Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Reprogramming cells in vivo may help heal ulcers, CIRM-funded clinical trial shows promise and a New report, clears up an old question.

Stem cell image of the week:  New Research out of the Salk Institute could bring us closer to reprogramming stem cells without taking them out of the body (Adonica Shaw) Our stem cell image of the week could be a step towards reprogramming cells in vivo. The image represents the first proof of principle for the … Continue reading Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Reprogramming cells in vivo may help heal ulcers, CIRM-funded clinical trial shows promise and a New report, clears up an old question.

Comparing two cellular reprogramming methods from one donor’s cells yields good news for iPSCs

In 2012, a mere six years after his discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), Shinya Yamanaka was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. Many Nobel winners aren’t recognized until decades after their initial groundbreaking studies. That goes to show you the importance of Yamanaka’s technique, which can reprogram a person’s cells, for example skin … Continue reading Comparing two cellular reprogramming methods from one donor’s cells yields good news for iPSCs

Reprogramming cells with a nanochip, electricity and DNA to help the body to heal itself

The axolotl, a member of the salamander family, has amazing regenerative abilities. You can cut off its limbs or crush its spinal cord and it will repair itself with no scarring. A human’s healing powers, of course, are much more limited. To get around this unfortunate fact, the field of regenerative medicine aims to develop … Continue reading Reprogramming cells with a nanochip, electricity and DNA to help the body to heal itself

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: insights into stem cell biology through telomeres, reprogramming and lung disease

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun. Telomeres and stem cell stability: too much of a good thing Just like those plastic tips at the end of shoelaces (fun fact: they’re called … Continue reading Stem cell stories that caught our eye: insights into stem cell biology through telomeres, reprogramming and lung disease

Wiping out a cell’s identity shifts cellular reprogramming into high gear

If stretched out end to end, the DNA in just one cell of your body would reach a whopping six feet in length. A complex cellular structure called chromatin – made up of coils upon coils of DNA and protein – makes it possible to fit all that DNA into a single cell nucleus that’s … Continue reading Wiping out a cell’s identity shifts cellular reprogramming into high gear

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: three teams refine cell reprogramming, also stem cell tourism

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun. Why stem cells in the lab don’t grow up right. A classic cartoon among stem cell fans shows a stem cell telling a daughter cell … Continue reading Stem cell stories that caught our eye: three teams refine cell reprogramming, also stem cell tourism

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: potentially safer cell reprogramming, hair follicle cells become nerve and liver stem cells

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun. A potentially safer way to reprogram cells. Ever since then soon-to-be Nobel Prize winner Shinya Yamanaka showed how to reprogram adult cells to an embryonic … Continue reading Stem cell stories that caught our eye: potentially safer cell reprogramming, hair follicle cells become nerve and liver stem cells

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: good fat vs. bad fat, the black box of cell reprogramming and Parkinson’s

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun. One day a pill might turn bad fat into good fat. For a few years now several research teams have linked white fat to the … Continue reading Stem cell stories that caught our eye: good fat vs. bad fat, the black box of cell reprogramming and Parkinson’s

More Than Meets the Eye: Protein that Keeps Cancer in Check also Plays Direct Role in Stem Cell Biology, a Stanford Study Finds.

Here’s a startling fact: the retinoblastoma protein —Rb, for short — is defective or missing in nearly all cancers. Rb is called a tumor suppressor because it prevents excessive cell growth by acting as a crucial traffic stop for the cell cycle, a process that controls the timing for a cell to divide and multiply. … Continue reading More Than Meets the Eye: Protein that Keeps Cancer in Check also Plays Direct Role in Stem Cell Biology, a Stanford Study Finds.