Stem cell stories that caught our eye: organ replacement, ovarian cancer and repairing damaged hearts.

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Numbers on organ shortage and review of lab replacements.
Vox, the four-month-old web site, is rapidly becoming a credible news source with more than five million page views so far. With a reputation for explaining the facts behind the news, it was nice to see they tackled the organ shortage and how researchers are using stem cells to try to solve it.

organ shortage.0After providing data on the incredible need, the author addressed several key advances, as well as remaining hurdles, to using stem cells to build replacement organs in the lab. She notes that an important step to growing an organ is being able to grow all the various types of cells that make up a complex organ.

“Each specialized type of cell in your body needs certain chemical clues from its environment in order to thrive and multiply. And even a simple-seeming body part, like a urethra, requires more than one cell type, arranged in certain ways relative to one another.”

In addition to a chart with data on organ donation and need, the article provides a link to a fun video on growing a rat lung in the lab. The author closes with the fact that the greatest need is for kidneys and a discussion of how tough they are to make because of the complex mix of tissues needed.

An advance in building kidneys also made the journals this week, with a press release from Cellular Dynamics describing how their lab grown cells succeeded in coating the inside of blood vessels in a scaffold for a rodent kidney.

Stem cell factors heal damaged hearts. The American Heart Association met in Chicago this week and as always the week of their fall enclave generates several news stories. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News wrote up a study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York that suggested how your own stem cells might be recruited to repair damage after a heart attack.

The New York team used a form of gene therapy that introduced the genes for “stem cell factors” that they believe could summon a type of stem cell that some have suggested can repair heart muscle. Although, whether those cells, called c-Kit positive heart stem cells, are actually the cause of the repair remains a subject of debate. They did show that their treatment improved heart function and decreased heart muscle death in the rodent model they were using.

Stem cells improve survival of skin grafts.
With so many soldiers returning from deployments needing reconstructive surgery, several teams at our armed services medical institutes are trying to solve the problem of the soldiers’ immune systems rejecting large skin grafts from donors. One team reported a potentially major advance in the Journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine and the web site benzinga picked up the journal’s press release.

Working in mice the team got the best skin graft survival in animals that received two types of stem cells to induce immune tolerance to the graft. The mice received fat-derived stem cells from humans and an infusion of a small number of their own bone marrow stem cells. The grafts showed no sign of rejection after 200 days, a very long time in a mouse’s life. In the press release, the editor of the journal, Anthony Atala, suggested the results could have broad implications for the field.

“The implications of this research are broad. If these findings are duplicated in additional models and in human trials, there is potential to apply this strategy to many areas of transplantation.”

Leukemia drug may also work in ovarian cancer. The antibody named for CIRM in recognition of our funding of its discovery, cirmtuzumab, which is already in clinical trials in humans for leukemia, may also be effective in one of the most stubborn tumors, ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer cells

Ovarian cancer cells

The University of California, San Diego, team led by Thomas Kipps published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week showing that in mice the antibody kept transplanted human ovarian cancer cells in check. The tumor that is characterized by rapid spread did not metastasize at all. HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release explaining how the new drug works. You can read about the CIRM-funded clinical trial in leukemia in our fact sheet.

Versatile fingernail stem cells.
The stem cells that regrow our nails are prodigious little critters forcing us to constantly cut or file. But it turns out they are also versatile. They can stimulate nail growth but also growth of skin around the nail.

But if our nails get injured they become single minded and only make nail cells. A team at the University of Southern California has discovered that at the time of injury a particular protein signal gets turned on directing the stem cells to focus on the nails. So, the team is now looking for other signaling proteins that might direct these versatile cells to make other tissues making them potential tools for healing amputations. ScienceDaily picked up the university’s press release.

Don Gibbons

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