Why TED Talks are ChildX’s Play

When the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talks began in 1984 they were intended to be a one-off event. So much for that idea! Today they are a global event, with TED-sponsored conferences held everywhere from Scotland to Tanzania and India. They have also spawned a mini-industry of copycat events. Well, their slogan is “Ideas Worth Spreading” so in a way they only have themselves to blame for having such a great idea.

Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo

Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo

The latest place for that idea to take root is Stanford, which is holding a TED-style event focused on critical issues facing child and maternal health. The event – April 2nd and 3rd at Stanford – is called ChildX where x = medicine + technology + innovative treatment + wellbeing. ChildX will bring together some of the leading experts in the field for a series of thoughtful, powerful presentations on the biggest problems facing child and maternal health, and the most exciting research aimed at resolving those problems. One of the main tracks during the two-day event is a section on stem cell and gene therapy. It will raise a number of key questions including:

  • What advances have occurred to enable these therapies to move from science fiction less than a decade ago to the promise of next generation transformative therapeutics?
  • In coming years, how will these therapies allow children with presently incurable diseases to become children living free of disease and reaching their maximum potential?

The moderator for that discussion is Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo, and you can hear her talking about the most recent advances in the clinical use of stem cell and gene therapies on this podcast. Anytime you get a chance to hear some of the most compelling speakers in their field talk about exciting innovations that could shape the future, it’s worth taking the time to listen.

Goodnight, Stem Cells: How Well Rested Cells Keep Us Healthy

Plenty of studies show that a lack of sleep is nothing but bad news and can contribute to a whole host of health problems like heart disease, poor memory, high blood pressure and obesity.

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Even stem cells need rest to stay healthy

In a sense, the same holds true for the stem cells in our body. In response to injury, adult stem cells go to work by dividing and specializing into the cells needed to heal specific tissues and organs. But they also need to rest for long-lasting health. Each cell division carries a risk of introducing DNA mutations—and with it, a risk for cancer. Too much cell division can also deplete the stem cell supply, crippling the healing process. So it’s just as important for the stem cells to assume an inactive, or quiescent, state to maintain their ability to mend the body. Blood stem cells for instance are mostly quiescent and only divide about every two months to renew their reserves.

Even though the importance of this balance is well documented, exactly how it’s achieved is not well understood; that is, until now. Earlier this week, a CIRM-funded research team from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reported on the identification of an enzyme that’s key in controlling the work-rest balance in blood stem cells, also called hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Their study, published in the journal Blood, could point the way to drugs that treat anemias, blood cancers, and other blood disorders.

Previous studies in other cell types suggested that this key enzyme, called ItpkB, might play a role in promoting a rested state in HSCs. Senior author Karsten Sauer explained their reasoning for focusing on the enzyme in a press release:

“What made ItpkB an attractive protein to study is that it can dampen activating signaling in other cells. We hypothesized that ItpkB might do the same in HSCs to keep them at rest. Moreover, ItpkB is an enzyme whose function can be controlled by small molecules. This might facilitate drug development if our hypothesis were true.”

Senior author Karsten Sauer is an associate professor at The Scripps Research Institute.

Senior author Karsten Sauer is an associate professor at The Scripps Research Institute.

To test their hypothesis, the team studied HSCs in mice that completely lacked ItpkB. Sure enough, without ItpkB the HSCs got stuck in the “on” position and continually multiplied until the supply of HSCs stores in the bone marrow were exhausted. Without these stem cells, the mice could no longer produce red blood cells, which deliver oxygen to the body or white blood cells, which fight off infection. As a result the animals died due to severe anemia and bone marrow failure. Sauer used a great analogy to describe the result:

“It’s like a car—you need to hit the gas pedal to get some activity, but if you hit it too hard, you can crash into a wall. ItpkB is that spring that prevents you from pushing the pedal all the way through.”

With this new understanding of how balancing stem cell activation and deactivation works, Sauer and his team have their sights set on human therapies:

“If we can show that ItpkB also keeps human HSCs healthy, this could open avenues to target ItpkB to improve HSC function in bone marrow failure syndromes and immunodeficiencies or to increase the success rates of HSC transplantation therapies for leukemias and lymphomas.”

Avoiding drug trial tragedies: new stem cell-based test predicts dangerous drug toxicity

In 2006 Ryan Wilson, a healthy 20 year old Londoner, volunteered for a first-in-human clinical trial to help test the safety of a new drug, TGN1412, intended to treat rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia. The cash he’d get in exchange for his time would help fund his upcoming vacation.

Instead, he nearly died.

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The TGN1412 drug trial disaster got a lot of high profile news coverage in 2006. (image credit: BBC News)

Even though the drug amount injected in his body was 500 times lower than the dose found to be safe in animals, Wilson experienced a catastrophic immune reaction, called a cytokine storm, that led to heart, kidney and liver failure, pneumonia and the loss of his toes and three fingers to dry gangrene. The other five healthy volunteers were also severely injured.

TGN1412’s devastating effect was unfortunately missed in preclinical laboratory and animal studies prior to the human trial. Unlike the pills in your medicine cabinet which are made up of synthesized chemicals, TGN1424 belongs to a growing class of medicines called biologics which come from biological sources such as proteins, DNA, sugars and cells. There is a concern that once a biologic is injected in a patient, the immune system may mount a strong attack all over the body. If that happens, too many immune cells, or white blood cells, are activated and release proteins, called cytokines, which in turn activate more immune cells and the reaction spirals into a dangerous cytokine storm like in Ryan Wilson’s case.

Clearly this tragedy begs for tests that can better predict drug toxicity in humans well before the first trial participants step into the clinic. On Monday a research team from the Imperial College London reported in the journal FASEB that they have done just that using human blood stem cells.

The team’s novel test is not so different than previous ones. Both tests are carried out in a petri dish using two human cell types: white blood cells and endothelial cells, a component of blood vessels. Both tests are also designed to mimic the human immune system’s response to biologics by measuring the release of cytokines.

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Endothelial cells grown from blood stem cells. (credit: Imperial College London)

But the Imperial College London team’s test differs from others in one important way: both the white blood cell and endothelial cell types come from the same individual. First they collect a donor’s blood stem cells and specialize them into endothelial cells. Then white blood cells are also collected from the same donor.

The prior tests, on the other hand, rely on cells from two different donors. Because the two cell types aren’t necessarily tissue-matched, the white blood cells may already be primed for an immune response even before a biologic is added to the test. In fact, these prior tests weren’t able to distinguish between a biologic known to cause a limited immune response versus TGN1424, known to cause a cytokine storm. The newly developed test, however, accurately predicts both the toxic cytokine storm caused by TGN1424 and the absence of a response by several approved biologics, such as the breast cancer drug Herceptin.

In a college news release, Jane Mitchell, the senior author on the report, sees the big picture importance of her lab’s work:

“As biological therapies become more mainstream, it’s more likely that drugs being tested on humans for the first time will have unexpected and potentially catastrophic effects. We’ve used adult stem cell technology to develop a laboratory test that could prevent another disaster like the TGN1412 trial.”

Their results also highlight the often-overlooked power of stem cells to not just deliver therapies but to help develop safer ones.

Pioneer’s 25-year struggle to treat blindness

Being a pioneer is never easy. You are charting unknown territory, tackling problems that have defeated others before you. You have to overcome so many obstacles that at times the challenge can seem insurmountable. But for those who succeed in reaching their goal, the rewards can be extraordinary.

Graziella Pellegrini, Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena, Italy

Graziella Pellegrini, Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena, Italy

Last month Italian researcher Graziella Pellegrini saw 25 years of work pay off when a treatment she developed to cure a form of blindness was given approval for sale by the European Commission.

This is quite an achievement as this means her treatment, called Holoclar, is among the first commercial stem therapies in the world (the first was Prochymal, which has been approved in Canada and New Zealand for the treatment of pediatric GVHD. This drug was developed by Osiris, which was led by our current President & CEO, Dr. Randy Mills.)

Holoclar uses stem cells to help stimulate the regrowth of a cornea. It can only be used for certain rare conditions, but that in no way diminishes its importance for patients or significance for the regenerative medicine field as a whole.

Nature recently sat down with Dr. Pellegrini to talk about her work, her struggle, and the many obstacles she had to overcome to get market approval for her work.

The interview makes for fascinating reading, and is a timely reminder why this kind of groundbreaking research never goes quite as quickly, or smoothly, as one would hope.

CIRM currently has a number of projects focused treating different causes of blindness on limbal cells (the kind Dr. Pellegrini worked on) and other forms of blindness; including a project to treat macular degeneration that has been approved for a clinical trial, and a therapy for retinitis pigmentosa that we hope will be approved for a clinical trial later this year.

One-Time, Lasting Treatment for Sickle Cell Disease May be on Horizon, According to New CIRM-Funded Study

For the nearly 1,000 babies born each year in the United States with sickle cell disease, a painful and arduous road awaits them. The only cure is to find a bone marrow donor—an exceedingly rare proposition. Instead, the standard treatment for this inherited blood disorder is regular blood transfusions, with repeated hospitalizations to deal with complications of the disease. And even then, life expectancy is less than 40 years old.

In Sickle Cell Disease, the misshapen red blood cells cause painful blood clots and a host of other complications.

In Sickle Cell Disease, the misshapen red blood cells cause painful blood clots and a host of other complications.

But now, scientists at UCLA are offering up a potentially superior alternative: a new method of gene therapy that can correct the genetic mutation that causes sickle cell disease—and thus help the body on its way to generate normal, healthy blood cells for the rest of the patient’s life. The study, funded in part by CIRM and reported in the journal Blood, offers a great alternative to developing a functional cure for sickle cell disease. The UCLA team is about to begin a clinical trial with another gene therapy method, so they—and their patients—will now have two shots on goal in their effort to cure the disease.

Though sickle cell disease causes dangerous changes to a patient’s entire blood supply, it is caused by one single genetic mutation in the beta-globin gene—altering the shape of the red blood cells from round and soft to pointed and hard, thus resembling a ‘sickle’ shape for which the disease is named. But the UCLA team, led by Donald Kohn, has now developed two methods that can correct the harmful mutation. As he explained in a UCLA news release about the newest technique:

“[These results] suggest the future direction for treating genetic diseases will be by correcting the specific mutation in a patient’s genetic code. Since sickle cell disease was the first human genetic disease where we understood the fundamental gene defect, and since everyone with sickle cell has the exact same mutation in the beta-globin gene, it is a great target for this gene correction method.”

The latest gene correction technique used by the team uses special enzymes, called zinc-finger nucleases, to literally cut out and remove the harmful mutation, replacing it with a corrected version. Here, Kohn and his team collected bone marrow stem cells from individuals with sickle cell disease. These bone marrow stem cells would normally give rise to sickle-shaped red blood cells. But in this study, the team zapped them with the zinc-finger nucleases in order to correct the mutation.

Then, the researchers implanted these corrected cells into laboratory mice. Much to their amazement, the implanted cells began to replicate—into normal, healthy red blood cells.

Kohn and his team worked with Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. to design the zinc-finger nucleases that specifically targeted and cut the sickle-cell mutation. The next steps will involve improving the efficiency and safest of this method in pre-clinical animal models, before moving into clinical trials.

“This is a promising first step in showing that gene correction has the potential to help patients with sickle cell disease,” said UCLA graduate student Megan Hoban, the study’s first author. “The study data provide the foundational evidence that the method is viable.”

This isn’t the first disease for which Kohn’s team has made significant strides in gene therapy to cure blood disorders. Just last year, the team announced a promising clinical trial to cure Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Syndrome, also known as SCID or “Bubble Baby Disease,” by correcting the genetic mutation that causes it.

While this current study still requires more research before moving into clinical trials, Kohn and his team announced last month that their other gene therapy method, also funded by CIRM, has been approved to start clinical trials. Kohn argues that it’s vital to explore all promising treatment options for this devastating condition:

“Finding varied ways to conduct stem cell gene therapies is important because not every treatment will work for every patient. Both methods could end up being viable approaches to providing one-time, lasting treatments for sickle cell disease and could also be applied to the treatment of a large number of other genetic diseases.”

Find Out More:
Read first-hand about Sickle Cell Disease in our Stories of Hope series.
Watch Donald Kohn speak to CIRM’s governing Board about his research.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; progress toward artificial brain, teeth may help the blind and obesity

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

More progress toward artificial brain. A team at the RIKEN Institute in Japan has used stem cells in a 3-D culture to create brain tissue more complex than prior efforts and from an area of the brain not produced before, the cerebellum—that lobe at the lower back of the brain that controls motor function and attention. As far back as 2008, a RIKEN team had created simple tissue that mimicked the cortex, the large surface area that controls memory and language.

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The Inquisitr web portal wrote a feature on a wide variety of efforts to create an artificial brain teeing off of this week’s publication of the cerebellum work in Cell Reports. The piece is fairly comprehensive covering computerized efforts to give robots intelligence and Europe’s Human Brain Project that is trying to map all the activity of the brain as a starting point for recapitulating it in the lab.

The experts interviewed included Robert Caplan of Tufts University in Massachusetts who is using 3-D scaffolding to build functional brain tissues that can process electrical signals. He is not planning any Frankenstein moments; he hopes to create models to improve understanding of brain diseases.

“Ideally we would like to have a laboratory brain system that recapitulates the most devastating diseases. We want to be able to take our existing toolkit of drugs and understand how they work instead of using trial and error.”

Teeth eyed as source of help for the blind. Today the European Union announced the first approval of a stem cell therapy for blindness. And already yesterday a team at the University of Pittsburg announced they had developed a new method to use stem cells to restore vision that could expand the number of patients who could benefit from stem cell therapy.

Many people have lost part or all their vision due to damage to the cornea on the surface of their eye. Even when they can gain vision back through a corneal transplant, their immune system often rejects the new tissue. So the ideal would be making new corneal tissue from the patient’s own cells. The Italian company that garnered the EU approval does this in patients by harvesting some of their own cornea-specific stem cells, called limbal stem cells. But this is only an option if only one eye is impacted by the damage.

The Pittsburgh team thinks it may have found an unlikely alternative source of limbal cells: the dental pulp taken from teeth that have be extracted. It is not as far fetched at it sounds on the surface. Teeth and the cornea both develop in the same section of the embryo, the cranial neural crest. So, they have a common lineage.

The researchers first treated the pulp cells with a solution that makes them turn into the type of cells found in the cornea. Then they created a fiber scaffold shaped like a cornea and seeded the cells on it. Many steps remain before people give up a tooth to regain their sight, but this first milestone points the way and was described in a press release from the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, which was picked up by the web site ClinicaSpace.

CIRM funds a project that also proposes to use the patient’s own limbal stem cells but using methods more likely to gain approval of the Food and Drug Administration than those used by the Italian company.

Stem cells and the fight against obesity. Of the two types of stem cells found in your bone marrow, one can form bone and cartilage and, all too often, fat. Preventing these stem cells from maturing into fat may be a tool in the fight against obesity according to a team at Queen Mary University of London.

The conversion of stem cells to fat seems to involve the cilia, or hair-like projections found on cells. When the cilia lengthen the stem cells progress toward becoming fat. But if the researchers genetically prevented that lengthening, they stopped the conversion to fat cells. The findings opens several different ways to think about understanding and curbing obesity says Melis Dalbay one of the authors of the study in a university press release picked up by ScienceNewsline.

“This is the first time that it has been shown that subtle changes in primary cilia structure can influence the differentiation of stem cells into fat. Since primary cilia length can be influenced by various factors including pharmaceuticals, inflammation and even mechanical forces, this study provides new insight into the regulation of fat cell formation and obesity.”

Clearing up chemobrain: cancer therapy-induced memory problems reversed by stem cells

You’d think receiving a cancer diagnosis and then suffering through chemo and/or radiation therapy would be traumatic enough. But as many as 75% of cancer survivors are afflicted by memory and attention problems long after their cancer therapy.

This condition, often called “chemobrain”, shouldn’t be misunderstood as being confined to cancers of the brain. A 2012 analysis of nearly 200 women who had been treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer showed they had ongoing memory and information processing deficits that persisted more than twenty years after their last round of treatment. And young cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable to reduced IQs, nonsocial behavior and an extremely lowered quality of life.

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CIRM grantee and UC Irvine professor Charles Limoli, PhD is senior author of this study

Chemotherapy drugs work by killing off cells that are dividing rapidly, a hallmark of cancer cells. But this brute force method also kills other rapidly dividing cells that are critical for normal bodily functions. In the case of chemobrain, it’s thought that damage to newly formed brain cells in the hippocampus, the memory center of the brain, is the culprit. A UC Irvine study published this week in Cancer Research supports that idea in experiments that test the effect of transplanting human nerve stem cells in rats. The research team leader Charles Limoli, a CIRM grantee and UC Irvine professor of radiation oncology, summarized the groundbreaking results in a press release (note: this study is not funded by CIRM):

“Our findings provide the first solid evidence that transplantation of human neural stem cells can be used to reverse chemotherapeutic-induced damage of healthy tissue in the brain.”

The novel place recognition test is evaluate memory function. Animal is initially presented with identical objects (red circles). Then a new object is introduced (blue square). A healthy mouse will investigate the blue square.

The novel place recognition test, one of several tests used in this study to evaluate memory function.  During training setup (left), the rodent is familiarized with identical objects (red circles). Later, rodent returns now in presence of a new object (blue square). A healthy mouse will investigate the new object during testing setup (right). Image credit: KnowingNeurons.com

So how the heck do you observe chemotherapy-induced cognitive problems in a rodent let alone show that stem cells can rescue the damage? In the study, the rats undergo a variety of recognition memory tasks after a typical chemotherapy drug treatment. For instance, in the novel place recognition test, an animal is familiarized with two identical objects inside a test “arena”. Later, the animal is returned to the arena but a new object is swapped in for one of the previous objects. Rats given chemotherapy treatment but no stem cell surgery (they’re implanted with a saline solution instead) do not show a preference for the novel object. But rats given chemotherapy and the human nerve stem cell surgery prefer the novel object. This novel seeking behavior is also seen in control rats given no chemotherapy. So these results demonstrate that the transplanted stem cells rescued normal memory recognition in the chemotherapy-treated rats.

The research team also saw differences within the brains of these groups of rats that match up with these behavioral results. First, they confirmed that the transplanted human stem cells had indeed survived and grafted into the rat brains and had matured into the correct type of brain cells. Next they looked at chemotherapy-induced inflammation of brain tissue. The brains of chemotherapy-treated rats with no stem cell transplantation showed increased number of active immune cells compared to the control and stem cell transplanted animals. In another experiment, a detailed analysis of the structure of individual nerve cells showed extensive damage in the chemotherapy treated rats compared to controls. Again, this damage was reversed in chemotherapy treated rats that also received the stem cell transplant.

Rat nerve cells (black structures) in memory center of the brain are damaged by chemotherapy (left); transplanting human nerve stem cells reverses the damage (right)

Rat nerve cells (black structures) in memory center of the brain are damaged by chemotherapy (left); transplanting human nerve stem cells reverses the damage (right). Image credit: Acharya et al. Cancer Research 75(4) p. 676

As many researchers can tell you, these exciting results in animals don’t guarantee a human therapy is around the corner. But still, says Limoli:

“This research suggests that stem cell therapies may one day be implemented in the clinic to provide relief to patients suffering from cognitive impairments incurred as a result of their cancer treatments. While much work remains, a clinical trial analyzing the safety of such approaches may be possible within a few years.”

For a more details about the role of stem cells in chemobrain, watch this recent presentation to the CIRM Governing Board by CIRM grantee and Stanford professor Michelle Monje.

Money matters: how investing in research advances stem cell science

Our goal at the stem cell agency is simple; to accelerate the development of successful therapies to patients with unmet medical needs. But on the way to doing that something interesting is happening; we’re helping advance the scientific understanding of stem cells and building a robust stem cell research community in California in the process.

You don’t have to take our word for it. A new paper in the journal Cell Stem Cell takes a look at the impact that state funding for stem cell research has had on scientific publications. The question the researchers posed was; have the states that fund stem cell research seen an increase in their share of scientific publications in the field? The answer, at least in California’s case, is absolutely yes.

Let’s back up a little. In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s the field of stem cell research was considered quite controversial, particularly when it came to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). To help scientists get around some of the restrictions that were placed on the use of federal funds to do hESC research a number of states voted to provide their own funding for this work. This research focuses on four of the biggest supporters of this work: California, Connecticut, Maryland, and New York.

The researchers looked at the following factors:

  1. The percentage of scientific publications in the U.S.
  2. With at least one author from those four states.
  3. That focused on hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).
  4. Comparing the numbers from before the state funding kicked in to after.

Finally – stay with me here, we’re almost done – they compared those numbers to the number of publications for two other areas of non-controversial biomedical research, RNAi and cancer. For California the results were clear. The percentage of papers on RNAi and cancer from 1996 – 2013, that had at least one California author, stayed fairly consistent (between 15-18%). However, the percentage of papers on hESCs and iPSCS with a California author rose from zero in 1998 and 2006 (the year each was discovered) to a high of 45 percent in 2009. That has since dropped down a little but still remains consistently high.

Study graphic study code The article says the reason for this is really rather obvious: “that state funding programs appear to have contributed to over-performance in the field.”

“After the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) issued its first grants in April 2006, the share of articles acknowledging California funding increased rapidly. Between 2010 and 2013, approximately 55% of hESC-related articles published with at least one California author acknowledged state funding, suggesting that this funding program played an important role as California maintained and built upon its early leadership in the field.”

Connecticut also saw its share of publications rise, though not as dramatically as California. Maryland and New York, in contrast, saw their share of publications remain consistent. However, as the researchers point out, with California gobbling up so much more of the available space in these journals, the fact that both states kept their share consistent was an achievement in itself.

The researchers acknowledge that scientific publications are “only one measure of the impact of state science programs” and say it’s important we look at other measures as well – such as how many clinical trials arise from that research. Nonetheless they conclude by saying:

“This analysis illustrating the relative performance of states in the production of stem-cell-related research publications provides a useful starting point for policymakers and, potentially, voters considering the future of state stem cell funding efforts as well as others interested in state science and technology policy more generally.”

Our Tainted Food Supply: Its Lasting Effects on Stem Cells May Explain Declines in Sperm Counts

Spermatozoons, floating to ovuleIn the science fiction film, Children of Men, humans in the year 2027 face extinction due to decades of infertility. This premise doesn’t seem all that far-fetched when you consider studies in the U.S., Japan, and Europe over the past two decades that point to declining sperm counts. A 2013 study, for instance, that followed 26,000 French men for 17 years reported a 32% drop in sperm counts. And a study of 5000 Danish men with a median age of 19 found 40% had sperm counts corresponding to infertility or decreased fertility.

So what’s going on here? One line of evidence blames exposure to chemicals that leach into our food and water supply. A possible culprit is the much-despised Bisphenol-A, or BPA, a man-made chemical found in plastic bottles, the inner linings of canned food and even receipt paper used at your local grocery store. BPA is known as a hormone disruptor because it interferes with normal hormone activity in the body by mimicking the female hormone estrogen. Lab animals exposed to low levels of BPA have shown increased incidence of certain cancers, neurological problems, diabetes, obesity, female reproduction problems and, yes, decreased sperm counts.

BPA_shutterstock_243369064Data published last week in PLOS Genetics appears to have pinpointed the link between BPA and decreased sperm counts: stem cells. Specifically the so-called spermatogonial stem cells that give rise to sperm. In the Washington State University study, the research team gave newborn male mice daily oral doses of BPA for about two weeks. The chemical exposure negatively affected this spermatogonial stem cell population by disrupting the processing of the cells’ DNA and, in turn, the development of fully mature sperm. The team got similar results replacing BPA with synthetic estrogen found in birth control pills. This form of estrogen is also known to contaminate our water supply even after sewage treatment.

A surprising and even scary twist to these results is that the brief exposure of BPA or estrogen in the newborn male mice permanently changed their stem cells. The team confirmed this observation by transplanting the spermatogonial stem cells from BPA-exposed mice into the testes of mice that never received BPA. In this case, these mice still exhibited reduced sperm production. As senior author Nancy Hunt points out in an interview with Scientific American, the exposure to these chemicals:

“is not simply affecting sperm being produced now, but impacting the stem cell population, and that will affect sperm produced throughout the lifetime.”

It’s remains debatable whether the detectable BPA or estrogen levels in our food and water supply is high enough to actually cause health problems in humans. In 2013 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) downplayed possible worries on its website:

“Is BPA safe? Yes. Based on FDA’s ongoing safety review of scientific evidence, the available information continues to support the safety of BPA for the currently approved uses in food containers and packaging.”

Still, this recent study and others like it certainly warrant further investigation. University of Missouri scientist Frederick vom Saal, who was not part of the study, put it this way in his interview with Scientific American:

“It’s important in future studies to see if the stem cell changes from exposure are passed to future generations… Since most people are consistently exposed to BPA and other estrogenic compounds, each generation could have it a bit worse.”

 

 

 

Scientists Send Rodents to Space; Test New Therapy to Prevent Bone Loss

In just a few months, 40 very special rodents will embark upon the journey of a lifetime.

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Today UCLA scientists are announcing the start of a project that will test a new therapy that has the potential to slow, halt or even reverse bone loss due to disease or injury.

With grant funding from the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), a team of stem cell scientists led by UCLA professor of orthopedic surgery Chia Soo will send 40 rodents to the International Space Station (ISS). Living under microgravity conditions for two months, these rodents will begin to undergo bone loss—thus closely mimicking the conditions of bone loss, known as osteoporosis, seen in humans back on Earth.

At that point, the rodents will be injected with a molecule called NELL-1. Discovered by Soo’s UCLA colleague Kang Ting, this molecule has been shown in early tests to spur bone growth. In this new set of experiments on the ISS, the researchers hope to test the ability of NELL-1 to spur bone growth in the rodents.

The team is optimistic that NELL-1 could really be key to transforming how doctors treat bone loss. Said Ting in a news release:

“NELL-1 holds tremendous hope, not only for preventing bone loss but one day even restoring healthy bone. For patients who are bed-bound and suffering from bone loss, it could be life-changing.”

“Besides testing the limits of NELL-1’s robust bone-producing efforts, this mission will provide new insights about bone biology and could uncover important clues for curing diseases such as osteoporosis,” added Ben Wu, a UCLA bioengineer responsible for initially modifying NELL-1 to make it useful for treating bone loss.

The UCLA team will oversee ground operations while the experiments will be performed by NASA scientists on the ISS and coordinated by CASIS.

These experiments are important not only for developing new therapies to treat gradual bone loss, such as osteoporosis, which normally affects the elderly, but also those who have bone loss due to trauma or injury—including bone loss due to extended microgravity conditions, a persistent problem for astronauts living on the ISS. Said Soo:

“This research has enormous translational application for astronauts in space flight and for patients on Earth who have osteoporosis or other bone-loss problems from disease, illness or trauma.”