One-Time, Lasting Treatment for Sickle Cell Disease May be on Horizon, According to New CIRM-Funded Study

For the nearly 1,000 babies born each year in the United States with sickle cell disease, a painful and arduous road awaits them. The only cure is to find a bone marrow donor—an exceedingly rare proposition. Instead, the standard treatment for this inherited blood disorder is regular blood transfusions, with repeated hospitalizations to deal with complications of the disease. And even then, life expectancy is less than 40 years old.

In Sickle Cell Disease, the misshapen red blood cells cause painful blood clots and a host of other complications.

In Sickle Cell Disease, the misshapen red blood cells cause painful blood clots and a host of other complications.

But now, scientists at UCLA are offering up a potentially superior alternative: a new method of gene therapy that can correct the genetic mutation that causes sickle cell disease—and thus help the body on its way to generate normal, healthy blood cells for the rest of the patient’s life. The study, funded in part by CIRM and reported in the journal Blood, offers a great alternative to developing a functional cure for sickle cell disease. The UCLA team is about to begin a clinical trial with another gene therapy method, so they—and their patients—will now have two shots on goal in their effort to cure the disease.

Though sickle cell disease causes dangerous changes to a patient’s entire blood supply, it is caused by one single genetic mutation in the beta-globin gene—altering the shape of the red blood cells from round and soft to pointed and hard, thus resembling a ‘sickle’ shape for which the disease is named. But the UCLA team, led by Donald Kohn, has now developed two methods that can correct the harmful mutation. As he explained in a UCLA news release about the newest technique:

“[These results] suggest the future direction for treating genetic diseases will be by correcting the specific mutation in a patient’s genetic code. Since sickle cell disease was the first human genetic disease where we understood the fundamental gene defect, and since everyone with sickle cell has the exact same mutation in the beta-globin gene, it is a great target for this gene correction method.”

The latest gene correction technique used by the team uses special enzymes, called zinc-finger nucleases, to literally cut out and remove the harmful mutation, replacing it with a corrected version. Here, Kohn and his team collected bone marrow stem cells from individuals with sickle cell disease. These bone marrow stem cells would normally give rise to sickle-shaped red blood cells. But in this study, the team zapped them with the zinc-finger nucleases in order to correct the mutation.

Then, the researchers implanted these corrected cells into laboratory mice. Much to their amazement, the implanted cells began to replicate—into normal, healthy red blood cells.

Kohn and his team worked with Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. to design the zinc-finger nucleases that specifically targeted and cut the sickle-cell mutation. The next steps will involve improving the efficiency and safest of this method in pre-clinical animal models, before moving into clinical trials.

“This is a promising first step in showing that gene correction has the potential to help patients with sickle cell disease,” said UCLA graduate student Megan Hoban, the study’s first author. “The study data provide the foundational evidence that the method is viable.”

This isn’t the first disease for which Kohn’s team has made significant strides in gene therapy to cure blood disorders. Just last year, the team announced a promising clinical trial to cure Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Syndrome, also known as SCID or “Bubble Baby Disease,” by correcting the genetic mutation that causes it.

While this current study still requires more research before moving into clinical trials, Kohn and his team announced last month that their other gene therapy method, also funded by CIRM, has been approved to start clinical trials. Kohn argues that it’s vital to explore all promising treatment options for this devastating condition:

“Finding varied ways to conduct stem cell gene therapies is important because not every treatment will work for every patient. Both methods could end up being viable approaches to providing one-time, lasting treatments for sickle cell disease and could also be applied to the treatment of a large number of other genetic diseases.”

Find Out More:
Read first-hand about Sickle Cell Disease in our Stories of Hope series.
Watch Donald Kohn speak to CIRM’s governing Board about his research.

Heroic three-year study reveals safe methods for growing clinical-grade stem cells

Imagine seeking out the ideal pancake recipe: should you include sugar or no sugar? How about bleached vs. unbleached flour? Baking power or baking soda? When to flip the pancake on the skillet? You really have to test out many parameters to get that perfectly delicious light and fluffy pancake.

Essentially that’s what a CIRM-funded research team from both The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and UC San Diego accomplished but instead of making pancakes they were growing stem cells in the lab. In a heroic effect, they spent nearly three years systematically testing out different recipes and found conditions that should be safest for stem cell-based therapies in people. Their findings were reported today in PLOS ONE.

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Pluripotent stem cells. Courtesy of Andres Bratt-Leal from Jeanne Loring’s laboratory.

Let’s step back a bit in this story. If you’re a frequent reader of The Stem Cellar you know that one of the reasons stem cells are such an exciting field of biology is their pluripotency. That is, these nondescript cells have the capacity to become any type of cell in the body (pluri= many; potency = potential). This is true for embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent cells (iPS). Several clinical trials underway or in development aim to harness this shape-shifting property to return insulin producing cells to people living with diabetes or to restore damaged nerves in victims of spinal cord injury, to name just two examples.

The other defining feature of pluripotent stem cell is their ability to make copies of themselves and grow indefinitely on petri dishes in the laboratory. As they multiply, the cells eventually take up all the real estate on the petri dish. If left alone the cells exhaust their liquid nutrients and die. So the cells must regularly be “passaged”; that is, removed from the dish and split into more dishes to provide new space to grow. This is also necessary for growing up enough quantities of cells for transplantation in people.

Previous small scale studies have observed that particular recipes for growing pluripotent cells can lead to genetic instability, such as deletion or duplication of DNA, that is linked with cancerous growth and tumor formation. This is perhaps the biggest worry about stem cell-based transplantation treatments: that they may cure disease but also cause cancer.

To find the conditions that minimize this genetic instability, the research team embarked on the first large-scale systematic study of the effects of various combinations of cell growth methods. One of the senior authors Louise Laurent, assistant professor at UC San Diego, explained in a press release the importance of this meticulous, quality control study:

“The processes used to maintain and expand stem cell cultures for cell replacement therapies needs to be improved, and the resulting cells carefully tested before use.”

To seek the ideal recipe, the team tested several parameters. For example, they grew some cells on top of so-called “feeder cells”, which help the stem cells grow while other cells used feeder-free conditions. Two different passaging methods were examined: one uses an enzyme solution to strip the cells off the petri dish while in the other method the cells are manually removed. Different liquid nutrients for the cell were included in the study as well. The different combinations of cells were grown continuously through 100 passages and changes in their genetic stability were periodically analyzed along the way.

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Jeanne Loring (above) is professor of developmental neurobiology at TSRI and senior author of the study with Louise Laurent of the University of California, San Diego.

The long-term experiment paid off: the team found that the stem cells grown on feeder free petri dishes and passaged using the enzyme solution accumulated more genetic abnormalities than cells grown on feeder cells and passaged manually. The team also observed genetic changes after many cells passages. In particular, a recurring deletion of a gene called TP53. This gene is responsible for making a protein that acts to suppress cancers. So without this suppressor, later cell passages have the danger of becoming cancerous.

Based on these results, the other senior author, Jeanne Loring, a professor of developmental neurobiology at TSRI, gave this succinct advice:

“If you want to preserve the integrity of the genome, then grow your cells under those conditions with feeder cells and manual passaging. Also, analyze your cells—it’s really easy.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; progress toward artificial brain, teeth may help the blind and obesity

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

More progress toward artificial brain. A team at the RIKEN Institute in Japan has used stem cells in a 3-D culture to create brain tissue more complex than prior efforts and from an area of the brain not produced before, the cerebellum—that lobe at the lower back of the brain that controls motor function and attention. As far back as 2008, a RIKEN team had created simple tissue that mimicked the cortex, the large surface area that controls memory and language.

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The Inquisitr web portal wrote a feature on a wide variety of efforts to create an artificial brain teeing off of this week’s publication of the cerebellum work in Cell Reports. The piece is fairly comprehensive covering computerized efforts to give robots intelligence and Europe’s Human Brain Project that is trying to map all the activity of the brain as a starting point for recapitulating it in the lab.

The experts interviewed included Robert Caplan of Tufts University in Massachusetts who is using 3-D scaffolding to build functional brain tissues that can process electrical signals. He is not planning any Frankenstein moments; he hopes to create models to improve understanding of brain diseases.

“Ideally we would like to have a laboratory brain system that recapitulates the most devastating diseases. We want to be able to take our existing toolkit of drugs and understand how they work instead of using trial and error.”

Teeth eyed as source of help for the blind. Today the European Union announced the first approval of a stem cell therapy for blindness. And already yesterday a team at the University of Pittsburg announced they had developed a new method to use stem cells to restore vision that could expand the number of patients who could benefit from stem cell therapy.

Many people have lost part or all their vision due to damage to the cornea on the surface of their eye. Even when they can gain vision back through a corneal transplant, their immune system often rejects the new tissue. So the ideal would be making new corneal tissue from the patient’s own cells. The Italian company that garnered the EU approval does this in patients by harvesting some of their own cornea-specific stem cells, called limbal stem cells. But this is only an option if only one eye is impacted by the damage.

The Pittsburgh team thinks it may have found an unlikely alternative source of limbal cells: the dental pulp taken from teeth that have be extracted. It is not as far fetched at it sounds on the surface. Teeth and the cornea both develop in the same section of the embryo, the cranial neural crest. So, they have a common lineage.

The researchers first treated the pulp cells with a solution that makes them turn into the type of cells found in the cornea. Then they created a fiber scaffold shaped like a cornea and seeded the cells on it. Many steps remain before people give up a tooth to regain their sight, but this first milestone points the way and was described in a press release from the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, which was picked up by the web site ClinicaSpace.

CIRM funds a project that also proposes to use the patient’s own limbal stem cells but using methods more likely to gain approval of the Food and Drug Administration than those used by the Italian company.

Stem cells and the fight against obesity. Of the two types of stem cells found in your bone marrow, one can form bone and cartilage and, all too often, fat. Preventing these stem cells from maturing into fat may be a tool in the fight against obesity according to a team at Queen Mary University of London.

The conversion of stem cells to fat seems to involve the cilia, or hair-like projections found on cells. When the cilia lengthen the stem cells progress toward becoming fat. But if the researchers genetically prevented that lengthening, they stopped the conversion to fat cells. The findings opens several different ways to think about understanding and curbing obesity says Melis Dalbay one of the authors of the study in a university press release picked up by ScienceNewsline.

“This is the first time that it has been shown that subtle changes in primary cilia structure can influence the differentiation of stem cells into fat. Since primary cilia length can be influenced by various factors including pharmaceuticals, inflammation and even mechanical forces, this study provides new insight into the regulation of fat cell formation and obesity.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: new ways to reprogram, shifting attitudes on tissue donation, and hockey legend’s miracle questioned

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Insulin-producing cells produced from skin. Starting with human skin cells a team at the University of Iowa has created iPS-type stem cells through genetic reprogramming and matured those stem cells into insulin-producing cells that successfully brought blood-sugar levels closer to normal when transplanted in mice.

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left). [Credit: University of Iowa]

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left).
[Credit: University of Iowa]

The cells did not completely restore blood-sugar levels to normal, but did point to the possibility of achieving that goal in the future, something the team leader Nicholas Zavazava noted in an article in the Des Moines Register, calling the work an “encouraging first step” toward a potential cure for diabetes.

The Register discussed the possibility of making personalized cells that match the genetics of the patient and avoiding the need for immune suppression. This has long been a goal with iPS cells, but increasingly the research community has turned to looking for options that would avoid immune rejection with donor cells that could be off-the-shelf and less expensive than making new cells for each patient.

Heart cells from reprogramming work in mice. Like several other teams, a group in Japan created beating heart cells from iPS-type stem cells. But they went the additional step of growing them into sheets of heart muscle that when transplanted into mice integrated into the animals own heart and beat to the same rhythm.

The team published the work in Cell Transplantation and the news agency AlianzaNews ran a story noting that it has previously been unclear if these cells would get in sync with the host heart muscle. The result provides hope this could be a route to repair hearts damaged by heart attack.

Patient attitudes on donating tissue. A University of Michigan study suggests most folks don’t care how you use body tissue they donate for research if you ask them about research generically. But their attitudes change when you ask about specific research, with positive responses increasing for only one type of research: stem cell research.

On the generic question, 69 percent said go for it, but when you mentioned the possibility of abortion research more than half said no and if told the cells might lead to commercial products 45 percent said nix. The team published their work in the Journal of the American Medical Association and HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release that quoted the lead researcher, Tom Tomlinson, on why paying attention to donor preference is so critical:

“Biobanks are becoming more and more important to health research, so it’s important to understand these concerns and how transparent these facilities need to be in the research they support.”

CIRM has begun building a bank of iPS-type stem cells made from tissue donated by people with one of 11 diseases. We went through a very detailed process to develop uniform informed consent forms to make sure the donors for our cell bank knew exactly how their cells could be used. Read more about the consent process here.

Mainstream media start to question hockey legend’s miracle. Finally some healthy skepticism has arrived. Hockey legend Gordie Howe’s recovery from a pair of strokes just before the holidays was treated by the general media as a true Christmas miracle. The scientific press tried to layer the coverage with some questions of what we don’t know about his case but not the mainstream media. The one exception I saw was Brad Fikes in the San Diego Union Tribune who had to rely on a couple of scientists who were openly speaking out at the time. We wrote about their concerns then as well.

Now two major outlets have raised questions in long pieces back-to-back yesterday and this morning. The Star in hockey-crazed Canada wrote the first piece and New York Magazine wrote today’s. Both raise serious questions about whether stem cells could have been the cause of Howe’s recovery and are valuable additions to the coverage.

Getting the right tools for the right job

Imagine a device that sits outside the body and works like a form of dialysis for a damaged liver, filtering out the toxins and giving the liver a chance to regenerate, and the patient a chance to avoid the need for a transplant.

Or imagine a method of enhancing the number of stem cells we can harvest or generate from umbilical cord blood, enabling us to use those stem cells and offer life-saving bone marrow transplants to all the patients who don’t have a matched donor.

Well, you may not have to imagine for too long. Yesterday, our governing Board approved almost $30 million in funding for our Tools and Technology Awards and two of the successful applications are for researchers hoping to turn those two ideas into reality.

The Tools n Tech awards may not have the glamor or cache of the big money awards that are developing treatments heading towards clinical trials, but they are nonetheless an essential part of what we do.

As our Board Chair Jonathan Thomas said in a news release they focus on developing new approaches or creating new ways of overcoming some of the biggest obstacles in stem cell research.

“Sometimes even the most promising therapy can be derailed by a tiny problem. These awards are designed to help find ways to overcome those problems, to bridge the gaps in our knowledge and ensure that the best research is able to keep progressing and move out of the lab and into clinical trials in patients.”

Altogether 20 awards were funded for a wide variety of different ideas and projects. Some focus on improving our ability to manufacture the kinds of cells we need for transplanting into patients. Another one plans to use a new class of genetic engineering tools to re-engineer the kind of stem cells found in bone marrow, making them resistant to HIV/AIDS. They also hope this method could ultimately be used to directly target the stem cells while they are inside the body, rather than taking the cells out and performing the same procedure in a lab and later transplanting them back.

Dr. Kent Leach, UC Davis School of Engineering

Dr. Kent Leach, UC Davis School of Engineering

One of the winners was Dr. Kent Leach from the University of California, Davis School of Engineering. He’s looking to make a new kind of imaging probe, one that uses light and sound to measure the strength and durability of bone and cartilage created by stem cells. This could eliminate the need for biopsies to make the same measurements, which is good news for patients and might also help reduce healthcare costs.

We featured Dr. Leach in one of our Spotlight videos where he talks about using stem cells to help repair broken bones that no longer respond to traditional methods.

Strong ARMing regenerative medicine; bold thoughts on a bright future

It’s a time-honored tradition for the President of the United States to begin his State of the Union speech by saying “The state of our union is strong.” Well, Ed Lanphier, the incoming Chairman of the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM) – the industry trade group – took a leaf out of that book in kicking off the annual “State of the Industry Briefing” in San Francisco yesterday. He said the state of the industry is not just strong, but getting stronger all the time.

ARM_State_of_the_Industry_Briefing_2015_And he had the facts to back him up. In monetary terms alone he said the regenerative medicine field raised $6.3 billion in 2014, compared to $2.3 billion in 2013.

He pointed to the growing number of partnerships and alliances between big pharmaceutical businesses and smaller biotech and cell therapy companies as a sign that deep pocket investors recognize the potential in the field, saying “Big Pharma sees the value of these outcomes and the maturation of these pipelines.”

Lanphier also highlighted the more than 375 clinical trials that were underway last year, and the fact that more than 60 regenerative medicine products have been approved.

But he also pointed out that the field as a whole faces some big challenges in the coming years. One of the most pressing could be pricing. He cited criticisms that exploded over medicines like Gilead’s hepatitis C treatment Sovaldi because of its $1,000-a-day price tag. Lanphier warned that regenerative medicine could face similar criticisms when some of its therapies are finally approved, because they are likely to be very expensive (at least to start with). He said we need to start thinking now how to talk to patients and the public in general about this, so they understand why these treatments are so expensive, but may be cheaper in the long run if they cure rather than just treat disease.

As if to reinforce that message the first panel discussion in the briefing focused on the gene therapy and genome-editing field. Panel members talked about the high expectations for this field in the 1990’s but that it took decades of work before we finally started to see those early hopes turn into reality.

Jeffrey Walsh, the COO of bluebird bio talked about: “The excitement about gene therapy in the early days… and then having to survive the 15-20 years after that in the very challenging days for gene therapy.”

Katrine Bosley, the CEO of Editas Medicine, says those challenges have not gone away and that the field will have to address some big issues in the future. Among those are working with regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to win approval for completely new ways of treating disease. Another is anticipating the kinds of ethical issues they will have to address in using these techniques to alter genes.

Questions about the regulatory process also popped up in the second panel, which focused more on advanced therapy and drug development. Paul Laikind of ViaCyte (whose clinical trial in type 1 diabetes we are funding) highlighted those challenges saying: “Making the cells the way you want is not rocket science; but doing it in a way that meets regulatory requirements is rocket science.”

Paul Wotton, the President and CEO of Ocata Therapeutics (formerly called ACT) echoed those sentiments:

“We are pioneering things here and it’s the pioneers who often end up with arrows in their back, so you really have to spend a lot of time working with the FDA and other regulatory bodies to make sure you are having all the right conversations ahead of time.”

But while everyone freely acknowledged there are challenging times ahead, the mood was still very positive, perhaps best summed up by C. Randal Mills, the President of CEO of CIRM and moderator of the panel, when he said:

“I find it remarkable where we are in this space today – with this number of cutting edge companies in clinical trials. Stem cell therapy is becoming a reality, it’s no longer a place where only a foolish few dare to go in; it’s a reality. There is a change in the practice of medicine that is coming and we are all fortunate to be a part of it.”

CIRM-funded scientists track the steps that take an adult cell back in time

The ability to transform an adult cell back into a stem cell has been heralded as one of the greatest achievements of the 21st century. Scientists have lauded this discovery, made by Nobel Prize-winning scientist Shinya Yamanaka, as a game changer for the future of medicine.

Despite this extraordinary advance, the method remains inefficient. And even the top experts still don’t quite understand how it works.

But now, a team of stem cell scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) has mapped the precise series of steps that an adult skin cell must go through to become a stem cell. The results, published online in the journal Cell, represent a much-needed step towards bringing cellular reprogramming forward.

A colony of iPSC's obtained by reprogramming a specialized cell for two weeks. The starting specialized cells can only make more of themselves, while the reprogrammed cells obtained from them can give rise to all cells of the body.

A colony of iPSC’s obtained by reprogramming a specialized cell for two weeks. The starting specialized cells can only make more of themselves, while the reprogrammed cells obtained from them can give rise to all cells of the body.

In this study, co-first authors Vincent Pasque and Jason Tchieu initiated the reprogramming process, whereby adult cells are reprogrammed back into embryonic-like stem cells. Yamanaka called these cells induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs.

In order to map the steps being taken to reprogram these cells, the team devised a detailed time-course analysis whereby they would observe and analyze the cells each day as they transformed over a period of two weeks.

Importantly, the team found that no matter what type of adult cells were involved, the specific steps it took during reprogramming were the same. This revelation, that all adult cell types follow the same road map, is one of the most exciting discoveries. Said Pasque in a news release:

“The exact stage of reprogramming of any cell can now be determined. This study signals a big change in our thinking, because it provides simple and efficient tools for scientists to study stem cell creation in a stage-by-stage manner.”

The research team, led by CIRM grantee Katherin Plath, also uncovered some interesting information about the sequence of steps taken by these reprogrammed cells.

When an adult cell is reprogrammed back into an iPSC, it is not simply that all the steps that normally take an embryonic stem cell into an adult cell are reversed. Some may be reversed in the correct order, but others are not. And some steps are put off until the very end—indicating strong resistance against reprogramming.

“This reflects how cells do not like to change from one specialized cell type into another and resist a change in cellular identity,” said Pasque.

With future work, the team hopes to continue to investigate the reprogramming process. They are also hopeful that this newfound insight will bring robust iPSC-based therapies to the clinic.

CIRM 2.0: A New Year, a new start, a new way to advance research

It’s tradition to begin the New Year by making a resolution. Wikipedia has a wonderful description of what this involves saying it is where “a person makes a promise to do an act of self-improvement or something slightly nice, such as opening doors for people beginning from New Year’s Day.”

CIRM2.0_Logo

Well, by that criteria, CIRM 2.0 is a perfect way for us to start 2015 because it is both an act of self-improvement and something “slightly nice” (love that phrase).

2.0, for those of you who haven’t been following us, is a rather dramatic overhaul of the way we do business. It’s about streamlining the way we work in a way that places added emphasis on speed, partnerships and patients.

CIRM 2.0 makes it easier for both companies and academic researchers with promising projects to partner with CIRM to get the support they need when they need it, reducing the time from application to funding from around two years to just 120 days – that’s the “self-improvement”.

In a news release marking the launch of 2.0, our President and CEO Randy Mills summed up the reason why we are making these changes:

“Our mission is to accelerate the development of stem cell therapies for patients with unmet medical needs. Today, in officially launching the first three programs under CIRM 2.0, we have boldly reaffirmed our commitment to continuously seek new and innovative ways to better serve that mission.”

Simply put, we hope that by improving the way we work we can help speed up the development of treatments for patients in need. I would say that more than qualifies as being “slightly nice.”

You can hear Randy talking about CIRM 2.0 here

This is just the first phase of our new look. In December our governing Board gave us $50 million to get this up and running for clinical stage work over the next six months (you can find links to the Program Announcements for that work on our news release). Later this year we are going to expand 2.0 to include both discovery – or basic – research and translational research.

We are now in our 11th year as an agency funding stem cell research. Last year was a big year for us with 8 projects we are funding approved for clinical trials. But as we see every New Year, getting a little older shouldn’t stop you from wanting to improve or making the next year or years even better. Or from just doing something “slightly nice” for others.

Stem Cell Stories that Caught Your Eye: The Most Popular Stem Cellar Stories of 2014

2014 marked an extraordinary year for regenerative medicine and for CIRM. We welcomed a new president, several of our research programs have moved into clinical trials—and our goal of accelerating treatments for patients in need is within our grasp.

As we look back we’d like to revisit The Stem Cellar’s ten most popular stories of 2014. We hope you enjoyed reading them as much as we did reporting them. And from all of us here at the Stem Cell Agency we wish you a Happy Holidays and New Year.

10. UCSD Team Launches CIRM-Funded Trial to Test Safety of New Leukemia Drug

9. Creating a Genetic Model for Autism, with a Little Help from the Tooth Fairy

8. A Tumor’s Trojan Horse: CIRM Researchers Build Nanoparticles to Infiltrate Hard-to-Reach Tumors

7. CIRM funded therapy for type 1 diabetes gets FDA approval for clinical trial

6. New Videos: Living with Crohn’s Disease and Working Towards a Stem Cell Therapy

5. Creativity Program Students Reach New Heights with Stem Cell-Themed Rendition of “Let it Go”

4. Scientists Reach Yet Another Milestone towards Treating Type 1 Diabetes

3. Meet the Stem Cell Agency President C. Randal Mills

2. Truth or Consequences: how to spot a liar and what to do once you catch them

1. UCLA team cures infants of often-fatal “bubble baby” disease by inserting gene in their stem cells; sickle cell disease is next target