Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Amy Schumer’s MS fundraising; healing traumatic brain injury; schizophrenia iPS insights

Amy Schumer and Paul Shaffer raise money for MS. (Karen Ring)
Two famous individuals, one a comedian/movie star, the other a well-known musician, have combined forces to raise money for an important cause. Amy Schumer and Paul Shaffer have pledged to raise $2.5 million dollars to help support research into multiple sclerosis (MS). This disease affects the nerve cells in both the brain and spinal cord. It eats away at the protective myelin sheaths that coat and protect nerve cells and allow them to relay signals between the brain and the rest of the body. As a result, patients experience a wide range of symptoms including physical, mental and psychiatric problems.

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Comedian Amy Schumer and her Dad who has MS.
(National MS Society)

The jury is still out on the exact cause of MS and there is no cure available. But the Tisch MS Research Center of New York is trying to change that. It is “dedicated to finding the cause and cure for MS” and recently announced, at its annual Future Without MS Gala, that it has pledged to raise $10 million to fund the stem cell research efforts ongoing at the Center. Currently, Tisch is “the only center with an FDA approved stem cell clinical trial for MS in the United States.” You can read more about this clinical trial, which is transplanting mesenchymal stem cell-derived brain progenitor cells into the spinal cord, on the Tisch website.

At the gala, both Amy Schumer and Paul Shaffer were present to show their support for MS research. In an interview with People magazine, Amy revealed that her father struggles with MS. She explained, “Some days he’s really good and he’s with it and we’re joking around. And some days I go to visit my dad and it’s so painful. I can’t believe it.” Her experience watching her dad battle with MS inspired her to write and star in the movie TRAINWRECK, and also to get involved in supporting MS research. “If I can help at all I’m gonna try, even if that means I’ll get hurt,” she said.

Stem cells may help traumatic brain injuries (Kevin McCormack
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a huge problem in the US. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention around 1.7 million Americans suffer a TBI every year; 250,000 of those are serious enough to result in a hospitalization; 52,000 are fatal. Even those who survive a TBI are often left with permanent disabilities, caused by swelling in the brain that destroys brain cells.

Now researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston say using a person’s own stem cells could help reduce the severity of a TBI.

The study, published in the journal Stem Cells, found that taking stem cells from a person’s own bone marrow and then re-infusing them into the bloodstream, within 48 hours of the injury, can help reduce the swelling and inflammation that damages the brain.

In an interview with the Houston Chronicle Charles Cox, the lead researcher – and a member of CIRM’s Grants Working Group panel of experts – says the results are not a cure but they are encouraging:

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Charles Cox
(Drew Donovan / UTHealth)

“I’m talking about the difference between someone who recovers to the point that they can take care of themselves, and someone who is totally dependent on someone else for even simple tasks, like using the bathroom and bathing. That’s a dramatic difference.”

Schizophrenia: an imbalance of brain cell types?

Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disorder with a wide range of disabling symptoms such as delusional thoughts, hearing voices, anxiety and an inability to experience pleasure. It’s estimated that half of those with schizophrenia abuse drugs and alcohol, which likely contributes to increased incidence of unemployment, homelessness and suicide. No cure exists for the disorder because scientists don’t fully understand what causes it, and available treatments only mask the symptoms.

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A patient’s artistic representation of living with schizophrenia
(Wikipedia)

This week, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan reported new clues about what goes wrong at a cellular and molecular level in the brains of people with schizophrenia. The scientists created induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from healthy donors, as well as patients with schizophrenia, and then changed or specialized them into nerve cells, or neurons. They found that fewer iPSCs developed into neurons when comparing the cells from people with schizophrenia to the healthy donor cells. Instead, more iPSCs specialized into astrocytes, another type of brain cell. This fewer neurons/more astrocytes shift was also seen in brains of deceased donors who had schizophrenia.

Looking inside the cells, the researchers found higher levels of a protein called p38 in the neurons derived from the people with schizophrenia. Inhibiting the activity of p38 led to increased number of neurons and fewer astrocytes, which resembles the healthy state. These results, published in Translational Psychiatry and picked up by Health Canal, point to inhibitors of p38 activity as a potential path for developing new treatments.

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