Stem cells could offer hope for deadly childhood muscle wasting disease

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a particularly nasty rare and fatal disease. It predominantly affects boys, slowly robbing them of their ability to control their muscles. By 10 years of age, boys with DMD start to lose the ability to walk; by 12, most need a wheelchair to get around. Eventually they become paralyzed, and need round-the-clock care.

There are no effective long-term treatments and the average life expectancy is just 25.

Crucial discovery

Duchenne MD team

DMD Research team: Photo courtesy Ottawa Hospital Research Inst.

But now researchers in Canada have made a discovery that could pave the way to new approaches to treating DMD. In a study published in the journal Nature Medicine, they show that DMD is caused by defective muscle stem cells.

In a news release Dr. Michael Rudnicki, senior author of the study, says this discovery is completely changing the way they think about the condition:

“For nearly 20 years, we’ve thought that the muscle weakness observed in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily due to problems in their muscle fibers, but our research shows that it is also due to intrinsic defects in the function of their muscle stem cells. This completely changes our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and could eventually lead to far more effective treatments.”

Loss and confused

DMD is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the loss of a protein called dystrophin. Rudnicki and his team found that without dystrophin muscle stem cells – which are responsible for repairing damage after injury – produce far fewer functional muscle fibers. The cells are also confused about where they are:

“Muscle stem cells that lack dystrophin cannot tell which way is up and which way is down. This is crucial because muscle stem cells need to sense their environment to decide whether to produce more stem cells or to form new muscle fibers. Without this information, muscle stem cells cannot divide properly and cannot properly repair damaged muscle.”

While the work was done in mice the researchers are confident it will also apply to humans, as the missing protein is almost identical in all animals.

Next steps

The researchers are already looking for ways they can use this discovery to develop new treatments for DMD, hopefully one day turning it from a fatal condition, to a chronic one.

Dr. Ronald Worton, the co-discoverer of the DMD gene in 1987, says this discovery has been a long-time coming but is both welcome and exciting:

“When we discovered the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, there was great hope that we would be able to develop a new treatment fairly quickly. This has been much more difficult than we initially thought, but Dr. Rudnicki’s research is a major breakthrough that should renew hope for researchers, patients and families.”

In this video CIRM grantee, Dr. Helen Blau from Stanford University, talks about a new mouse model created by her lab that more accurately mimics the Duchenne symptoms observed in people. This opens up opportunities to better understand the disease and to develop new therapies.






How do you know if they really know what they’re saying “yes” to?

How can you not love something titled “Money, Mischief and Science.” It just smacks of intrigue and high stakes.

And when the rest of the title is “What Have We Learned About Doing Stem Cell Research?” you have an altogether intriguing topic for a panel discussion.

Sue and Bill Gross Hall: Photo by Hoang Xuan Pham/ UC Irvine

Sue and Bill Gross Hall: Photo by Hoang Xuan Pham/ UC Irvine

That panel – featuring CIRM’s own Dr. Geoff Lomax, a regular contributor to The Stem Cellar – is just one element in a day-long event at the University of California, Irvine this Friday, November 13.

Super Symposium

The 2015 Stem Cell Symposium: “The Challenge of Informed Consent in Times of Controversy” looks at some of the problems researchers, companies, institutions and organizations face when trying to put together a clinical trial.

In many cases the individuals who want to sign up for a clinical trial involving the use of stem cells are facing life-threatening diseases or problems. Often they have tried every other option available and this trial may be their last hope. So how can you ensure that they fully understand the risks involved in signing up for a trial?

Equally important is that many of the trials now underway now are Phase 1 trials. The main goal of this kind of trial is to show that the therapy is safe and so the number of cells they use is often too small to have any obvious benefit to the patient. So how can you explain that to a patient who may chose to ignore your caveats and focus instead on the hope, distant as it may be, that this could help them?

Challenging questions

The symposium will feature experts in the fields of science, law, technology and ethics as they consider:

  • Does informed consent convey different meanings depending on who invokes the term?
  • When do we know that consent is informed?
  • What are human research subjects entitled to know before, during and after agreeing to participate in clinical trials?
  • How might the pushback on fetal tissue research impact the scientific development of vaccines, research on Alzheimer’s disease or other medical advancements?

So if you are looking for something thought provoking and engaging to do this Friday, here you are:

“The Challenge of Informed Consent in Times of Controversy,” Friday, Nov. 13, 9am – 4:30pm, at the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center on the University of California, Irvine campus.

The symposium will be livestreamed, and a video recording will be available on following the event.

REGISTER: The symposium is free to UCI student, staff and faculty. There is a $20 registration fee for non-UCI attendees. Visit the event page to register.

Gene editing in blood stem cells just got easier

Genome editing is a field of science that’s been around for awhile, but has experienced an explosion of activity and interest in recent years. Chances are that even your grandmother has heard about the recent story where for the first time, gene editing saved a one-year-old girl from dying of leukemia.

Microsoft word versus genome editing

To give you an idea of what this technique involves, think back to the last time you had to write a report. You let all your ideas flow out onto the page, but then realize that certain sentences or paragraphs need to be rearranged, removed, or added. So you copy, paste, and move stuff around with your mouse and keyboard until you’re satisfied.

Image source: Broad Institute

Image source: Broad Institute

Tools for editing the genome (which contain all of our genes) work a similar way, but they cut and paste DNA sequences in the human genome instead of words on a page. Scientists have figured out how to use these “genetic scissors” to delete genes (so they no longer have function) and to correct disease-causing mutations (by pasting in the normal DNA sequence of a gene to restore function). Both these abilities make genome editing a highly valuable tool for scientists to model diseases and to develop therapies to treat them.

There are multiple tools that researchers are currently using to modify the human genome. The main ones are fancifully named ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPRs. All three use engineered proteins called nucleases to cut strands of DNA at specific locations in the genome. A cell’s DNA repair machinery will then either glue the DNA strands back together (this typically results in the loss of DNA and gene function), or repair the break by copying and pasting in the missing sequence of DNA from a template (you can correct disease-causing mutations this way by providing a donor template). We don’t have time to get into more details about how these tools work, but you can learn more by reading this fact sheet from Science Media Centre.

Some cells are more stubborn than others

While genome editing technologies offer many advantages for modifying human genes, it’s not a perfect science. There are still many limitations and roadblocks that need to be addressed to make sure that these tools can be safely and effectively used as therapies in humans.

Besides the obvious worry about “off-target effects” (when the genetic scissors cut random sections of DNA, which can cause big problems), another issue with genome editing tools is that some types of cells are harder to genetically modify than others.

Such is the case with blood stem cells, also known as hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), that live in our bone marrow and make all the different blood cells in our body. Initial studies reported difficulty in delivering genome editing tools into human HSPCs, which is a problem if you want to use these tools to help cure patients suffering from genetic blood or immune diseases.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Have no fear, blood-stem cell editing is here

We are happy to inform you that a CIRM-funded study published today in Nature Biotechnology has developed a solution to the problem of hard-to-edit blood stem cells. Scientists from the USC Keck School of Medicine and from Sangamo BioSciences developed a new delivery method that allows for efficient genome editing of human HSPCs using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs).

They used a viral delivery system to deliver ZFNs to distinct locations in the genome of HSPCs and successfully inserted a gene sequence that made the cells turn green under a fluorescent microscope. The virus they used was a harmless form of an adeno-associated virus (AAV), which can enter certain cells and delivery the researcher’s DNA cargo with a very low chance of altering or inserting its own DNA into the HSPC genome.

Using an AAV that was exceptionally good at entering HPSCs, they virally delivered ZFNs to specific gene locations in HSPCs that had been isolated from human blood and from fetal liver tissue. They found that delivering the ZFNs as mRNA molecules allowed the protein versions they turned into to be temporarily expressed in HSPCs. This produced a high rate of gene insertion (ranging from 15-40% of cells treated), while keeping off-target effects and cell death low. Even the most hard-to-edit HSPCs, called the primitive HSPCs, were modified. This result was really exciting because no other study has reported gene editing with this level of efficiency in this primitive population of blood stem cells.

The tools work but what about the cells?

After proving that they were able to successfully edit the genomes of HSPCs with high efficiency, they next asked whether the modified cells could grow in culture and create new blood cells when transplanted into mice.

While their method to deliver ZFNs into the HSPCs did cause some of the cells to die (around 20%), the majority that survived were able to multiply in a dish and specialize into various blood cells when grown in cultures. When the modified HSPCs were taken a step further and transplanted into immune-deficient mice (meaning their immune system is compromised and won’t attack transplanted cells), they not only survived, but they also specialized into many different types of blood cells while still retaining their genomic modifications.

Now here is where I want to give the researchers a high five. They decided that once wasn’t enough, and challenged their modified HSPCs to a second round of transplantation. They collected the bone marrow from mice that received the first transplant of modified HSPCs, and transferred it into another immune-deficient mouse. Five months later, they found that the modified cells were still there and had generated other blood cell types. Because these modified HSPCs lasted for so long and through two rounds of transplants, the authors concluded that they had successfully edited the primitive, long-term repopulating HSPCs.

Next stop, the clinic?

In summary, this study offers a new and improved method to genetically modify blood stem cells in all their forms.

So what’s next? The obvious hope is the clinic.


HIV (yellow) infecting a human immune cell. Photo credit: Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, NIH.

It’s a likely future as the study was conducted in collaboration with Sangamo BioSciences. They specialize in ZFN-mediated gene therapy and have a number of preclinical therapeutic programs, many of which focus on genetic diseases that affect the blood and immune system, as well as ongoing clinical trials using ZFNs to treat patients with HIV/AIDs. (One of these trials is funded by CIRM, read more here).

In a USC press release, Dr. Michael Holmes, VP of Research at Sangamo and co-senior author on the paper hinted at future clinical applications:

Michael Holmes, Sangamo BioSciences

Michael Holmes, Sangamo BioSciences


Our results provide a strategy for broadening the application of gene editing technologies in HSPCs. This significantly advances our progress towards applying gene editing to the treatment of human diseases of the blood and immune systems.



Co-senior author and USC Professor Dr. Paula Cannon echoed Dr. Holmes:

Gene therapy using HSPCs has enormous potential for treating HIV and other diseases of the blood and immune systems.

One last question

A question that I had after reading this exciting study was whether other genome editing tools such as CRISPR could produce better results in blood stem cells using a similar viral delivery method.

CRISPR is described as a faster, cheaper, and easier gene editing technology compared to ZFNs and TALENS (for a comparison, check out this fun article by The Jackson Laboratory). And many scientists, both in academia and industry, are pushing CRISPR gene editing towards clinical applications.

When I asked Paula Cannon about which gene editing technology, ZFNs or CRISPRs, is better for therapeutic development, she said:

Paula Cannon, USC Professor

Paula Cannon, USC Professor

In terms of advantages, CRISPRs are easier to work with initially, and this makes them a great lab research tool. But when it comes to developing something for a clinical trial, its much more of a long game, so that initial advantage disappears. The ZFNs I work with have been previously optimized and are well characterized, and the CCR5 ZFNs are already in the clinic so they have a big advantage in that regard when you are trying to develop something for the next clinical application.

Related Links:

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: cancer fighting virus, lab-grown guts work in dogs, stem cell trial to cure HIV

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Cancer fighting virus approved for melanoma

(Disclaimer: While this isn’t a story about stem cells, it’s pretty cool so I had to include it.)

The term “virus” generally carries a negative connotation, but in some cases, viruses can be the good guys. This was the case on Tuesday when our drug approval agency, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the use of a cancer fighting virus for the treatment of advanced stage melanoma (skin cancer).

The virus, called T-VEC, is a modified version of the herpesvirus, which causes a number of diseases and symptoms including painful blisters and sores in the mouth. Scientists engineered this virus to specifically infect cancer cells and not healthy cells. Once inside cancer cells, T-VEC does what a virus normally does and wreaks havoc by attacking and killing the tumor.

The beauty of this T-VEC is that in the process of killing cancer cells, it causes the release of a factor called GM-CSF from the cancer cells. This factor signals the human immune system that other cancer cells are nearby and they should be attacked and killed by the soldiers of the immune system known as T-cells. The reason why cancers are so deadly is because they can trick the immune system into not recognizing them as bad guys. T-VEC rips off their usual disguise and makes them vulnerable again to attack.

T-VEC recruits immune cells (orange) to attack cancer cells (pink) credit Dr. Andrejs Liepins/SPL

T-VEC recruits immune cells (orange) to attack cancer cells (pink). Photo credit Dr. Andrejs Liepins/SPL.

This is exciting news for cancer patients and was covered in many news outlets. Nature News wrote a great article, which included the history of how we came to use viruses as tools to attack cancer. The piece also discussed options for improving current T-VEC therapy. Currently, the virus is injected directly into the cancer tumor, but scientists hope that one day, it could be delivered intravenously, or through the bloodstream, so that it can kill hard to reach tumors or ones that have spread to other parts of the body. The article suggested combining T-VEC with other cancer immunotherapies (therapies that help the immune system recognize cancer cells) or delivering a personalized “menu” of cancer-killing viruses to treat patients with different types of cancers.

As a side note, CIRM is also interested in fighting advanced stage melanoma and recently awarded $17.7 million to Caladrius Biosciences to conduct a Phase 3 clinical trial with their melanoma killing vaccine. For more, check out our recent blog.

Lab-grown guts work in mice and dogs

If you ask what’s trending right now in stem cell research, one of the topics that surely would pop up is 3D organoids. Also known as “mini-organs”, organoids are tiny models of human organs generated from human stem cells in a dish. To make them, scientists have developed detailed protocols that sometimes involve the use of biological scaffolds (structures on which cells can attach and grow).

A study published in Regenerative Medicine and picked up by Science described the generation of “lab-grown gut” organoids using intestine-shaped scaffolds. Scientists from Johns Hopkins figured out how to grow intestinal lining that had the correct anatomy and functioned properly when transplanted into mice and dogs. Previous studies in this area used flat scaffolds or dishes to grow gut organoids, which weren’t able to form proper functional gut lining.

Lab-grown guts could help humans with gut disorders. (Shaffiey et al., 2015)

Lab-grown guts could help humans with gut disorders. (Shaffiey et al., 2015)

What was their secret recipe? The scientists took stem cells from the intestines of human infants or mice and poured a sticky solution of them onto a scaffold made of suture-like material. The stem cells then grew into healthy gut tissue over the next few weeks and formed tube structures that were similar to real intestines.

They tested whether their mini-guts worked by transplanting them into mice and dogs. To their excitement, the human and mouse lab-grown guts were well tolerated and worked properly in mice, and in dogs that had a portion of their intestine removed. Even more exciting was an observation made by senior author David Hackham:

“The scaffold was well tolerated and promoted healing by recruiting stem cells. [The dogs] had a perfectly normal lining after 8 weeks.”

The obvious question about this study is whether these lab-grown guts will one day help humans with debilitating intestinal diseases like Crohn’s and IBS (inflammatory bowel disorder). Hackam said that while they are still a long way from taking their technology to the clinic, “in the future, scaffolds could be custom-designed for individual human patients to replace a portion of an intestine or the entire organ.”

Clinical trial using umbilical cord stem cells to treat HIV

This week, the first clinical trial using human umbilical cord stem cells to treat HIV patients was announced in Spain. The motivation of this trial is the previous success of the Berlin Patient, Timothy Brown.

The Berlin patient can be described as the holy grail of HIV research. He is an American man who suffered from leukemia, a type of blood cancer, but was also HIV-positive. When his doctor in Berlin treated his leukemia with a stem cell transplant from a bone-marrow donor, he chose a special donor whose stem cells had an inherited mutation in their DNA that made them resistant to infection by the HIV virus. Surprisingly, after the procedure, Timothy was cured of both his cancer AND his HIV infection.

Berlin patient Timothy Brown. Photo credit: Griffin Boyce/Flickr.

Berlin patient Timothy Brown. Photo credit: Griffin Boyce/Flickr.

The National Organization of Transplants (ONT) in Spain references this discovery as its impetus to conduct a stem cell clinical trial to treat patients with HIV and hopefully cure them of this deadly virus. The trial will use umbilical cord blood stem cells instead of bone-marrow stem cells from 157 blood donors that have the special HIV-resistance genetic mutation.

In coverage from Tech Times, the president of the Spanish Society of Hematology and Hemotherapy, Jose Moraleda, was quoted saying:

“This project can put us at the cutting edge of this field within the world of science. It will allow us to gain more knowledge about HIV and parallel offer us a potential option for curing a poorly diagnosed malignant hematological disease.”

The announcement for the clinical trial was made at the Haematology conference in Valencia, and ONT hopes to treat its first patient in December or January.

From Stem Cells to Cures with Shinya Yamanaka and Google Ventures

How do you go from basic stem cell research to cures for patients? We ask this question everyday at CIRM, and we’re not alone in our tireless pursuit to find answers to this challenging question.

In fact, two leaders on different sides of the stem cell arena – research and investment – came together last week at the Gladstone Institutes’ Fall Symposium to discuss how stem cell research can be translated into effective cures.

Nobel prize winner, Dr. Shinya Yamanaka, and Google Ventures partner and Stanford PhD, Dr. Blake Byers, shared their thoughts on where stem cell research is now and the future of stem cell therapy for treating and curing disease.

iPS Cells and the Stem Cell Revolution

Gladstone President, Sandy Williams

Gladstone President, Sandy Williams

President of the Gladstone Institutes, Dr. Sandy Williams, laid the groundwork for the symposium by outlining ways that stem cell research, especially Dr. Yamanaka’s discovery of cellular reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, will lead to cures.

“Cellular reprogramming has really launched the stem cell revolution. There are three pathways that stem cell biology or cellular reprogramming can be turned into new medicines. Cellular transplantation, reprogramming cells inside the body, and cellular models of human disease created by cellular reprogramming are all different routes to cures.”

He followed with the point that the success of the stem cell revolution cannot rest solely on the shoulders of scientists and clinicians. He said, “the best science will never be a cure unless it passes into the commercial arena. It has to pass through venture investors, biotechnology companies, and pharmaceutical companies, device companies for scientific advances to help human beings.”

Yamanaka on iPS Cell Applications

Dr. Shinya Yamanaka

Dr. Shinya Yamanaka

Yamanaka covered the research side of the discussion and shared a heartwarming story about his father inspiring him to pursue medicine before delving into the applications of his Nobel prize winning technology.

After becoming a doctor, Yamanaka continued his training as a scientist, but not without significant hurdles to overcome before his career-defining success.

I had a clear vision, I wanted to help patients by doing medical research. But of course, it’s easy to say, but very difficult to achieve. I spent many hours, many days, and many years in laboratories without significant success. 20 years later however, I became extremely lucky to have a wonderful group of people. And that group developed a new technology. Our group was able to find a way to make a new type of stem cell, which we designated iPS cells.

He then discussed the power of iPS cell technology and how scientists can turn patient iPS cells into almost any cell type in the body. He also emphasized two major medical applications of iPS cells that will lead to cures.

iPS cells are very powerful. We can use these cells for two major medical applications. We can transplant healthy brain cells [derived from iPS cells] back into the patients brains to obtain functional recovery. This approach is known as regenerative medicine or cell therapy. We’ve been trying to apply this approach of cell therapy to many diseases and injuries, for example, eye diseases such as macular degeneration, brain diseases such as PD, and also spinal cord injury, heart failure, liver failure, and diabetes. Also we’ve been trying to make immune cells, or lymphocytes, that attack cancer cells from iPS cells as a new form of cancer therapy. This is the first medical application of iPS cells. Another yet equally important application of iPS cells is in drug discovery. Instead of transplanting back into patients, we can use iPS cells and brain cells or heart cells derived from iPS cells in laboratories at the universities, Gladstone Institutes, or pharmaceutical companies to make disease models to perform drug screening.

Yamanaka ended his speech with his big picture goal. “We really want to bring iPS cells to patients, and we really want to help patients by using iPS cells. Of course we still have a long long way to go, and we need to overcome many problems.”

Byers on Facing Stem Cell Hurdles Because It’s Worth it

On the investment and capital side, Blake Byers from Google Ventures discussed why stem cell research should be pursued even though the obstacles in our path to cures can be daunting.

Blake Byers, Google Ventures

Blake Byers, Google Ventures

While Byers has been on the “evil capitalist side of the world” for the past five years, he has been “taking soul supplements by continuing to do research at Stanford University.” His most recent scientific publication was published in July on generating dopaminergic neurons from human iPS cells and transplanting them into rats with Parkinson’s disease. Using a cutting-edge technology called optogenetics, Byers was able to manipulate the activity of these transplanted neurons in the rat brain using light and fiber optic cables. He said this experience was his “first foray into the power that stem cells have in a therapeutic capacity.”

He then explained why iPS cells show more promise as cures than other therapeutic avenues.

So why work with these stem cells if they are so much harder to work with than just a small molecule or some chemical that we bake up in the laboratory? The reason is because cells have something that none of these other molecules do. Cells have logic embedded into them. They have the ability to respond to their environment, integrate that response, and come up with their own intervention on our behalf. [With cells] we can start to think about things that biology doesn’t even do yet. So not only can we cure diseases as they arise, but we can start thinking about prevention of disease before it arises.

Byers then gave an example of how stem cells will benefit cancer therapy.

On the cancer side, we can take cells out of the body and train them to look for cancer, and then put them back in. They then go and hunt for those cancer cells and eradicate them. This work is being done by many labs. There’s a number of companies working on this strategy that are public companies that are valued in the billions, which gets capitalists like me very excited. And it’s just the beginning of a new field on the cancer side.

(For an example of this, see our just-approved clinical trail for glioblastoma)

Finally, Byers admitted that the stem cell field itself is far from putting stem cells and their derivatives into humans routinely, and that “there’s going to be lots of stuff that’s going to be difficult about this process. It’s going to be hard, but it will be worth it. So that means we should try to do this, and that’s the exact reason we are excited to be working in this field and very actively looking at companies in this general field of stem cells attempting to cure diseases.”

From Stem Cells to Cures

After listening to both Yamanaka and Byers, it was clear that both had the same view of the stem cell field. They both believe that we are at a turning point in stem cell research and that our efforts both at the bench and on the commercial side need to remain stalwart in their efforts to push stem cell research forward so we can develop safe and effective therapies for patients.

Blake Byers, Shinya Yamanaka, and Sandy Williams take questions from the audience.

Blake Byers, Shinya Yamanaka, and Sandy Williams take questions from the audience.

One comment from the audience that stood out was that the the main limitation to the success of stem cell research seems to be a reduction in funding at the very time we need to increase funding.

In response, Byers agreed and suggested that to fix the funding issue, there needs to be an objective function in stem cell research. He suggested that the field needs to “measure the output we are having and what the impact of it is.” He said what is currently lacking is an ability to “measure of that return on investment for society”.

Yamanaka followed up by addressing the issue of costs for cures. “The cost of new cures and medicines is extremely challenging but important. We now have many new medicines, but they are too expensive. How to lower those costs, [is a question] we seriously need to consider”.


Don Reed Reflects on the California Stem Cell Initiative

StemCellBattlesCoverYesterday was stem cell awareness day. In honor of this important event, Don Reed held a book reading at CIRM for his newly released book, STEM CELL BATTLES: Proposition 71 and Beyond: How Ordinary People Can Fight Back Against the Crushing Burden of Chronic Disease.

Don has worn many hats during his life. He’s been a power lifter, a diver at Sea World, and is one of California’s most tenacious stem cell research advocates. His stem cell journey began when his son, Roman Reed, was seriously injured in a football accident, leaving him mostly paralyzed from the neck down.

Both Don and Roman didn’t let this tragic event ruin their lives or steal their hope. In fact, both Don and his son were instrumental for getting proposition 71 to pass, leading to the birth of CIRM and new hope for patients with uncured diseases.

At yesterday’s book reading, Don chronicled the early battles to get human stem cell research off the ground in California, the progress that’s been made so far and the promise for future therapies. It was truly an inspiring event, bringing together patients, friends of Don and his wife Gloria, and CIRM scientists to celebrate the stem cell research accomplishments of the past ten years.


Enjoy more pictures of the event below and a short video of Jonathan Thomas, Chair of the Governing Board of CIRM, who said a few words in praise of Don Reed’s efforts to fight for stem cell research in California.


Don Reed and his wife Gloria share a smile with CIRM’s Pat Olson.


Jonathan Thomas and Don Reed.

Related links:

Happy Stem Cell Awareness Day!

SCAD_Logo_2015I woke up today extra early this morning feeling like a kid at Christmas time because it’s Stem Cell Awareness day!

This exciting day brings together organizations and people around the world working to ensure that we realize the benefits of one of the most promising fields of science in our time. The day is a unique global opportunity to foster greater understanding about stem cell research and the range of potential applications for disease and injury.

For the millions of people around the world who suffer from incurable diseases and injury, Stem Cell Awareness Day is a day to celebrate the scientific advances made to-date and be hopeful of what is yet to come.

Institutions and scientists around the world will be participating in talks and activities that celebrate and also educate the community about stem cell research. For a list of events, check out our Stem Cell Awareness Day webpage. You can also follow other events on twitter by following the hashtags #stemcellday and #astemcellscientistbecause.

In celebration of this exciting day, the Stem Cellar team would like to highlight a few videos and webpages dedicated to stem cell awareness. Enjoy!


“A Stem Cell Story” from our friends at EuroStemCell

#AStemCellScientistBecause videos via Cell Stem Cell on twitter


Stem Cell Awareness Webpages:

Stem cells and prostate cancer are more similar than we thought

Prostate cancer is a scary word for men, no matter how macho or healthy they are. These days however, prostate cancer is no longer a death sentence for them. In fact, many men survive this disease if diagnosed early. However, for those unlucky ones who have more advanced stages of prostate cancer (where the tumor has metastasized and spread to other organs), the typical treatments used to fight the tumors don’t work effectively because advanced tumors become resistant to these therapies.

To help those afflicted with late stage prostate cancer, scientists are trying to understand the nature of prostate cancer cells and what makes them so “deadly”. By understanding the biology behind these tumor cells, they hope to develop better therapies to treat the late-stage forms of this disease.

UCLA scientists Bryan Smith and Owen Witte. (Image credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center)

UCLA scientists Bryan Smith and Owen Witte. (Image credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center)

But don’t worry, help is already on its way. Two groups from the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, Santa Cruz published a breakthrough discovery yesterday on the similarity between prostate cancer cells and prostate stem cells. The study was published in the journal PNAS and was led by senior author and director of the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center, Dr. Owen Witte.

Using bioinformatics, Witte and his team compared the gene expression profiles of late-stage, metastatic prostate cancer cells sourced from tumor biopsies of living patients to healthy cell types in the male prostate. Epithelial cells are one of the main cell types in the prostate (they form the prostate glands) and they come in two forms: basal and luminal. When they compared the gene expression profiles of the prostate cancer cells to healthy prostate epithelial cells, they found that the cancer cells had a similar profile to normal prostate epithelial basal stem cells.

Image of a prostate cancer tumor. Green and red represent different stem cell traits and the yellow areas show where two stem cell traits are expressed together. (Image credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center)

Image of a prostate cancer tumor. Green and red represent different stem cell traits and the yellow areas show where two stem cell traits are expressed together. (Image credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center)

In fact, they discovered a 91-gene signature specific to the basal stem cells in the prostate. This profile included genes important for stem cell signaling and invasiveness. That meant that the metastatic prostate cancer cells also expressed “stem-like” genes.

First author Bryan Smith explained how their results support similar findings for other types of cancers. “Evidence from cancer research suggests that aggressive cancers have stem–cell-like traits. We now know this to be true for the most aggressive form of prostate cancer.”

So what does this study mean for prostate cancer patients? I’ll let Dr. Witte answer this one…

Treatments for early stage prostate cancer are often successful, but therapies that target the more aggressive and late-stage forms of the disease are urgently needed. I believe this research gives us important insight into the cellular nature of aggressive prostate cancer. Pinpointing the cellular traits of cancer — what makes those cells grow and spread — is crucial because then we can possibly target those traits to reverse or stop cancer’s progression. Our findings will inform our work as we strive to find treatments for aggressive prostate cancer.

Related links:


Calling for a cure for HIV/AIDS

Larry Kramer - Photo by David Shankbone

Larry Kramer – Photo by David Shankbone

Larry Kramer is a pivotal figure in the history of HIV/AIDS. His activism on many fronts has been widely credited with changing public health policy and speeding up access to experimental medications for people infected with the virus. So when he says that the fight for treatment is not enough but “The battle cry now must be one word — cure, cure, cure!” People pay attention.

A few years ago it might have been considered dangerously optimistic to use the word “cure” in any conversation about HIV/AIDS, but that’s no longer the case. In fact cure is something that is becoming not just a wildly ambitious dream, but something that scientists are working hard to achieve right now.

On Tuesday, October 6th, we are going to hold an HIV/AIDS Cure Town Hall meeting in Palm Springs. This will be the third event we’ve held and the previous two, in San Francisco and Los Angeles, were hugely successful. It’s not hard to understand why. Our experts are going to be talking about their work in trying to eradicate the AIDS virus from people infected with it.

This includes clinical trials run by Calimmune and City of Hope/Sangamo, plus some truly cutting edge research by Dr. Paula Cannon of the University of Southern California.

The clinical trials are both taking similar, if slightly different, approaches to reach the same goal; functionally curing people with HIV. They take the patient’s own blood stem cells and genetically modify them so that the AIDS virus is no longer able to infect them. They also help boost the patient’s T cells, a key part of a healthy immune system and the virus’ main target, so that they can fight back against the virus. It’s a kind of one-two punch to block and eventually evict the virus.

Timothy Brown; photo courtesy

Timothy Brown; photo courtesy

This work is based on the real-life experiences of Timothy Ray Brown, the “Berlin Patient”. He became the first person ever cured of HIV/AIDS when he got a bone marrow transplant from a person with a natural resistance to HIV. This created a new blood supply and a new immune system both of which were resistant to HIV.

Timothy is going to be joining us at the event in Palm Springs to share his story and show that cure is not just a word it’s a goal; one that we can now think of as being possible.

The HIV/AIDS Cure Town Hall event will be held on Tuesday, October 6th in the Sinatra Auditorium at the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs. Doors open at 6pm and the program starts at 6.30pm. And of course, it’s free.

CIRM Scholar Spotlight: Matt Donne on Lung Stem Cells

CIRM has funded a number of educational and research training programs over the past ten years to give younger students and graduate/postdoc scholars the opportunity to explore stem cell science.

Two of the main programs we support are the Bridges and the CIRM Scholars Training Program. These programs fund future scientists from an undergraduate to postdoctoral level with a goal of creating “training programs that will significantly enhance the technical skills, knowledge, and experience of a diverse cohort of… trainees in the development of stem cell based therapies.”

The Stem Cellar team was interested to hear from Bridges and CIRM scholars themselves about their experience with these programs, how their careers have benefited from CIRM funding, and what research accomplishments they have under their belt. We were able to track some of these scholars down, and will be publishing a series of interview-style blogs featuring them over the next few months.

Matt Donne

Matt Donne

We start off with a Matt Donne, a PhD student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology graduate program. Matt is a talented scientist and has a pretty cool story about his research training path. I sat down with Matt to ask him a few questions.

Q: Tell us how you got into a Stem Cell graduate program at UCSF.

MD: I was fortunate to have Dr. Carmen Domingo from San Francisco State support my application into the CIRM Bridges Program. I’d been working for Dr. Susan Fisher at UCSF for a couple of years and realized that I wanted to get a PhD and go to UCSF. I thought the best way to do that was improve my GPA and get a masters degree in stem cell biology. I applied to the CIRM program at SF State, and was accepted.

The Bridges Program has been a great feeder platform to get students more science experience exposure than they would have otherwise received, and prepares them well to move on to competitive graduate schools.

After receiving my Masters degree, I was admitted into the first year of the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology program at UCSF. When the opportunity to apply for a training grant from CIRM came about between my first and second year of at UCSF, I knew I had to give it a chance and apply. With the help of my mentor, Dr. Jason Rock, I wrote a solid proposal and was awarded the fellowship.

While at SF State, Carmen was extremely supportive and always available for her students. Since then, many of us still keep in touch and more have joined the UCSF graduate school community.

Q: Can you describe your graduate research?

MD: The field of regenerative medicine is searching for ways to allow us to repair injuries similar to how the Marvel Comic Wolverine can repair his wounds in the movies. One interesting fact which has been known for several decades, but has not been able to be investigated more deeply until now, is the innate ability for the adult lung to regrow lost lung tissue without any sort of intervention. My thesis focuses on defining the molecular mechanisms and stem cell niches that allow for this normal, healthy adult lung tissue growth. The working hypothesis is if we can understand what makes a cell undergo healthy tissue proliferation and differentiation, we could stimulate this response to cure individuals who suffer from diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Similarly, if we understand how a cell decides to respond in a diseased way, we could stop or revert the disease process from occurring.

One of the models we use in our lab is a “pneumosphere” culture. We essentially grow alveoli, which are the site of gas exchange in the lung, in a dish to attempt to understand how specific alveolar stem cells signal and interact with one another. This information will teach us how these cells behave so we can in turn either promote a healthy response to injury or, potentially, stop the progression of unhealthy cell responses. The technique of growing alveoli in a dish allows us to cut down on the “noise” and focus on major cellular pathways, which we can then more selectively apply to our mouse model systems.

Pneumospheres. (Photo by Matt Donne)

Pneumospheres or “lung cells in a dish”. (Photo by Matt Donne)

Lung cells.

Lung pneumospheres under a microscope. (Photo by Matt Donne)

We are now in the process of submitting a paper demonstrating some of the molecular players that are involved in this regenerative lung response. Hopefully the reviewers will think our paper is as awesome we as believe it to be.

Q: How has being a CIRM scholar benefited your graduate research career?

MD: Starting in my second year at UCSF, I was awarded the CIRM fellowship. I think it helped the lab to have the majority of my stipend covered through the CIRM fellowship, and personally I was very excited about the $5,000 discretionary budget. These monies allowed me to go to conferences every year for the past three years, and also have helped to support the costs of my experiments.

The first conference I attended was a Gordon Conference in Italy on Developmental Biology. There I was able to learn more about the field and also make friends with many professors, students, and postdocs from around the world. Last year, I went to my first lung-specific conference, and attended again this year. That has been one of the highlights of my PhD career. While there, one is able to speak and interact with professors whose names are seen in many textbooks and published papers. I never thought I would be able to so casually interact with them and develop relationships. Since then, I have been able to work on small collaborations with professors from across the US.

It was great that I could go to these conferences and establish important relationships with professors without being a major financial burden to my Professor. Plus, it has been hugely beneficial for my career as I now have professors whom I can reach out to as I look towards my future as a scientist.

Q: What other benefits did the CIRM scholars program provide you?

MD: Dr. Susan Fisher has been in charge of the CIRM program at UCSF. She organized lunch-time research talks that involved both academic as well as non-academic leaders in the field. I enjoyed the extra exposure to new fields of stem cell biology as well as the ability to learn more about the start-up and non-academic world. There are not many programs that offer this type of experience, and I felt fortunate to be a part of it. Also, the free lunches on occasion were a nice perk for a grad student living in San Francisco!

I attended the CIRM organized conferences whenever they happened. It’s always great presenting at or attending poster sessions at these events, seeing familiar faces and meeting new people. I took full advantage of the learning and networking that CIRM allowed me to do. The CIRM elevator pitch competition was really cool too. I didn’t win, came in third, but I enjoyed the challenge of trying to break down my thesis project into a digestible one-minute pitch.

Q: Where do you see the field of lung biology and regenerative medicine heading?

MD: My take away from the research conferences I have attended with the help of CIRM-funding is that we are in a very exciting time for lung stem cell research. The field overall is still young, but there are many labs across the world now working on a “lung mapping project” to better define stem cell populations in the lung. I see this research in the future translating in to regenerative therapies by which diseased cells/tissue will be targeted to actually stop the disease progression, and in turn possibly repair and regenerate healthy new tissue. This research has wide reaching implications as it has the potential to help everyone from a premature baby more quickly develop mature healthy lungs, to adults suffering from COPD brought on by environmental factors, such as air pollution. As many scientists are often quoted, “This is a very exciting time for our field.”

Q: What are your future plans?

MD: I expect to graduate in about a year’s time. In the future, I want to pursue a career focusing on the social impact of science. I aspire to be someone like UCSF’s former chancellor Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmand. It’s really cool to go from someone who was the president of product development at Genentech, to chancellor at UCSF, to now president of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Bringing science to impact society in that way is what I hope to do with my future.

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