Moving Beyond Current CIRM Funding

Delivering on CIRM’s mission of “accelerating stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs” requires the participation of multiple stakeholders to span the research, development, and commercialization phases of bringing a new product to market. In this post, I am pleased to highlight two recent examples of CIRM-funded projects moving beyond their period of CIRM funding by establishing partnerships with industry and investors to further develop the underlying CIRM-funded technology.

In 2000, Dr. Jill Helms, an academic investigator at Stanford University, received a $6.5 million grant from CIRM under an Early Translational award. The title of Dr. Helms’ project was Enhancing Healing via Wnt-Protein Mediated Activation of Endogenous Stem Cells,” and the goal of the award was to develop a novel, protein-based therapeutic platform to accelerate and enhance tissue regeneration through activation of adult stem cells. The five-year award achieved many critical milestones along the way, including the initiation of two preclinical studies aimed at demonstrating the effectiveness of a protein called L-WNT3A to improve the success of spinal fusion surgery and to treat a degradative bone disease called osteonecrosis, both of which represent unmet medical needs.

Helms_bonegraft

Through CIRM funding, Dr. Jill Helms’ team was able to demonstrate that treatment with a protein called L-Wnt3a regenerates and promotes bone formation in animals models (Figs D,F: untreated; Figs E,G: Wnt3a treated). (image credit: Leucht et al. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013;95:1278-88)

Dr. Helms’ work attracted considerable interest from the investor community during the lifespan of her grant, and during the final year of her award Dr. Helms’ WNT3A technology platform was successfully spun out of Stanford into a newly created company called Ankasa Regenerative Therapeutics. Ankasa was established with the financial support of Avalon Ventures – a La Jolla based life sciences venture capital firm, Correlation Ventures – an analytics driven venture capital firm, and Heraeus Medical – a diversified global medical device company based in Germany with over $1 billion of annual revenue. Ankasa has raised an initial $8.5 million in the first round of the total $17 million Series A financing to continue the development of the previously CIRM-funded technology.

Moving Radially Branched Deployment_Neurosurgery_Lim

Dr. Daniel Lim’s CIRM-funded BranchPoint Device allows neurosurgeons to deliver cell based therapies to multiple areas of the brain with just one needle penetration.  (image credit: Silvestrini et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2013;91:92–103)

The second recent example comes from a CIRM Tools & Technology grant to Dr. Daniel Lim, a neurosurgeon at UCSF. Dr. Lim was awarded a $1.8 million grant to develop a more efficient device for transplanting stem cells into the brain, titled Development and Preclinical Testing of New Devices for Cell Transplantation to the Brain.” Dr. Lim successfully developed a platform technology that enables Radially Branched Deployment (RBD) of cells to multiple target locations at variable radial distances and depths along the initial brain penetration tract with real-time interventional magnetic resonance image (iMRI) guidance. This technology is a huge leap forward over the conventional and crude syringe and needle device that are typically used to inject living cells into the brain.

Dr. Lim’s work attracted the attention of Accurexa, a publicly traded medical device company that licensed the CIRM-funded technology from UCSF. Under the guidance of Accurexa, a 510(k) application was submitted to the FDA for the newly coined “BranchPoint Device.” In June of this year, Accurexa successfully raised $2.5 million in equity financing to continue the development and for commercialization of the BranchPoint Device.

Overall, there remains a lack of industry pull for early stage stem cell technologies, however, both Drs. Helms and Lim’s stories represent successful examples of CIRM providing public dollars for early stage research with the resulting potentially life-saving applications attracting interest from investors and companies. These new investors will further fund and develop the technologies well beyond current CIRM funding and, assuming they are successful, deliver them to patients with unmet medical needs.

Creaky Cell Machinery Affects the Aging Immune System, CIRM-Funded Study Finds

Why do our immune systems weaken over time? Why are people over the age of 60 more susceptible to life-threatening infections and many forms of cancer? There’s no one answer to these questions—but scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have uncovered an important mechanism behind this phenomenon.

Reporting in the latest issue of the journal Nature, UCSF’s Dr. Emmanuelle Passegué and her team describe how blood and immune cells must be continually replenished over the lifetime of an organism. As that organism ages the complex cellular machinery that churns out new cells begins to falter. And when that happens, the body can become more susceptible to deadly infections, such as pneumonia.

As Passegué so definitively put it in a UCSF news release:

“We have found the cellular mechanism responsible for the inability of blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in an old organism, and have identified molecular defects that could be restored for rejuvenation therapies.”

The research team, which examined this mechanism in old mice, focused their efforts on hematopoetic stem cells—a type of stem cell that is responsible for producing new blood and immune cells. These stem cells are present throughout an organism’s lifetime, regularly dividing to preserve their own numbers.

Molecular tags of DNA damage are highlighted in green in blood-forming stem cells. [Credit: UCSF]

Molecular tags of DNA damage are highlighted in green in blood-forming stem cells. [Credit: UCSF]

But in an aging organism, these cells’ ability to generate new copies is not as good as it used to be. When the research team dug deeper they found a key bit of cellular machinery, called the mini-chromosome maintenance helicase, breaks down. When that happens, the DNA inside the cell can’t replicate itself properly—and the newly generated cell is not running on all cylinders.

One of the first things that these old stem cells lose as a result is their ability to make B cells. B cells, a key component of the immune system, normally make antibodies that fight infection. As B cell numbers dwindle in an aging organism, so too does their ability to fight infection. As a result the organism’s risk for contracting dangerous illnesses skyrockets.

This research, which was funded in part by CIRM, not only informs what goes wrong in an aging organism at the molecular level, but also points to new targets that could keep these stem cells functioning at full capacity, helping promote so-called ‘healthy aging.’ As Passegué added:

“Everybody talks about healthier aging. The decline of stem-cell function is a big part of age-related problems. Achieving longer lives relies in part on achieving a better understanding of why stem cells are not able to maintain optimal functioning.”