Gene found to activate muscle stem cells in mice with muscular dystrophy

Julie Saba grew up with a father who was a muscle biochemist and, out of rebellion, she swore she’d never go into research, especially muscle research. She was just going to be a doctor. A doctor who, years later, did run a research lab, but in cancer. Then, when studying a particularly interesting gene involved … Continue reading Gene found to activate muscle stem cells in mice with muscular dystrophy

Researchers find connection between aging muscles and mutations in stem cells

It’s a humbling fact of life that our muscles decline as we age which is why you didn’t see any 50-year-olds competing for Olympic Gold in figure skating at the 2018 Winter Games. You can blame your muscle stem cells for this. Also called satellite cells, these adult stem cells lie mostly dormant in muscle … Continue reading Researchers find connection between aging muscles and mutations in stem cells

Stem Cell Stories that Caught Our Eye: GPS for Skin & Different Therapies for Aging vs. Injured Muscles?

Skin stem cells specialize into new skin by sensing neighborhood crowding When embarking on a road trip, the GPS technology inside our smartphones helps us know where we are and how to get where we’re going. The stem cells buried in the deepest layers of our skin don’t have a GPS and yet, they do … Continue reading Stem Cell Stories that Caught Our Eye: GPS for Skin & Different Therapies for Aging vs. Injured Muscles?

An unexpected link: immune cells send muscle injury signal to activate stem cell regeneration

We’ve written many blogs over the years about research focused on muscle stem cell function . Those stories describe how satellite cells, another name for muscle stem cells, lay dormant but jump into action to grow new muscle cells in response to injury and damage. And when satellite function breaks down with aging as well as … Continue reading An unexpected link: immune cells send muscle injury signal to activate stem cell regeneration

Scientists find new stem cell target for regenerating aging muscles

Today I’m going to use our former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as an example of what happens to our muscles when we age. One of Arnold’s many talents when he was younger was being a professional bodybuilder. As you can see in this photo, Arnold worked hard to generate an impressive amount of muscle that landed … Continue reading Scientists find new stem cell target for regenerating aging muscles

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: growing muscle, new blood vessels and pacemakers and Tommy John surgery

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun. Better way to grow muscle.  The specialized stem cells responsible for repairing muscle, the satellite cells, have always been difficult to grow in large quantities … Continue reading Stem cell stories that caught our eye: growing muscle, new blood vessels and pacemakers and Tommy John surgery

CIRM-Funded Scientists Test Recipe for Building New Muscles

When muscles get damaged due to disease or injury, the body activates its reserves—muscle stem cells that head to the injury site and mature into fully functioning muscle cells. But when the reserves are all used up, things get tricky. This is especially the case for people living with muscle diseases, such as muscular dystrophy, … Continue reading CIRM-Funded Scientists Test Recipe for Building New Muscles

ISSCR 2014: If we learn how to help our stem cells keep their balance we might reduce the effects of aging

The effects of aging come from a decline in our stem cells’ ability to do their job. Four speakers on the second day of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) conference laid out how this happens and showed the results of some early attempts to make our aging stem cells perform like young … Continue reading ISSCR 2014: If we learn how to help our stem cells keep their balance we might reduce the effects of aging

Young stem cells’ DNA has more genes switched to "on" position than geriatric ones

Skeletal muscle courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Researchers at Stanford University have made a start in understanding why muscles in younger people heal so quickly compared to muscles in older people. Understanding these differences could help scientists find ways of helping muscles in older people heal more quickly after injuries. In a study comparing muscle stem … Continue reading Young stem cells’ DNA has more genes switched to "on" position than geriatric ones