Stem cell stories that caught our eye: drug safety for heart cells, worms hijack plant stem cells & battling esophageal cancer

Devising a drug safety measuring stick in stem cell-derived heart muscle cells
One of the mantras in the drug development business is “fail early”. That’s because most of the costs of getting a therapy to market occur at the later stages when an experimental treatment is tested in clinical trials in people. So, it’s best for a company’s bottom line and, more importantly, for patient safety to figure out sooner rather than later if a therapy has dangerous toxic side effects.

Researchers at Stanford reported this week in Science Translational Medicine on a method they devised that could help weed out cancer drugs with toxic effects on the heart before the treatment is tested in people.

In the lab, the team grew beating heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from both healthy volunteers and kidney cancer patients. A set of cancer drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors which are known to have a range of serious side effects on the heart, were added to the cells. The effect of the drugs on the heart cell function were measured with several different tests which the scientists combined into a single “safety index”.

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A single human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte. Cells such as these were used to assess tyrosine kinase inhibitors for cardiotoxicity in a high-throughput fashion. Credit: Dr. Arun Sharma at Dr. Joseph Wu’s laboratory at Stanford University

They found that the drugs previously shown to have toxic effects on patients’ hearts had the worst safety index values in the current study. And because these cells were in a lab dish and not in a person’s heart, the team was able to carefully examine cell activity and discovered that the toxic effects of three drugs could be alleviated by also adding insulin to the cells.

As lead author Joseph Wu, director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, mentions in a press release, the development of this drug safety index could provide a powerful means to streamline the drug development process and make the drugs safer:

“This type of study represents a critical step forward from the usual process running from initial drug discovery and clinical trials in human patients. It will help pharmaceutical companies better focus their efforts on developing safer drugs, and it will provide patients more effective drugs with fewer side effects”

Worm feeds off of plants by taking control of their stem cells
In what sounds like a bizarre mashup of a vampire movie with a gardening show, a study reported this week pinpoints how worms infiltrate plants by commandeering the plants’ own stem cells. Cyst nematodes are microscopic roundworms that invade and kill soybean plants by sucking out their nutrients. This problem isn’t a trivial matter since nematodes wreak billions of dollars of damage to the world’s soybean crops each year. So, it’s not surprising that researchers want to understand how exactly these critters attack the plants.

nematode-feeding-site

A nematode, the oblong object on the left, activates the vascular stem cell pathway in the developing nematode feeding site on a plant root. Credit: Xiaoli Guo, University of Missouri

Previous studies by Melissa Goellner Mitchum, a professor at the University of Missouri, had shown that the nematodes release protein fragments, called peptides, near a plant’s roots that help divert the flow of plant nutrients to the worm.

“These parasites damage root systems by creating a unique feeding cell within the roots of their hosts and leeching nutrients out of the soybean plant. This can lead to stunting, wilting and yield loss for the plant,” Mitchum explained in a press release.

In the current PLOS Pathogens study, Mitchum’s team identified another peptide produced by the nematode that is identical to a plant peptide that instructs stem cells to form the plant equivalent of blood vessels. This devious mimicking of the plant peptides is what allows the nematode to trick the plant stem cells into building vessels that reroute the plants’ nutrients directly to the worm.

Mitchum described the big picture implications of this fascinating discovery:

“Understanding how plant-parasitic nematodes modulate host plants to their own benefit is a crucial step in helping to create pest-resistant plants. If we can block those peptides and the pathways nematodes use to overtake the soybean plant, then we can enhance resistance for this very valuable global food source.”

Finding vulnerabilities in treatment-resistant esophageal cancer stem cells

diagram_showing_internal_radiotherapy_for_cancer_of_the_oesophagus_cruk_162-svg

Illustration of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer.
Credit: Cancer Research UK

The incidence of esophageal cancer has increased more than any other disease over the past 30 years. And while some patients respond well to chemotherapy and radiation treatment, most do not because the cancer becomes resistant to these treatments.

Focusing on cancer stem cells, researchers at Trinity College Dublin have identified an approach that may overcome treatment resistance.

Within tumors are thought to lie cancer stem cells that, just like stem cells, have the ability to multiply indefinitely. Even though they make up a small portion of a tumor, in some patients the cancer stem cells evade the initial rounds of treatment and are responsible for the return of the cancer which is often more aggressive. Currently, there’s no effective way to figure out how well a patient with esophageal cancer will response to treatment.

In the current study published in Oncotarget, the researchers found that a genetic molecule called miR-17 was much less abundant in the esophageal cancer stem cells. In fact, the cancer stem cells with the lowest levels of miR-17, were the most resistant to radiation therapy. The researchers went on to show that adding back miR-17 to the highly resistant cells made them sensitive again to the radiation. Niamh Lynam-Lennon, the study’s first author, explained in a press release that these results could have direct clinical applications:

“Going forward, we could use synthetic miR-17 as an addition to radiotherapy to enhance its effectiveness in patients. This is a real possibility as a number of other synthetic miR-molecules are currently in clinical trials for treating other diseases.”

Curing the Incurable through Definitive Medicine

“Curing the Incurable”. That was the theme for the first annual Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine (CDCM) Symposium held last week at Stanford University, in Palo Alto, California.

The CDCM is a joint initiative amongst Stanford Healthcare, Stanford Children’s Health and the Stanford School of Medicine. Its mission is to foster an environment that accelerates the development and translation of cell and gene therapies into clinical trials.

The research symposium focused on “the exciting first-in-human cell and gene therapies currently under development at Stanford in bone marrow, skin, cardiac, neural, pancreatic and neoplastic diseases.” These talks were organized into four different sessions: cell therapies for neurological disorders, stem cell-derived tissue replacement therapies, genome-edited cell therapies and anti-cancer cell-based therapies.

A few of the symposium speakers are CIRM-funded grantees, and we’ll briefly touch on their talks below.

Targeting cancer

The keynote speaker was Irv Weissman, who talked about hematopoietic or blood-forming stem cells and their value as a cell therapy for patients with blood disorders and cancer. One of the projects he discussed is a molecule called CD47 that is found on the surface of cancer cells. He explained that CD47 appears on all types of cancer cells more abundantly than on normal cells and is a promising therapeutic target for cancer.

Irv Weissman

Irv Weissman

“CD47 is the first gene whose overexpression is common to all cancer. We know it’s molecular mechanism from which we can develop targeted therapies. This would be impossible without collaborations between clinicians and scientists.”

 

At the end of his talk, Weissman acknowledged the importance of CIRM’s funding for advancing an antibody therapeutic targeting CD47 into a clinical trial for solid cancer tumors. He said CIRM’s existence is essential because it “funds [stem cell-based] research through the [financial] valley of death.” He further explained that CIRM is the only funding entity that takes basic stem cell research all the way through the clinical pipeline into a therapy.

Improving bone marrow transplants

judith shizuru

Judith Shizuru

Next, we heard a talk from Judith Shizuru on ways to improve current bone-marrow transplantation techniques. She explained how this form of stem cell transplant is “the most powerful form of cell therapy out there, for cancers or deficiencies in blood formation.” Inducing immune system tolerance, improving organ transplant outcomes in patients, and treating autoimmune diseases are all applications of bone marrow transplants. But this technique also carries with it toxic and potentially deadly side effects, including weakening of the immune system and graft vs host disease.

Shizuru talked about her team’s goal of improving the engraftment, or survival and integration, of bone marrow stem cells after transplantation. They are using an antibody against a molecule called CD117 which sits on the surface of blood stem cells and acts as an elimination signal. By blocking CD117 with an antibody, they improved the engraftment of bone marrow stem cells in mice and also removed the need for chemotherapy treatment, which is used to kill off bone marrow stem cells in the host. Shizuru is now testing her antibody therapy in a CIRM-funded clinical trial in humans and mentioned that this therapy has the potential to treat a wide variety of diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemias, and multiple sclerosis.

Tackling stroke and heart disease

img_1327We also heard from two CIRM-funded professors working on cell-based therapies for stroke and heart disease. Gary Steinberg’s team is using human neural progenitor cells, which develop into cells of the brain and spinal cord, to treat patients who’ve suffered from stroke. A stroke cuts off the blood supply to the brain, causing the death of brain cells and consequently the loss of function of different parts of the body.  He showed emotional videos of stroke patients whose function and speech dramatically improved following the stem cell transplant. One of these patients was Sonia Olea, a young woman in her 30’s who lost the ability to use most of her right side following her stroke. You can read about her inspiring recover post stem cell transplant in our Stories of Hope.

Dr. Joe Wu. (Image Source: Sean Culligan/OZY)

Dr. Joe Wu. (Image Source: Sean Culligan/OZY)

Joe Wu followed with a talk on adult stem cell therapies for heart disease. His work, which is funded by a CIRM disease team grant, involves making heart cells called cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells and transplanting these cells into patient with end stage heart failure to improve heart function. His team’s work has advanced to the point where Wu said they are planning to file for an investigational new drug (IND) application with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in six months. This is the crucial next step before a treatment can be tested in clinical trials. Joe ended his talk by making an important statement about expectations on how long it will take before stem cell treatments are available to patients.

He said, “Time changes everything. It [stem cell research] takes time. There is a lot of promise for the future of stem cell therapy.”

Stories that caught our eye: new target for killing leukemia cancer stem cells and stem cell vesicles halt glaucoma

New stem cell target for acute myeloid leukemia (Karen Ring).  A new treatment for acute myeloid leukemia, a type of blood cancer that turns bone marrow stem cells cancerous, could be in the works in the form of a cancer stem cell destroying antibody.

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Credit: Medscape)

Scientists from the NYU Langone Medical Center and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center identified a protein called CD99 that appears more abundantly on the surface of abnormal blood cancer stem cells compared to healthy blood stem cells. They developed an antibody that specifically recognizes and kills the CD99 wielding cancer stem cells while leaving the healthy blood stem cells unharmed.

The CD99 antibody was effective at killing human AML stem cells in a dish and in mice that were transplanted with the same type of cancer stem cells. Further studies revealed that the CD99 antibody when attached to the surface of cancer stem cells, sets off a cascade of enzyme activity that causes these cells to die. These findings suggest that cancer stem cells express more CD99 as a protective mechanism against cell death.

In an interview with Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News, Chris Park, senior author on the Science Translational Medicine study, explained the importance of their work:

“Our findings not only identify a new molecule expressed on stem cells that drive these human malignancies, but we also show that antibodies against this target can directly kill human AML stem cells. While we still have important details to work out, CD99 is likely to be an exploitable therapeutic target for most AML and MDS patients, and we are working urgently to finalize a therapy for human testing.”

While this work is still in the early stages, Dr. Park stressed that his team is actively working to translate their CD99 antibody therapy into clinical trials.

“With the appropriate support, we believe we can rapidly determine the best antibodies for use in patients, produce them at the quality needed to verify our results, and apply for permission to begin clinical trials.”

 

Peculiar stem cell function may help treat blindness (Todd Dubnicoff). Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have uncovered a novel function that stem cells use to carry out their healing powers and it may lead to therapies for glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness in United States. Reporting this week in Stem Cells Translational Medicine, the researchers show that stem cells send out regenerative signals by shedding tiny vesicles called exosomes. Once thought to be merely a garbage disposal system, exosomes are now recognized as an important means of communication between cells. As they bud off from the cells, the exosomes carry proteins and genetic material that can be absorbed by other cells.

Microscopy image shows exosomes (green) surrounding retinal ganglion cells (orange and yellow). Credit: Ben Mead

Microscopy image shows exosomes (green) surrounding retinal ganglion cells (orange and yellow). Credit: Ben Mead

The researchers at NEI isolated exosomes from bone marrow stem cells and injected them into the eyes of rats with glaucoma symptoms. Without treatment, these animals lose about 90 percent of their retinal ganglion cells, the cells responsible for forming the optic nerve and for sending visual information to the brain. With the exosome treatment, the rats only lost a third of the retinal ganglion cells. The team determined that microRNAs – small genetic molecules that can inhibit gene activity – inside the exosome were responsible for the effect.

Exosomes have some big advantages over stem cells when comes to developing and manufacturing therapies which lead author Ben Mead explains in a press release picked up by Eureka Alert:

“Exosomes can be purified, stored and precisely dosed in ways that stem cells cannot.”

We’ll definitely keep our eyes on this development. If these glaucoma studies continue to look promising it stands to reason that there would be exosome applications in many other diseases.

Stem Cell Profiles in Courage: Karl’s Fight with Cancer

Karl Trede

Karl Trede

When I think of a pioneer I have an image in my head of people heading west across the Americans plains in the 18th century, riding in a covered wagon pulled by weary oxen.

Karl Trede doesn’t fit that image at all. He is a trim, elegant man who has a ready smile and a fondness for Hawaiian shirts. But he is no less a pioneer for all that. That’s why we profiled him in our 2016 Annual Report.

In 2006 Karl was diagnosed with cancer of the throat. He underwent surgery to remove his vocal chords and thought he had beaten the cancer. A few years later, it came back. That was when Karl became the first person ever treated in a CIRM-funded clinical trial testing a new anti-tumor therapy targeting cancer stem cells that so far has helped hold the disease at bay.

Here is Karl’s story, in his own words:

“I had some follow-up tests and those showed spots in my lungs. Over the course of several years, they saw those spots grow, and we knew the cancer had spread to my lungs. I went to Stanford and was told there was no effective treatment for it, fortunately it was slow growing.

Then one day they said we have a new clinical trial we’re going to start would you be interested in being part of it.

I don’t believe I knew at the time that I was going to be the first one in the trial [now that’s what I call a pioneer] but I thought I’d give it a whirl and I said ‘Sure’. I wasn’t real concerned about being the first in a trial never tested in people before. I figured I was going to have to go someday so I guess if I was the first person and something really went wrong then they’d definitely learn something; so, to me, that was kind of worth my time.

Fortunately, I lasted 13 months, 72 treatments with absolutely no side effects. I consider myself really lucky to have been a part of it.

It was an experience for me, it was eye opening. I got an IV infusion, and the whole process was 4 hours once a week.

Dr. Sikic (the Stanford doctor who oversees the clinical trial) made it a practice of staying in the room with me when I was getting my treatments because they’d never tried it in people, they’d tested it in mice, but hadn’t tested it in people and wanted to make sure they were safe and nothing bad happened.

The main goals of the trial were to define what the side effects were and what the right dose is and they got both of those. So I feel privileged to have been a part of this.

My wife and I (Vita) have four boys. They’re spread out now – two in the San Francisco Bay Area, one in Oregon and one in Nevada. But we like to get together a few times a year. They’re all good cooks, so when we have a family get together there’s a lot of cooking involved.

The Saturday after Thanksgiving, in 2015, the boys decided they wanted to have a rib cook-off for up to around 30 people and I can proudly say that I kicked their ass on the rib cook-off. I have an electric cooker and I just cook ‘em slow and long. I do a cranberry sauce, just some home made bbq sauces

I’m a beef guy, I love a good steak, a good ribeye or prime rib, I make a pretty mean Oso bucco, I make a good spaghetti sauce, baked chicken with an asparagus mousse that is pretty good.

I just consider myself a lucky guy.”

Karl Trede with CIRM President Randy Mills at the 2016 December Board meeting.

Karl Trede with CIRM President Randy Mills at the 2016 December Board meeting.


Related Links:

Stem cell and gene therapy research gets a good report card from industry leader

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Panel discussion at ARM State of the industry briefing: left to Right Robert Preti, Chair ARM; Jeff Walsh, bluebird bio; Manfred Rudiger, Kiadis Pharma; Barbara Sasu, Pfizer;  Thomas Farrell, Bellicum Pharmaceuticals. Photo courtesy ARM.

The state of the regenerative medicine field is strong and getting stronger. That was the bottom line verdict at the 2017 Cell and Gene Therapies State of the Industry briefing in San Francisco.

The briefing, an annual update on the field presented by the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM), gave a “by the numbers” look at the field and apart from one negative spot everything is moving in the right direction.

Robert Preti, Chair of ARM’s Board, said worldwide there are more than 750 regenerative companies working in the stem cell and gene therapy space. And those companies are increasingly moving the research out of the lab and into clinical trials in people.

For example, at the end of 2016 there were 802 clinical trials underway. That is a 21 percent growth over 2015. Those breakdown as follows:

Phase 1 – 271 (compared to 192 in 2015)

Phase 2 – 465 (compared to 376 in 2015)

Phase 3 – 66 (compared to 63 in 2015)

The bulk of these clinical trials, 45 percent, are focused on cancer. The second largest target, 11 percent, is on heart disease. The number of trials for neurological disorders and rare diseases are also growing in number.

Preti says the industry is at an important inflection point right now and that this growth is presenting new problems:

“The pipeline of products is robust and the technologies supporting that pipeline is even more robust. The technologies that are fueling the growth in clinical activity have accelerated so fast that we on the manufacturing side are playing catchup. We are at a point where we have to get serious about large scale commercial production.”

Preti also talked about “harmonization” of the regulatory process and the need to have a system that makes it easier for products approved for clinical trials in one country, to get approval for clinical trials in other countries.

Michael Werner, the executive director of ARM, said the organization has played a key role in helping promote the field and cited the recently passed 21st Century Cures Act as “a major win and a powerful statement of ARM’s leadership in this sector.”

But there was one area where the news wasn’t all positive, the ability of companies to raise capital. In 2015 companies raised $11 billion for research. In 2016 it was less than half of that, $5.3 billion.

With that somber note in mind it was appropriate that the panel discussion that followed the briefing was focused on the near-term and long-term challenges facing the field if it was to be commercially successful.

One of the big challenges was the issue of regulatory approval, and here the panel seemed to be more optimistic than in previous years.

Manfred Rüdiger of Kiadis Pharma said he was pleasantly surprised at how easy it was to work with different regulatory agencies in the US, Canada and Europe.

“We used them as a kind of free consultancy service, listening to their advice and making the changes they suggested so that we were able to use the same manufacturing process in Europe and Canada and the US.”

Jeff Walsh of bluebird bio, said the key to having a good working relationship with regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is simple:

“Trust and transparency between you and the regulatory agencies is essential, it’s a critical factor in advancing your work. The agencies respond well when you have that trust. One thing we can’t be is afraid to ask. The agencies will tell you where their line is, but don’t be afraid to ask or to push the boundaries. This is new for everyone, companies and regulators, so if you are pushing it helps create the environment that allows you to work together to develop safe therapies that benefit patients.”

Another big issue was scalability in manufacturing; that it’s one thing to produce enough of a product to carry out a clinical trial but completely different if you are hoping to use that same product to treat millions of people spread out all over the US or the world.

And of course cost is always something that is front and center in people’s minds. How do you develop therapies that are not just safe and effective, but also affordable? How do companies ensure they will get reimbursed by health insurers for the treatments? No one had any simple answer to what are clearly very complex problems. But all recognized the need to start thinking about these now, long before the treatments themselves are even ready.

Walsh ended by saying:

“This is not just about what can you charge but what should you charge. We have a responsibility to engage with the agencies and ultimately the payers that make these decisions, in the same way we engage with regulatory agencies; with a sense of openness, trust and transparency. Too often companies wait too long, too late before turning to the payers and trying to decide what is appropriate to charge.”

 

 

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: designer socks for cancer patients, stem-cell derived stomachs and fighting off bone infections

Inspiring cancer patients with designer socks. (Karen Ring)
Here’s a motivating story we found in the news this week about a cancer survivor who’s bringing inspiration to other cancer patients with designer socks. Yes, you read that correctly, socks.

Jake Teitelbaum is a student at Wake Forest University and suffers from a rare form of blood cancer called Refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Since his diagnosis, Jake has been admitted to hospitals multiple times. Each time he received a welcome package of a gown and a pair of beige, “lifeless” socks. After his fifth welcome package, this time to receive a life-saving stem cell treatment, Jake had had enough of the socks.

He explained in a story by USA Today College,

“[Those socks] represented chemotherapy and being in isolation. They were the embodiment of that experience.”

Jake ditched the hospital socks and started bringing his own to prove that his cancer didn’t define him. Even though his cancer kept coming back, Jake wanted to prove he was just as resilient.

Jake Teitelbaum

Jake Teitelbaum

Feeling liberated and in control, Jake decided to share his socks with other patients by starting the Resilience Project. Patients can go to the Resilience website and design their own socks that represent their experiences with cancer. The Resilience project also raises money for cancer patients and their families.

“We provide tangible benefits and create fun socks, but what we’re doing comes back to the essence of resilience,” said Jake. “These terrible circumstances where we’re at our most vulnerable also give us the unique opportunity to grow.”

Jake was declared cancer free in October of 2016. You can learn more about the Resilience project on their website and by watching Jake’s video below.

 

Feeding disease knowledge with stem cell-derived stomach cells.
Using educated guess work and plenty of trial and error in the lab, researchers around the world have successfully generated many human tissues from stem cells, including heart muscle cells, insulin-producing cells and nerve cells to name just a few. Reporting this week in Nature, stem cell scientists at Cincinnati’s Children Hospital have a new cell type under their belt. Or maybe I should say above their belt, because they have devised a method for coaxing stem cells to become stomach mini organs that can be studied in a petri dish.

Confocal microscopic image shows tissue-engineered human stomach tissues from the corpus/fundus region, which produce acid and digestive enzymes. Image: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Confocal microscopic image shows tissue-engineered human stomach tissues from the corpus/fundus region, which produce acid and digestive enzymes. Image: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

With this method in hand, the team is poised to make new discoveries about how the stomach forms during human development and to better understand stomach diseases. In a press release, team lead Jim Wells pointed out the need to find new therapies for stomach disease:

“Diseases of the stomach impact millions of people in the United States and gastric [stomach] cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.”

The cells they generated are those found in the corpus/fundus area of the stomach which releases enzymes and hydrochloric acid to help us break down and digest the food we eat. The team is particularly interested to use the mini organs to study the impact of H. pylori infection, a type of bacteria that causes ulcers and has been linked to stomach cancers.

In an earlier study, Wells’ group devised stem cell recipes for making cells from an area of the stomach, called the antrum, that produces hormones that affect digestion and appetite. Wells thinks having both tissue types recreated in a petri dish may help provide a complete picture of stomach function:

James Wells

James Wells

“Now that we can grow both antral- and corpus/fundic-type human gastric mini-organs, it’s possible to study how these human gastric tissues interact physiologically, respond differently to infection, injury and react to pharmacologic treatments.”

 

 

A silver bullet for antibiotic-resistant bone infections?
Alexander Fleming’s discover of penicillin in the 1920’s marked the dawn of antibiotics – drugs which kill off bacteria and help stop infections. Rough estimates suggest that over 200 million lives have been saved by these wonder drugs. But over time there’s been a frightening rise in bacteria that are resistant to almost all available antibiotics.

These super resistant “bugs” are particularly scary for people with chronic bone infections because the intense, long term antibiotic medication required to keep the infection in check isn’t effective. But based on research published this week in Tissue Engineering, the use of stem cells and silver may provide a new treatment option.

Scanning Electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, brown spheres) surrounded by cellular debris. MRSA, the bacteria examined in this study, is resistant by many antibiotics

Scanning Electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, brown spheres) surrounded by cellular debris. MRSA, the bacteria examined in this study, is resistant by many antibiotics. (Wikimedia)

It’s been known for many years that silver in liquid form can kill bacteria and scientists have examined ways to deliver a controlled release of silver nanoparticles at the site of the bone infection. But there has been a lot of concern, including by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), about the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to human cells.

In this study, a team led by Elizabeth Loboa from the University of Missouri instead looked at the use of silver ions which are safer than the nanoparticles. The team developed a three-dimensional cell culture system that resembles bone by growing human bone-forming stem cells on a tissue engineered scaffold, which also slowly releases silver ions.

The researchers stimulated the stem cells within the scaffold to specialize into bone cells and included a strain of bacteria that’s resistant to multiple antibiotics. They found that the silver ions effectively killed the bacteria and at the same time did not block the bone-forming stem cells. If this work holds up, doctors may one day use this silver ion-releasing, biodegradable scaffold to directly treat the area of bone infection. And to help prevent infection after joint replacement procedures, surgeons may rely on implants that are coated with these scaffolds.

Genetically engineered immune cells melt away deadly brain tumors

MRI scan of patient with glioblastoma tumor. (wikicommons)

MRI scan of patient with glioblastoma. (wikicommons)

Cancers come in many different forms. Some are treatable if caught early and other aren’t. One of the most deadly types of cancers are glioblastomas – a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor.  Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma have an average life expectancy of 12-15 months and there is no cure or effective treatment that extends life.

While a glioblastoma diagnosis has pretty much been a death sentence, now there could be a silver lining to this deadly, fast-paced disease. Last week, scientists from the City of Hope in southern California reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, a new cell-based therapy that melted away brain tumors in a patient with an advanced stage of glioblastoma.

An Immunotherapy Approach to Glioblastoma

The patient is a 50-year-old man named Richard Grady who was participating in an investigational clinical trial run out of the City of Hope’s CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic. A brain scan revealed a brightly lit tumor on the right side of Richard’s brain. Doctors surgically removed the tumor and treated him with radiation in an attempt to staunch further growth. But after six months, the tumors came back with a vengeance, spreading to other parts of his brain, lighting up his MRI scan like a Christmas tree.

With few treatment options and little time left, Richard was enrolled in the City of Hope trial that was testing a cell-based immunotherapy that recognizes and attacks cancer cells. It’s called CAR T-cell therapy – a term that you probably have heard in the news as a promising and cutting-edge treatment for cancer. Scientists extract immune cells, called T-cells, from a patient’s blood and reengineer them in the laboratory to recognize unique surface markers on cancer cells. These specialized CAR T-cells are then put back into the patient to attack and kill off cancer cells.

In Richard’s case, CAR-T cells were first infused into his brain through a tube in an area where a tumor was recently removed. No new tumors grew in that location of his brain, but tumors in other areas continued to grow and spread to his spinal cord. At this point, the scientists decided to place a second tube into a cavity of the brain called the ventricles, which contain a clear liquid called cerebrospinal fluid. Directly infusing into the spinal fluid allowed the cancer fighting cells to travel to different parts of the brain and spinal cord to attack the tumors.

Behnam Badie, senior author on the study and neurosurgery chief at the City of Hope, explained in a news release,

Benham Badie, City of Hope

Benham Badie, City of Hope

“By injecting the reengineered CAR-T cells directly into the tumor site and the ventricles, where the spinal fluid is made, the treatment could be delivered throughout the patient’s brain and also to the spinal cord, where this particular patient had a large metastatic tumor.”

 

Bye Bye Brain Tumors? Almost…

Three infusions of the CAR T-cell treatment shrunk Richard’s tumors noticeably, and a total of ten infusions was enough to melt away Richard’s tumors completely. Amazingly, Richard was able to reduce his medications and go back to work.

TESt

CAR T-cell therapy reduces brain tumors when infused into the spinal fluid. (NEJM)

The effects of the immunotherapy lasted for seven-and-a-half months. Unfortunately, his glioblastoma did come back, and he is now undergoing radiation treatment. Instead of being discouraged by these results, we should be encouraged. Patients with advanced cases of glioblastoma like Richard often have only weeks left to live, and the prospect of another seven months of life with family and friends is a gift.

Following these promising results in a single patient, the City of Hope team has now treated a total of nine patients in their clinical trial. Their initial results indicate that the immunotherapy is relatively safe. Further studies will be done to determine whether this therapy will be effective at treating other types of cancers.

CIRM Alpha Clinics Advance Stem Cell Treatments

The findings in this study are particularly exciting to CIRM, not only because they offer a new treatment option for a deadly brain cancer, but also because the clinical trial testing this treatment is housed at one of our own Alpha Clinics. In 2014, CIRM funded three stem cell-focused clinics at the City of Hope, UC San Diego, and a joint clinic between UC Los Angeles and UC Irvine. These clinics are specialized to support high quality trials focused on stem cell treatments for various diseases. The CIRM team will be bringing a new Alpha Clinics concept plan to its governing Board for approval in February.

Geoff Lomax, Senior Officer of Strategic Infrastructure at CIRM who oversees the CIRM Alpha Clinics, commented on the importance of City of Hope’s glioblastoma trial,

“Treating this form of brain cancer is one of the most vexing challenges in medicine. With the support and expertise of the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic, City of Hope is harnessing the power of patients’ immune cells to treat this deadly disease.”

Neil Littman, CIRM Director of Business Development and Strategic Infrastructure added,

“This study provides important proof-of-concept that CAR-T cells can be used to target hard-to-treat solid tumors and is precisely the type of trial the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Network is designed to support.”

For more details on this study, watch the video below from City of Hope:

Cured by Stem Cells

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To get anywhere you need a good map, and you need to check it constantly to make sure you are still on the right path and haven’t strayed off course. A year ago the CIRM Board gave us a map, a Strategic Plan, that laid out our course for the next five years. Our Annual Report for 2016, now online, is our way of checking that we are still on the right path.

I think, without wishing to boast, that it’s safe to say not only are we on target, but we might even be a little bit ahead of schedule.

The Annual Report is chock full of facts and figures but at the heart of it are the stories of the people who are the focus of all that we do, the patients. We profile six patients and one patient advocate, each of whom has an extraordinary story to tell, and each of whom exemplifies the importance of the work we support.

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Brenden Whittaker: Cured

Two stand out for one simple reason, they were both cured of life-threatening conditions. Now, cured is not a word we use lightly. The stem cell field has been rife with hyperbole over the years so we are always very cautious in the way we talk about the impact of treatments. But in these two cases there is no need to hold back: Evangelina Padilla Vaccaro and Brenden Whittaker have been cured.

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Evangelina: Cured

 

In the coming weeks we’ll feature our conversations with all those profiled in the Annual Report, giving you a better idea of the impact the stem cell treatments have had on their lives and the lives of their family. But today we just wanted to give a broad overview of the Annual Report.

The Strategic Plan was very specific in the goals it laid out for us. As an agency we had six big goals, but each Team within the agency, and each individual within those teams had their own goals. They were our own mini-maps if you like, to help us keep track of where we were individually, knowing that every time an individual met a goal they helped the Team get closer to meeting its goals.

As you read through the report you’ll see we did a pretty good job of meeting our targets. In fact, we missed only one and we’re hoping to make up for that early in 2017.

But good as 2016 was, we know that to truly fulfill our mission of accelerating treatments to patients with unmet medical needs we are going to have do equally well, if not even better, in 2017.

That work starts today.

 

Stem cell heroes: patients who had life-saving, life-changing treatments inspire CIRM Board

 

It’s not an easy thing to bring an entire Board of Directors to tears, but four extraordinary people and their families managed to do just that at the last CIRM Board meeting of 2016.

The four are patients who have undergone life-saving or life-changing stem cell therapies that were funded by our agency. The patients and their families shared their stories with the Board as part of CIRM President & CEO Randy Mill’s preview of our Annual Report, a look back at our achievements over the last year.

The four included:

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Jake Javier, whose life changed in a heartbeat the day before he graduated high school, when he dove into a swimming pool and suffered a spinal cord injury that left him paralyzed from the chest down. A stem cell transplant is giving him hope he may regain the use of his arms and hands.

 

 

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Karl Trede who had just recovered from one life-threatening disease when he was diagnosed with lung cancer, and became the first person ever treated with a new anti-tumor therapy that helped hold the disease at bay.

 

brenden_stories_of_hopeBrenden Whittaker, born with a rare immune disorder that left his body unable to fight off bacterial or fungal infections. Repeated infections cost Brenden part of his lung and liver and almost killed him. A stem cell treatment that gave him a healthy immune system cured him.

 

 

evangelinaEvangelina Padilla Vaccaro was born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), also known as “bubbly baby” disease, which left her unable to fight off infections. Her future looked grim until she got a stem cell transplant that gave her a new blood system and a healthy immune system. Today, she is cured.

 

 

Normally CIRM Board meetings are filled with important, albeit often dry, matters such as approving new intellectual property regulations or a new research concept plan. But it’s one thing to vote to approve a clinical trial, and a very different thing to see the people whose lives you have helped change by funding that trial.

You cannot help but be deeply moved when you hear a mother share her biggest fear that her daughter would never live long enough to go to kindergarten and is now delighted to see her lead a normal life; or hear a young man who wondered if he would make it to his 24th birthday now planning to go to college to be a doctor

When you know you played a role in making these dreams happen, it’s impossible not to be inspired, and doubly determined to do everything possible to ensure many others like them have a similar chance at life.

You can read more about these four patients in our new Stories of Hope: The CIRM Stem Cell Four feature on the CIRM website. Additionally, here is a video of those four extraordinary people and their families telling their stories:

We will have more extraordinary stories to share with you when we publish our Annual Report on January 1st. 2016 was a big year for CIRM. We are determined to make 2017 even bigger.

How stem cells are helping change the face of medicine, one pioneering patient at a time

One of the many great pleasures of my job is that I get to meet so many amazing people. I get to know the researchers who are changing the face of medicine, but even more extraordinary are the people who are helping them do it, the patients.

Attacking Cancer

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Karl Trede

It’s humbling to meet people like Karl Trede from San Jose, California. Karl is a quiet, witty, unassuming man who when the need arose didn’t hesitate to put himself forward as a medical pioneer.

Diagnosed with throat cancer in 2006, Karl underwent surgery to remove the tumor. Several years later, his doctors told him it had returned, only this time it had spread to his lungs. They told him there was no effective treatment. But there was something else.

“One day the doctor said we have a new trial we’re going to start, would you be interested? I said “sure”. I don’t believe I knew at the time that I was going to be the first one, but I thought I’d give it a whirl.”

Karl was Patient #1 in a clinical trial at Stanford University that was using a novel approach to attack cancer stem cells, which have the ability to evade standard anti-cancer treatments and cause the tumors to regrow. The team identified a protein, called CD47, that sits on the surface of cancer stem cells and helps them evade being gobbled up and destroyed by the patient’s own immune system. They dubbed CD47 the “don’t eat me” signal and created an antibody therapy they hoped would block the signal, leaving the cancer and the cancer stem cells open to attack by the immune system.

The team did pre-clinical testing of the therapy, using mice to see if it was safe. Everything looked hopeful. Even so, this was still the first time it was being tested in a human. Karl said that didn’t bother him.

“It was an experience for me, it was eye opening. I wasn’t real concerned about being the first in a trial never tested in people before. I said we know that there’s no effective treatment for this cancer, it’s not likely but it’s possible that this could be the one and if nothing else, if it doesn’t do anything for me hopefully it does something so they learn for others.”

It’s that kind of selflessness that is typical of so many people who volunteer for clinical trials, particularly Phase 1 trials, where a treatment is often being tried in people for the first time ever. In these trials, the goal is to make sure the approach is safe, so patients are given a relatively small dose of the therapy (cells or drugs) and told ahead of time it may not do any good. They’re also told that there could be some side effects, potentially serious, even life-threatening ones. Still, they don’t hesitate.

Improving vision

Rosie Barrero certainly didn’t hesitate when she got a chance to be part of a clinical trial testing the use of stem cells to help people with retinitis pigmentosa, a rare progressive disease that destroys a person’s vision and ultimately leaves them blind.

Rosalinda Barrero

Rosie Barrero

“I was extremely excited about the clinical trial. I didn’t have any fear or trepidation about it, I would have been happy being #1, and I was #6 and that was fine with me.”

 

Rosie had what are called retinal progenitor cells injected into her eye, part of a treatment developed by Dr. Henry Klassen at the University of California, Irvine. The hope was that those cells would help repair and perhaps even replace the light-sensing cells damaged by the disease.

Following the stem cell treatment, gradually Rosie noticed a difference. It was small things at first, like being able to make out the colors of cups in her kitchen cupboard, or how many trash cans were outside their house.

“I didn’t expect to see so much, I thought it would be minor, and it is minor on paper but it is hard to describe the improvement. It’s visible, it’s visible improvement.”

These are the moments that researchers like Henry Klassen live for, and have worked so tirelessly for. These are the moments that everyone at CIRM dreams of, when the work we have championed, supported and funded shows it is working, shows it is changing people’s lives.

One year ago this month our governing Board approved a new Strategic Plan, a detailed roadmap of where we want to go in the coming years. The plan laid out some pretty ambitious goals, such as funding 50 new clinical trials in the next 5 years, and at our Board meeting next week we’ll report on how well we are doing in terms of hitting those targets.

People like Karl and Rosie help motivate us to keep trying, to keep working as hard as we can, to achieve those goals. And if ever we have a tough day, we just have to remind ourselves of what Rosie said when she realized she could once again see her children.

“Seeing their faces. It’s pretty incredible. I always saw them with my heart so I just adore them, but now I can see them with my eye.”


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