HIV eliminated from mice using CRISPR and LASER ART

In the United States alone, there are approximately 1.1 million people living with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a virus that weakens the immune system by destroying important cells that fight off disease and infection. This number is much larger on a global scale, with 36.9 million people living with HIV as of 2017. If left … Continue reading HIV eliminated from mice using CRISPR and LASER ART

Stanford scientist uses CRISPR-Cas9 and stem cells to develop potential “bubble baby” therapy

Our immune system is an important and essential part of everyday life. It is crucial for fighting off colds and, with the help of vaccinations, gives us immunity to potentially lethal diseases. Unfortunately, for some infants, this innate bodily defense mechanism is not present or is severely lacking in function. This condition is known as … Continue reading Stanford scientist uses CRISPR-Cas9 and stem cells to develop potential “bubble baby” therapy

CRISPR-Cas9 101: an overview and the role it plays in developing therapies

There has been a lot of conversation surrounding CRISPR-Cas9 in these recent months as well as many sensational news stories. Some of these stories highlight the promise this technology holds, while others emphasize a word of caution. But what exactly does this technology do and how does it work? Here is a breakdown that will … Continue reading CRISPR-Cas9 101: an overview and the role it plays in developing therapies

CRISPR Gene Editing Tool Linked to Unexpected Collateral DNA Damage

  CRISPR–Cas9 has been widely hailed as the gene editing tool of the future. But research, published in the journal Nature Biotechnology,  about the effects of CRISPR/Cas9, have found it can cause unexpected genetic damage which could lead to dangerous changes in some cells. Scientists have also learned there may be some safety implications for … Continue reading CRISPR Gene Editing Tool Linked to Unexpected Collateral DNA Damage

For the first time, scientists entirely reprogram human skin cells to iPSCs using CRISPR

Back in 2012, Shinya Yamanaka was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his group’s identification of “Yamanaka Factors,” a group of genes that are capable of turning ordinary skin cells into induced pluripotentent stem cells (iPSCs) which have the ability to become any type of cell within the body. Discovery of iPSCs … Continue reading For the first time, scientists entirely reprogram human skin cells to iPSCs using CRISPR

Stem Cell Roundup: Rainbow Sherbet Fruit Fly Brains, a CRISPR/iPSC Mash-up and more

This week’s Round Up is all about the brain with some CRISPR and iPSCs sprinkled in: Our Cool Stem Cell Image of the Week comes from Columbia University’s Zuckerman Institute: This rainbow sherbet-colored scientific art is a microscopy image of a fruit fly nervous system in which brain cells were randomly labeled with different colors. … Continue reading Stem Cell Roundup: Rainbow Sherbet Fruit Fly Brains, a CRISPR/iPSC Mash-up and more

A new study suggests CRISPR gene editing therapies should be customized for each patient

You know a scientific advance is a big deal when it becomes the main premise and title of a Jennifer Lopez-produced TV drama. That’s the case for CRISPR, a revolutionary gene-editing technology that promises to yield treatments for a wide range of genetic diseases. In fact, clinical trials using the CRISPR method are already underway … Continue reading A new study suggests CRISPR gene editing therapies should be customized for each patient

Stories that caught our eye last week: dying cells trigger stem cells, CRISPR videogames and an obesity-stem cell link

A dying cell’s last breath triggers stem cell division. Most cells in your body are in a constant state of turnover. The cells of your lungs, for instance, replace themselves every 2 to 3 weeks and, believe it or not, you get a new intestine every 2 to 3 days. We can thank adult stem cells … Continue reading Stories that caught our eye last week: dying cells trigger stem cells, CRISPR videogames and an obesity-stem cell link

Scientists fix heart disease mutation in human embryos using CRISPR

Last week the scientific community was buzzing with the news that US scientists had genetically modified human embryos using CRISPR gene editing technology. While the story broke before the research was published, many journalists and news outlets weighed in on the study’s findings and the ethical implications they raise. We covered this initial burst of … Continue reading Scientists fix heart disease mutation in human embryos using CRISPR

Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: CRISPRing Human Embryos, brain stem cells slow aging & BrainStorm ALS trial joins CIRM Alpha Clinics

Here are the stem cell stories that caught our eye this week. Enjoy! Scientists claim first CRISPR editing of human embryos in the US. Here’s the big story this week. Scientists from Portland, Oregon claim they genetically modified human embryos using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology. While their results have yet to be published in … Continue reading Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: CRISPRing Human Embryos, brain stem cells slow aging & BrainStorm ALS trial joins CIRM Alpha Clinics