Disease in a Dish – That’s a Mouthful: Using Human Stem Cells to Find ALS Treatments

Saying “let’s put some shrimp on the barbie” will whet an Australian’s appetite for barbequed prawns but for an American it conjures up an odd image of placing shrimp on a Barbie doll. This sort of word play confusion doesn’t just happen across continents but also between scientists and the public.

Take “disease in a dish” for example. To a stem cell scientist, this phrase right away describes a powerful way to study human disease in the lab using a Nobel Prize winning technique called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). But to a non-scientist it sounds like a scene from some disgusting sci-fi horror cooking show.

Our latest video Disease in a Dish: That’s a Mouthful takes a lighthearted approach to help clear up any head scratching over this phrase. Although it’s injected with humor, the video focuses on a dreadful disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, it’s a disorder in which nerve cells that control muscle movement die. There are no effective treatments and it’s always fatal, usually within 3 to 5 years after diagnosis.

To explain disease in a dish, the video summarizes a Science Translation Medicine publication of CIRM-funded research reported by the laboratory of Robert Baloh, M.D., Ph.D., director of Cedars-Sinai’s multidisciplinary ALS Program. In the study, skin cells from patients with an inherited form of ALS were used to create nerve cells in a petri dish that exhibit the same genetic defects found in the neurons of ALS patients. With this disease in a dish, the team identified a possible cause of the disease: the cells overproduce molecules causing a toxic buildup that affects neuron function. The researchers devised a way to block the toxic buildup, which may point to a new therapeutic strategy.

In a press release, Clive Svendsen, Ph.D., a co-author on the publication and director of the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute had this perspective on the results:

“ALS may be the cruelest, most severe neurological disease, but I believe the stem cell approach used in this collaborative effort holds the key to unlocking the mysteries of this and other devastating disorders.”

The video is the pilot episode of Stem Cells in Your Face, which we hope will be an ongoing informational series that helps explain the latest advances toward stem cell-based therapies.

For more information about CIRM-funded ALS research, visit our ALS fact sheet.

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