role for Tregs in hair growth may lead to better treatments for Alopecia, one of the most common forms of autoimmune disease.

Novel lung stem cells bring new insights into poorly understood chronic lung disease. Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease that’s characterized by scarring and changes in the structure of tiny blood vessels, or microvessels, within lungs. This so-called “remodeling” of lung tissue hampers the transfer of oxygen from the lung to the blood leading to dangerous symptoms like shortness of breath. Unfortunately, the cause of most cases of pulmonary fibrosis is not understood.

This week, Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers report in the Journal of Clinical Investigation the identification of a new type of lung stem cell that may play a role in lung remodeling.

Susan Majka and Christa Gaskill, and colleagues are studying certain lung stem cells that likely contribute to the pathobiology of chronic lung diseases.  Photo by: Susan Urmy

Up until now, the cells that make up the microvessels were thought to contribute to the detrimental changes to lung tissue in pulmonary fibrosis or other chronic lung diseases. But the Vanderbilt team wasn’t convinced since these microvessel cells were already fully matured and wouldn’t have the ability to carry out the lung remodeling functions.

They had previously isolated stem cells from both mouse and human lung tissue located near microvessels. In this study, they tracked these mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in normal and disease inducing scenarios. The team’s leader, Dr. Susan Majka, summarized the results of this part of the study in a press release:

“When these cells are abnormal, animals develop vasculopathy — a loss of structure in the microvessels and subsequently the lung. They lose the surfaces for gas exchange.”

The team went on to find differences in gene activity in MPCs from healthy versus diseased lungs. They hope to exploit these differences to identify molecules that would provide early warnings of the disease. Dr. Majka explains the importance of these “biomarkers”:

“With pulmonary vascular diseases, by the time a patient has symptoms, there’s already major damage to the microvasculature. Using new biomarkers to detect the disease before symptoms arise would allow for earlier treatment, which could be effective at decreasing progression or even reversing the disease process.”

The happy stem cell story of Mahali the giraffe. We leave you this week with a feel-good story about Mahali, a 14-year old giraffe at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado. Mahali had suffered from chronic arthritis in his front left leg. As a result, he could not move well and was kept isolated from his herd.

Giraffes at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. Photo: Denver Post

The zoo’s head veterinarian, Dr. Liza Dadone, decided to try a stem cell therapy procedure to bring Mahali some relief and a better quality of life. It’s the first time such a treatment would be performed on a giraffe. With the help of doctors at Colorado State University’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 100 million stem cells grown from Mahali’s blood were injected into his arthritic leg.

Before treatment, thermograph shows inflammation (red/yellow) in Mahali’s left front foot (seen at far right of each image); after treatment inflammation resolved (blue/green). Photos: Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

In a written statement to the Colorado Gazette, Dr. Dadone summarized the positive outcome:

“Prior to the procedure, he was favoring his left front leg and would lift that foot off the ground almost once per minute. Since then, Mahali is no longer constantly lifting his left front leg off the ground and has resumed cooperating for hoof care. A few weeks ago, he returned to life with his herd, including yard access. On the thermogram, the marked inflammation up the leg has mostly resolved.”

Now, Dr. Dadone made sure to state that other treatments and medicine were given to Mahali in addition to the stem cell therapy. So, it’s not totally clear to what extent the stem cells contributed to Mahali’s recovery. Maybe future patients will receive stem cells alone to be sure. But for now, we’re just happy for Mahali’s new lease on life.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: spinal cord injury trial keeps pace; SMART cells make cartilage and drugs

CIRM-funded spinal cord injury trial keeping a steady pace

Taking an idea for a stem cell treatment and developing it into a Food and Drug Administration-approved cell therapy is like running the Boston Marathon because it requires incremental progress rather than a quick sprint. Asterias Biotherapeutics continues to keep a steady pace and to hit the proper milestones in its race to develop a stem cell-based treatment for acute spinal cord injury.


Just this week in fact, the company announced an important safety milestone for its CIRM-funded SciStar clinical trial. This trial is testing the safety and effectiveness of AST-OPC1, a human embryonic stem cell-derived cell therapy that aims to regenerate some of the lost movement and feeling resulting from spinal cord injuries to the neck.

Periodically, an independent safety review board called the Data Monitoring Committee (DMC) reviews the clinical trial data to make sure the treatment is safe in patients. That’s exactly what the DMC concluded as its latest review. They recommended that treatments with 10 and 20 million cell doses should continue as planned with newly enrolled clinical trial participants.

About a month ago, Asterias reported that six of the six participants who had received a 10 million cell dose – which is transplanted directly into the spinal cord at the site of injury – have shown improvement in arm, hand and finger function nine months after the treatment. These outcomes are better than what would be expected by spontaneous recovery often observed in patients without stem cell treatment. So, we’re hopeful for further good news later this year when Asterias expects to provide more safety and efficacy data on participants given the 10 million cell dose as well as the 20 million cell dose.

It’s a two-fer: SMART cells that make cartilage and release anti-inflammation drug
“It’s a floor wax!”….“No, it’s a dessert topping!”
“Hey, hey calm down you two. New Shimmer is a floor wax and a dessert topping!”

Those are a few lines from the classic Saturday Night Live skit that I was reminded of when reading about research published yesterday in Stem Cell Reports. The clever study generated stem cells that not only specialize into cartilage tissue that could help repair arthritic joints but the cells also act as a drug dispenser that triggers the release of a protein that dampens inflammation.

Using CRISPR technology, a team of researchers led by Farshid Guilak, PhD, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, rewired stem cells’ genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually could act as a vaccine for arthritis and other chronic conditions. Image: ELLA MARUSHCHENKO

The cells were devised by a research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. They started out with skin cells collected from the tails of mice. Using the induced pluripotent stem cell technique, the skin cells were reprogrammed into an embryonic stem cell-like state. Then came the ingenious steps. The team used the CRISPR gene-editing method to create a negative feedback loop in the cells’ inflammation response. They removed a gene that is activated by the potent inflammatory protein, TNF-alpha and replaced it with a gene that blocks TNF-alpha. Analogous experiments were carried out with another protein called IL-1.

Rheumatoid arthritis often affects the small joints causing painful swelling and disfigurement. Image: Wikipedia

Now, TNF-alpha plays a key role in triggering inflammation in arthritic joints. But this engineered cell, in the presence of TNF-alpha, activates the production of a protein that inhibits the actions of TNF-alpha. Then the team converted these stem cells into cartilage tissue and they went on to show that the cartilage was indeed resistant to inflammation. Pretty smart, huh? In fact, the researchers called them SMART cells for “Stem cells Modified for Autonomous Regenerative Therapy.” First author Dr. Jonathan Brunger summed up the approach succinctly in a press release:

“We hijacked an inflammatory pathway to create cells that produced a protective drug.”

This type of targeted treatment of arthritis would have a huge advantage over current anti-TNF-alpha therapies. Arthritis drugs like Enbrel, Humira and Remicade are very effective but they block the immune response throughout the body which carries an increased risk for serious infections and even cancer.

The team is now testing the cells in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis as well as other inflammation disorders. Those results will be important to determine whether or not this approach can work in a living animal. But senior Dr. Farshid Guilak also has an eye on future applications of SMART cells:

“We believe this strategy also may work for other systems that depend on a feedback loop. In diabetes, for example, it’s possible we could make stem cells that would sense glucose and turn on insulin in response. We are using pluripotent stem cells, so we can make them into any cell type, and with CRISPR, we can remove or insert genes that have the potential to treat many types of disorders.”

License to heal: UC Davis deal looks to advance stem cell treatment for bone loss and arthritis

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Wei Yao and Nancy Lane of UC Davis: Photo courtesy UC Davis

There are many challenges in taking even the most promising stem cell treatment and turning it into a commercial product approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). One of the biggest is expertise. The scientists who develop the therapy may be brilliant in the lab but have little experience or expertise in successfully getting their work through a clinical trial and ultimately to market.

That’s why a team at U.C. Davis has just signed a deal with a startup company to help them move a promising stem cell treatment for arthritis, osteoporosis and fractures out of the lab and into people.

The licensing agreement combines the business acumen of Regenerative Arthritis and Bone Medicine (RABOME) with the scientific chops of the UC Davis team, led by Nancy Lane and Wei Yao.

They plan to test a hybrid molecule called RAB-001 which has shown promise in helping direct mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) – these are cells typically found in the bone marrow and fat tissue – to help stimulate bone growth and increase existing bone mass and strength. This can help heal people suffering from conditions like osteoporosis or hard to heal fractures. RAB-001 has also shown promise in reducing inflammation and so could prove helpful in treating people with inflammatory arthritis.

Overcoming problems

In a news article on the UC Davis website, Wei Yao, said RAB-001 seems to solve a problem that has long puzzled researchers:

“There are many stem cells, even in elderly people, but they do not readily migrate to bone.  Finding a molecule that attaches to stem cells and guides them to the targets we need provides a real breakthrough.”

The UC Davis team already has approval to begin a Phase 1 clinical trial to test this approach on people with osteonecrosis, a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones. CIRM is funding this work.

The RABOME team also hopes to test RAB-001 in clinical trials for healing broken bones, osteoporosis and inflammatory arthritis.

CIRM solution

To help other researchers overcome these same regulatory hurdles in developing stem cell therapies CIRM created the Stem Cell Center with QuintilesIMS, a leading integrated information and technology-enabled healthcare service provider that has deep experience and therapeutic expertise. The Stem Cell Center will help researchers overcome the challenges of manufacturing and testing treatments to meet FDA standards, and then running a clinical trial to test that therapy in people.

Translating great stem cell ideas into effective therapies

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CIRM funds research trying to solve the Alzheimer’s puzzle

In science, there are a lot of terms that could easily mystify people without a research background; “translational” is not one of them. Translational research simply means to take findings from basic research and advance them into something that is ready to be tested in people in a clinical trial.

Yesterday our Governing Board approved $15 million in funding for four projects as part of our Translational Awards program, giving them the funding and support that we hope will ultimately result in them being tested in people.

Those projects use a variety of different approaches in tackling some very different diseases. For example, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco received $5.9 million to develop a new way to help the more than five million Americans battling Alzheimer’s disease. They want to generate brain cells to replace those damaged by Alzheimer’s, using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – an adult cell that has been changed or reprogrammed so that it can then be changed into virtually any other cell in the body.

CIRM’s mission is to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs and Alzheimer’s – which has no cure and no effective long-term treatments – clearly represents an unmet medical need.

Another project approved by the Board is run by a team at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI). They got almost $4.5 million for their research helping people with sickle cell anemia, an inherited blood disorder that causes intense pain, and can result in strokes and organ damage. Sickle cell affects around 100,000 people in the US, mostly African Americans.

The CHORI team wants to use a new gene-editing tool called CRISPR-Cas9 to develop a method of editing the defective gene that causes Sickle Cell, creating a healthy, sickle-free blood supply for patients.

Right now, the only effective long-term treatment for sickle cell disease is a bone marrow transplant, but that requires a patient to have a matched donor – something that is hard to find. Even with a perfect donor the procedure can be risky, carrying with it potentially life-threatening complications. Using the patient’s own blood stem cells to create a therapy would remove those complications and even make it possible to talk about curing the disease.

While damaged cartilage isn’t life-threatening it does have huge quality of life implications for millions of people. Untreated cartilage damage can, over time lead to the degeneration of the joint, arthritis and chronic pain. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) were awarded $2.5 million to develop an off-the-shelf stem cell product that could be used to repair the damage.

The fourth and final award ($2.09 million) went to Ankasa Regenerative Therapeutics, which hopes to create a stem cell therapy for osteonecrosis. This is a painful, progressive disease caused by insufficient blood flow to the bones. Eventually the bones start to rot and die.

As Jonathan Thomas, Chair of the CIRM Board, said in a news release, we are hoping this is just the next step for these programs on their way to helping patients:

“These Translational Awards highlight our goal of creating a pipeline of projects, moving through different stages of research with an ultimate goal of a successful treatment. We are hopeful these projects will be able to use our newly created Stem Cell Center to speed up their progress and pave the way for approval by the FDA for a clinical trial in the next few years.”

Finally a possible use for your excess fat; using it to fix your arthritic knee

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One of the most common questions we get asked at CIRM, almost every other day to be honest, is “are there any stem cell treatments for people with arthritis in their knees?” It’s not surprising. This is a problem that plagues millions of Americans and is one of the leading causes of disability in the US.

Sadly, we have to tell people that there are no stem cell treatments for osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). There’s also a lack of solid evidence from clinical trials that the various approaches are effective.

But that could be changing. There’s a growing number of clinical trials underway looking at different approaches to treating OA in the knee using various forms of stem cells. Sixteen of those are listed at clinicaltrials.gov. And one new study suggests that just one injection of stem cells may be able to help reduce pain and inflammation in arthritic knees, at least for six months. The operative word here being may.

The study, published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine,  used adipose-derived stromal cells, a kind of stem cell taken from the patient’s own fat. Previous studies have shown that these cells can have immune boosting and anti-scarring properties.

The cells were removed by liposuction, so not only did the patient’s get a boost for their knees they also got a little fat reduction. A nice bonus if desired.

The study was quite small. It involved 18 patients, between the ages of 50 and 75, all of whom had suffered from osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee for at least a year before the treatment. This condition is caused by the cartilage in the knee breaking down, allowing bones to rub against each other, leading to pain, stiffness and swelling.

One group of patients were given a low dose of the cells (23,000) injected directly into the knee, one a medium dose (103,000) and one a high dose (503,000).

Over the next six months, the patients were closely followed to see if there were any side effects and, of course, any improvement in their condition. In a news release, Christian Jorgensen, of University Hospital of Montpellier, the director of the study, said the results were encouraging:

“Although this phase I study included a limited number of patients without a placebo arm we were able to show that this innovative treatment was well tolerated in patients with knee OA and it provided encouraging preliminary evidence of efficacy. Interestingly, patients treated with low-dose ASCs significantly improved in pain and function compared with the baseline.”

The researchers caution that the treatment doesn’t halt the progression of OA and does not restore the damaged cartilage, instead it seems to help patients by reducing inflammation.

In a news article about the study Tony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, in Winston-Salem, N.C. and the editor of Stem Cells Translational Medicine said the study offered the patients involved another benefit:

“In fact, most of the patients (in the study group) who had previously scheduled total knee replacement surgery decided to cancel the surgery. It will be interesting to see if these improvements are seen in larger groups of study participants.”

Interesting is an understatement.

But while this is encouraging it’s important to remember it was done in a small group of patients and needs to be replicated in a much larger group before we can draw any solid conclusions. It will also be important to see if the benefits last longer than six months.

We might not have to wait too long for some answers. The researchers are already running a 2-year trial involving 150 people in Europe.

We’ll let you know what they find.

 

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: reducing radiation damage, making good cartilage, watching muscle repair and bar coding cells

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

A bomb blastaStem cells key to reducing radiation damage. With the anniversary of Hiroshima and President Obama’s historic visit to the site all over the news this week, it was nice to read about research that could result in many more people surviving a major radiation event—either from a power plant accident or the unthinkable repeat of history.

Much of the life-threatening damage that occurs early after radiation exposure happens in the gut, so a way to reduce that damage could buy time for other medical care. A team at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has discovered a drug that activates stem cells in the gut, which help maintain a healthy population of crypt cells that can repair gut damage.

A single injection of the small protein drug in mice significantly increased their survival, even if it was given 24 hours after exposure to radiation. The researchers published their work in the journal Laboratory Investigation and in a story written for MedicalNewsToday the lead author, Carla Kantara suggested the role the drug might have:

 “The current results suggest that the peptide may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24 hours after exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach facilities for advanced medical treatment.”

The small protein, or peptide, named TP508, has already been tested in humans for diabetic foot ulcers so could be tested in humans fairly quickly.

 

Making good cartilage for your knees. Rarely a week goes by that I don’t tell a desperate osteoarthritis patient with painful knees that I am treating my own rotten knees with physical therapy until we learn how to use stem cells to make the right kind of cartilage needed for lasting knee repair. So, I was thrilled to read this week that the National Institutes of Health awarded Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland $6.7 million to develop a center to create standardized systems for monitoring stem cells as they convert into cartilage and for evaluating the resulting cartilage.

ear_wakeforest There are a couple problems with existing attempts to use stem cells for knee and other cartilage repair. First not all cartilage is equal and too often stem cells form the soft kind like in your earlobe, not the hard kind needed to protect knees. Also, it has been hard to generate enough cells to replace the entire area that tends to be eroded away in osteoarthritis, one of the leading causes of disability.

The new center, which will be available to researchers anywhere in the world, will develop tools for them to measure four things:

  • which genes are turned on or off as stem cells take the many steps toward becoming various forms of cartilage;
  • predict the best makeup of the extracellular matrix, the support structures outside cells that help them organize as they become a specific tissue;
  • evaluate the biochemical environment around the cells that helps direct their growth;
  • measure the mechanical properties of the resulting cartilage—is it more like the ear or the knee.

NewsWise posted the university’s press release

 

Damaged muscle grabs stem cells.  All our tissues have varying skills in self repair. Muscles generally get pretty high marks in that department, but we don’t really know how they do it. A team at Australia’s Monash University used the transparent Zebra fish and fancy microscopes to actually watch the process.

When they injured mature muscle cells they saw those cells send out projections that actually grabbed nearby muscle stem cells, which regenerated the damaged muscle. They published their findings in Science, the university issued a press release and a news site for Western Australia, WAtoday wrote a story quoting the lead researcher Peter Currie:

 “A significant finding is that the wound site itself plays a pivotal role in coordinating the repair of damaged tissue. If that response could be sped up, we are going to get better, or more timely, regeneration and healing.”

The online publication posted four beautiful florescent images of the cells in action.

 

muscle stem cells Monash

Muscle stem cells in action

“Bar coding” cells points to better transplants.  A team at the University of Southern California, partially funded by CIRM, developed a way genetically “bar code” stem cells so they can be tracked after transplant. In this case they watched the behavior of blood-forming stem cells and found the dose of cells transplanted had a significant impact on what the cells became as they matured.

The general dogma has blood stem cells producing all the various types of cells in our blood system including all the immune cells needed by cancer patients after certain therapies. But the USC tracking showed that only 20 to 30 percent of the stem cells displayed this do-it-all behavior. The type of immune cells created by the remaining 70 to 80 percent varied depending on whether there was a low dose of cells or a high dose, which can be critical to the effectiveness of the transplant.

 “The dose of transplanted bone marrow has strong and lasting effects on how HSCs specialize and coordinate their behavior,” said Rong Lu, senior author, in a USC press release posted by ScienceDaily. “This suggests that altering transplantation dose could be a tool for improving outcomes for patients — promoting bone marrow engraftment, reducing the risk of infection and ultimately saving lives.”