Calling for a cure for HIV/AIDS

Larry Kramer - Photo by David Shankbone

Larry Kramer – Photo by David Shankbone

Larry Kramer is a pivotal figure in the history of HIV/AIDS. His activism on many fronts has been widely credited with changing public health policy and speeding up access to experimental medications for people infected with the virus. So when he says that the fight for treatment is not enough but “The battle cry now must be one word — cure, cure, cure!” People pay attention.

A few years ago it might have been considered dangerously optimistic to use the word “cure” in any conversation about HIV/AIDS, but that’s no longer the case. In fact cure is something that is becoming not just a wildly ambitious dream, but something that scientists are working hard to achieve right now.

On Tuesday, October 6th, we are going to hold an HIV/AIDS Cure Town Hall meeting in Palm Springs. This will be the third event we’ve held and the previous two, in San Francisco and Los Angeles, were hugely successful. It’s not hard to understand why. Our experts are going to be talking about their work in trying to eradicate the AIDS virus from people infected with it.

This includes clinical trials run by Calimmune and City of Hope/Sangamo, plus some truly cutting edge research by Dr. Paula Cannon of the University of Southern California.

The clinical trials are both taking similar, if slightly different, approaches to reach the same goal; functionally curing people with HIV. They take the patient’s own blood stem cells and genetically modify them so that the AIDS virus is no longer able to infect them. They also help boost the patient’s T cells, a key part of a healthy immune system and the virus’ main target, so that they can fight back against the virus. It’s a kind of one-two punch to block and eventually evict the virus.

Timothy Brown; photo courtesy

Timothy Brown; photo courtesy

This work is based on the real-life experiences of Timothy Ray Brown, the “Berlin Patient”. He became the first person ever cured of HIV/AIDS when he got a bone marrow transplant from a person with a natural resistance to HIV. This created a new blood supply and a new immune system both of which were resistant to HIV.

Timothy is going to be joining us at the event in Palm Springs to share his story and show that cure is not just a word it’s a goal; one that we can now think of as being possible.

The HIV/AIDS Cure Town Hall event will be held on Tuesday, October 6th in the Sinatra Auditorium at the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs. Doors open at 6pm and the program starts at 6.30pm. And of course, it’s free.

CIRM Scholar Spotlight: Matt Donne on Lung Stem Cells

CIRM has funded a number of educational and research training programs over the past ten years to give younger students and graduate/postdoc scholars the opportunity to explore stem cell science.

Two of the main programs we support are the Bridges and the CIRM Scholars Training Program. These programs fund future scientists from an undergraduate to postdoctoral level with a goal of creating “training programs that will significantly enhance the technical skills, knowledge, and experience of a diverse cohort of… trainees in the development of stem cell based therapies.”

The Stem Cellar team was interested to hear from Bridges and CIRM scholars themselves about their experience with these programs, how their careers have benefited from CIRM funding, and what research accomplishments they have under their belt. We were able to track some of these scholars down, and will be publishing a series of interview-style blogs featuring them over the next few months.

Matt Donne

Matt Donne

We start off with a Matt Donne, a PhD student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology graduate program. Matt is a talented scientist and has a pretty cool story about his research training path. I sat down with Matt to ask him a few questions.

Q: Tell us how you got into a Stem Cell graduate program at UCSF.

MD: I was fortunate to have Dr. Carmen Domingo from San Francisco State support my application into the CIRM Bridges Program. I’d been working for Dr. Susan Fisher at UCSF for a couple of years and realized that I wanted to get a PhD and go to UCSF. I thought the best way to do that was improve my GPA and get a masters degree in stem cell biology. I applied to the CIRM program at SF State, and was accepted.

The Bridges Program has been a great feeder platform to get students more science experience exposure than they would have otherwise received, and prepares them well to move on to competitive graduate schools.

After receiving my Masters degree, I was admitted into the first year of the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology program at UCSF. When the opportunity to apply for a training grant from CIRM came about between my first and second year of at UCSF, I knew I had to give it a chance and apply. With the help of my mentor, Dr. Jason Rock, I wrote a solid proposal and was awarded the fellowship.

While at SF State, Carmen was extremely supportive and always available for her students. Since then, many of us still keep in touch and more have joined the UCSF graduate school community.

Q: Can you describe your graduate research?

MD: The field of regenerative medicine is searching for ways to allow us to repair injuries similar to how the Marvel Comic Wolverine can repair his wounds in the movies. One interesting fact which has been known for several decades, but has not been able to be investigated more deeply until now, is the innate ability for the adult lung to regrow lost lung tissue without any sort of intervention. My thesis focuses on defining the molecular mechanisms and stem cell niches that allow for this normal, healthy adult lung tissue growth. The working hypothesis is if we can understand what makes a cell undergo healthy tissue proliferation and differentiation, we could stimulate this response to cure individuals who suffer from diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Similarly, if we understand how a cell decides to respond in a diseased way, we could stop or revert the disease process from occurring.

One of the models we use in our lab is a “pneumosphere” culture. We essentially grow alveoli, which are the site of gas exchange in the lung, in a dish to attempt to understand how specific alveolar stem cells signal and interact with one another. This information will teach us how these cells behave so we can in turn either promote a healthy response to injury or, potentially, stop the progression of unhealthy cell responses. The technique of growing alveoli in a dish allows us to cut down on the “noise” and focus on major cellular pathways, which we can then more selectively apply to our mouse model systems.

Pneumospheres. (Photo by Matt Donne)

Pneumospheres or “lung cells in a dish”. (Photo by Matt Donne)

Lung cells.

Lung pneumospheres under a microscope. (Photo by Matt Donne)

We are now in the process of submitting a paper demonstrating some of the molecular players that are involved in this regenerative lung response. Hopefully the reviewers will think our paper is as awesome we as believe it to be.

Q: How has being a CIRM scholar benefited your graduate research career?

MD: Starting in my second year at UCSF, I was awarded the CIRM fellowship. I think it helped the lab to have the majority of my stipend covered through the CIRM fellowship, and personally I was very excited about the $5,000 discretionary budget. These monies allowed me to go to conferences every year for the past three years, and also have helped to support the costs of my experiments.

The first conference I attended was a Gordon Conference in Italy on Developmental Biology. There I was able to learn more about the field and also make friends with many professors, students, and postdocs from around the world. Last year, I went to my first lung-specific conference, and attended again this year. That has been one of the highlights of my PhD career. While there, one is able to speak and interact with professors whose names are seen in many textbooks and published papers. I never thought I would be able to so casually interact with them and develop relationships. Since then, I have been able to work on small collaborations with professors from across the US.

It was great that I could go to these conferences and establish important relationships with professors without being a major financial burden to my Professor. Plus, it has been hugely beneficial for my career as I now have professors whom I can reach out to as I look towards my future as a scientist.

Q: What other benefits did the CIRM scholars program provide you?

MD: Dr. Susan Fisher has been in charge of the CIRM program at UCSF. She organized lunch-time research talks that involved both academic as well as non-academic leaders in the field. I enjoyed the extra exposure to new fields of stem cell biology as well as the ability to learn more about the start-up and non-academic world. There are not many programs that offer this type of experience, and I felt fortunate to be a part of it. Also, the free lunches on occasion were a nice perk for a grad student living in San Francisco!

I attended the CIRM organized conferences whenever they happened. It’s always great presenting at or attending poster sessions at these events, seeing familiar faces and meeting new people. I took full advantage of the learning and networking that CIRM allowed me to do. The CIRM elevator pitch competition was really cool too. I didn’t win, came in third, but I enjoyed the challenge of trying to break down my thesis project into a digestible one-minute pitch.

Q: Where do you see the field of lung biology and regenerative medicine heading?

MD: My take away from the research conferences I have attended with the help of CIRM-funding is that we are in a very exciting time for lung stem cell research. The field overall is still young, but there are many labs across the world now working on a “lung mapping project” to better define stem cell populations in the lung. I see this research in the future translating in to regenerative therapies by which diseased cells/tissue will be targeted to actually stop the disease progression, and in turn possibly repair and regenerate healthy new tissue. This research has wide reaching implications as it has the potential to help everyone from a premature baby more quickly develop mature healthy lungs, to adults suffering from COPD brought on by environmental factors, such as air pollution. As many scientists are often quoted, “This is a very exciting time for our field.”

Q: What are your future plans?

MD: I expect to graduate in about a year’s time. In the future, I want to pursue a career focusing on the social impact of science. I aspire to be someone like UCSF’s former chancellor Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmand. It’s really cool to go from someone who was the president of product development at Genentech, to chancellor at UCSF, to now president of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Bringing science to impact society in that way is what I hope to do with my future.

Related links:

How Brain Stem Cells Could Stay Forever Young

As we age, so do the cells that make up our bodies. To keep us spry as we get older, our bodies rely on adult stem cells to replace the cells in our tissues and organs. Adult stem cells can only generate cell types specific to the organ or tissue that they live in. For instance, heart stem cells can only help regenerate or repair the heart, same for brain stem cells and the brain, etc.

While adult stem cells have built-in mechanisms to help them avoid the aging process for as long as possible, they can only delay the inevitable for so long. So as the function of our bodies decline, so does adult stem cell function and with it our ability to regenerate damaged tissue.

But now a new study has found out what happens to cause the aging of adult stem cells and points at ways to avoid it and keep these stem cells “forever young.”

Brain stem cells stay youthful

A group from Zurich, Switzerland studied how brain stem cells stay young as the brain ages. In a study published in Science on Friday, they found that young brain stem cells divide in a way that routes damaged proteins and aging-related factors away from the daughter stem cells and into their non-stem cell progeny, thus keeping brain stem cells healthy and youthful.


Brain stem cells divide asymmetrically into a daughter stem cell and a non-stem daughter cell that can differentiate into other brain cells (Image adapted from Berika et al., 2014).

The Zurich group took a closer look at brain stem cells in adult mouse brains and found that they divide asymmetrically. This means that instead of equally dividing its cellular components between two daughter cells, the mother cell instead herds all of the damaged proteins and aging factors into the non-stem daughter cell, leaving the new stem cell unexposed to cell damage. In this way, the new stem cell is protected and is able to maintain its regenerative capacity.

A barrier against aging?

Brain stem cells are able to preferentially shuttle damaged proteins into their non-stem cell progeny by a diffusion barrier called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER is a membrane structure in cells that has a number of important functions including deciding what factors or proteins end up in which cells.

The authors observed that during the division of brain stem cells, the ER forms a barrier between the non-stem and stem cell progeny that keeps the damaged proteins and aging factors in the non-stem daughter cell. This ER barrier remains intact during the division of young brain stem cells, however, they weren’t sure this was the case with older brain stem cells.

The scientists watched older brain stem cells to see if this anti-aging barrier was able to hold up with advancing age. They observed that this barrier actually weakens with age and allows aging factors to go with the stem cell progeny. This happens because an important cell structure called the nuclear lamina, which regulates cell division, doesn’t function properly in the old stem cells. When they disrupted the lamina structure in young brain stem cells, as expected, the anti-aging barrier couldn’t properly block the transfer of aging-factors into the new daughter stem cells.


Young brain stem cells on the left divide asymmetrically and have a barrier that keeps age-related damage in the non-stem daughter cell (red). This barrier weakens in older brain stem cells and aging factors are transferred to the stem cell progeny. (Moore et al., 2015)


Thus it seems that brain stem cells maintain their youth by generating diffusible barriers that block the transfer of damaged proteins and aging factors into their stem cell progeny during cell division. The strength of this barrier weakens with age, and when this happens, aging factors are more evenly divided between the non-stem and stem cell progeny, potentially causing stem cell damage and reducing their regenerative function.

Anti-aging implications

The authors note at the end of their report that further studies should be done to determine whether this anti-aging mechanism is unique to brain stem cells or if it occurs in other adult stem cells or cancer cells which display stem cell like properties. If similar anti-aging barriers exist, then targeting the age-related breakdown of this barrier could be a potential strategy to keep adult stem cells forever young and humans feeling and acting younger for a little longer.

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CIRM-funded team traces molecular basis for differences between human and chimp face

So similar yet so different
Whenever I go to the zoo, I could easily spend my entire visit hanging out with our not-so-distant relatives, the chimpanzees. To say we humans are similar to them is quite an understatement. Sharing 96% of our DNA, chimps are more closely related to us than they are to gorillas. And when you just compare our genes – that is, the segments of DNA that contain instructions for making proteins – we’re even more indistinguishable.

Chimps and Humans: So similar yet so different

Chimps and Humans: So similar yet so different

And yet you wouldn’t mistake a human for a chimp. I mean, I do have hairy arms, but they’re not that hairy. So what accounts for our very different appearance if our genes are so similar?

To seek out answers, a CIRM-funded team at Stanford University used both human and chimp induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to derive cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs). This cell type plays a key role in shaping the overall structure of the face during the early stages of embryo development. In a report published late last week in Cell, the team found differences, not in the genes themselves, but in gene activity between the human and chimp CNCCs.

Enhancers: Volume controls for your genes
Pinpointing the differences in gene activity relied on a comparative analysis of so-called enhancer regions of human and chimp DNA. Unlike genes, the enhancer regions of DNA do not provide instructions for making proteins. Instead they dictate how much protein to make by acting like volume control knobs for specific genes. A particular volume level, or gene activity, is determined by specific combinations of chemical tags and DNA-binding proteins on an enhancer region of DNA.

Enhancers: DNA segments that act like a volume control know for gene activity (Image source: xxxx)

Enhancers: DNA segments that act like a volume control knobs for gene activity (Image source: FANTOM Project, University of Copenhagen)

The researchers used several sophisticated lab techniques to capture a snapshot of this enhancer tagging and binding in the CNCCSs. They mostly saw similarities between human and chimp enhancers but, as senior author Joanna Wysocka explains in a Stanford University press release, they did uncover some differences:

“In particular, we found about 1,000 enhancer regions that are what we termed species-biased, meaning they are more active in one species or the other. Interestingly, many of the genes with species-biased enhancers and expression have been previously shown to be important in craniofacial development.”

PAX Humana: A genetic basis for our smaller jawline and snout?
For example, their analysis revealed that the genes PAX3 and PAX7 are associated with chimp-biased enhancer regions, and they had higher levels of activity in chimp CNCCs. These results get really intriguing once you learn a bit more about the PAX genes: other studies in mice have shown that mutations interfering with PAX function lead to mice with smaller, lower jawbones and snouts. So the lower level of PAX3/PAX7 gene activity in humans would appear to correlate with our smaller jaws and snout (mouth and nose) compared to chimps. Did that just blow your mind? How about this:

The researchers also found a variation in the enhancer region for the gene BMP4. But in this case, BMP4 was highly related to human-biased enhancer regions and had higher activity in humans compared to chimps. Previous mouse studies have shown that forcing higher levels of BMP4 specifically in CNCCs leads to shorter lower and upper jawbones, rounder skulls, and eyes positioned more to the front of the face. These changes caused by BMP4 sound an awful lot like the differences in human and chimp facial structures. It appears the Stanford group has established a terrific strategy for tracing the genetic basis for differences in humans and chimps.

So what’s next? According to Wysocka, the team is digging deeper into their data:

“We are now following up on some of these more interesting species-biased enhancers to better understand how they impact morphological differences. It’s becoming clear that these cellular pathways can be used in many ways to affect facial shape.”

And in the bigger picture, the researchers also suggest that this “cellular anthropology” approach could also be applied to a human to human search for DNA enhancer regions that play a role in the variation between healthy and disease states.

Brain Stem Cells in a Dish to the Rescue


Image credit:

The best way to impress your friends at the next party you attend might be to casually mention that scientists can grow miniature brain models in a dish using human stem cells. Sure, that might scare away some people, but when you explain how these tiny brain models can be used to study many different neurological diseases and could help identify new therapies to treat these diseases, your social status could sky rocket.

Recently, a group at UC San Diego used human stem cells to model a rare neurological disorder and identified a drug molecule that might be able to fix it. This work was funded in part by CIRM, and it was published today in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

The disorder is called MECP2 duplication syndrome. It’s caused by a duplication of the MECP2 gene located in the X chromosome, and is genetically inherited as an X-linked disorder, meaning the disease is much more common in males. Having extra copies of this gene causes a number of unfortunate symptoms including reduced muscle tone (hypotonia), intellectual disabilities, impaired speech, seizures, and developmental delays, to name a few. So far, treatments for this disorder only help ease the symptoms and do not cure the disease.

The group from UCSD decided to model this disease using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients with MECP2 duplication syndrome. iPSCs can form any cell type in the body, and the group used this to their advantage by coaxing the iPSCs into the specific type of nerve cell affected by the disorder. Their hard work was rewarded when they observed that the diseased nerve cells acted differently than normal nerve cells without the disease.

In fact, the diseased nerve cells generated more connections with other nearby nerve cells, and this altered their ability to talk to each other and perform their normal functions. The senior author Alysson Muotri described the difference as an “over-synchronization of the neuronal networks”, meaning that they were more active and tended to fire their signals in unison.

After establishing a relevant nerve cell model of MECP2 duplication disorder, the group tested out a library of drug molecules and identified a new drug candidate that was able to rescue the diseased nerve cells from their “over-synchronized” activity.

The senior author Alysson Muotri commented on the study in a press release:

Alysson Muotri (Photo by David Ahntholz)  

This work is encouraging for several reasons. First, this compound had never before been considered a therapeutic alternative for neurological disorders. Second, the speed in which we were able to do this. With mouse models, this work would likely have taken years and results would not necessarily be useful for humans.


The press release goes on to describe how Muotri and his team plan to push their preclinical studies using human stem-cell based models forward in hopes of entering clinical trials in the near future.


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What’s Fat Got to do With Alzheimer’s?


(Image credit:

Diets these days are a dime a dozen, and dietary trends come and go. First eggs were “out” because they contain cholesterol, but now they are back “in” because we now know that some types of cholesterol can be actually good for the body. Then there was the era of “fat-free” or “reduced-fat” foods. This was all the rage in the 90s until scientists realized that eliminating healthy fats from your diet can have negative consequences on your health.

The theories behind different diets evolve constantly much like the theories behind complicated neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Alzheimer’s is a debilitating disease that slowly robs patients of their minds, leaving them as shadows of their former selves. AD affects 47.5 million people globally with 7.7 million new patients diagnosed every year, thus making the disease one of the most important unmet medical needs to be addressed.

The causes of AD have eluded scientists for over a century. However, the main theory behind what causes AD involves the buildup of toxic proteins in the brain. These proteins accumulate to form structures called plaques and tangles that impair brain function and kill off brain cells.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for AD or treatments to stop its progression. This sobering fact is not due to a lack of effort by scientists and pharmaceutical companies. Dozens of drug therapies have or are being tested in clinical trials, many of them focusing on the removal of toxic protein levels in people with the disease. While there have been some pretty dramatic failures in these trials, a few are starting to show encouraging results.

Link Between Abnormal Fat Metabolism and Alzheimer’s Disease

Now, a new theory on AD involving the build up of toxic fat molecules in the brains of AD patients has been thrown into the mix. In a study published Thursday in Cell Stem Cell, scientists from Montreal reported the presence of fat droplets in AD patient brains in areas surrounding brain stem cells. Brain stem cells are responsible for growing new brain cells (such as nerves) and maintaining overall brain function and health. The scientists discovered that the fat droplets actually prevented the regenerative abilities of the brain stem cells, leading them to believe that the accumulation of fat droplets in the brain could be a cause of AD.

Fat is used as an energy source by cells and organs in the body in a process called “fatty acid metabolism”. Fat metabolism is very important for proper brain development but also in maintaining brain health and function in adults. Problems with fat metabolism in humans can cause diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. So one can imagine that problems with fat metabolism in the brain could also have serious consequences.

In this study, scientists used a genetic mouse model of AD that had a “triple-threat” of genetic mutations that cause AD in humans. They studied the brain stem cells in these mice and found that the support cells surrounding the stem cells were full of fat droplets. They also noticed that when the fat droplets were present, the brain stem cells were not dividing to generate new brain cells (which is a common defect associated with AD). When they looked at brain tissue from nine AD patients, they also observed a similar pattern of an increased concentration of fat droplets surrounding areas of brain stem cells compared to healthy human brain tissue.

fat droplets

AD patient brains (lower panel) have more fat droplets shown in red than normal healthy brains (upper panel). (Hamilton et al., 2015)

Using a fancy science technique called mass spectrometry, the scientists found that the fat droplets were made up of a fat triglyceride called oleic acid, which is a common component of vegetable and animal fats. To prove that oleic acid was bad for brain stem cells, they took normal healthy mice and injected oleic acid into their brains. They observed that adding this fat negatively affected the stem cells’ regenerative ability to divide. Going one step further, the scientists used drugs to block the formation of oleic acid in their AD mouse model, and saw that removing this fat allowed the brain stem cells to divide and function properly.

The major conclusions generated from this study were summarized nicely by senior author Karl Fernandes in a news release:

We discovered that these fatty acids are produced by the brain, that they build up slowly with normal aging, but that the process is accelerated significantly in the presence of genes that predispose to Alzheimer’s disease. In mice predisposed to the disease, we showed that these fatty acids accumulate very early on, at two months of age, which corresponds to the early twenties in humans. Therefore, we think that the build-up of fatty acids is not a consequence but rather a cause or accelerator of the disease.


Don’t Count Your Chickens Just Yet

While this study suggests that fat accumulation in the brain is a cause of AD, more research will need to be done to confirm that abnormal fat metabolism is the culprit. Some experiments can be done quickly such as treating their AD mouse model with the drugs that block the formation of the “bad fat” and monitoring them for an extended time period to see if blocking oleic acid accumulation prevents the onset of AD symptoms like memory loss. Other experiments, such as therapeutically targeting abnormal brain fat deposits in human, will be more long term projects with unknown results.


Dr. Alois Alzheimer

Nontheless, this study nicely ties back to an observation by Dr. Alois Alzheimer who first reported about AD in 1906 . When he dissected the brains of AD patients who had passed away, he found five major pathologies that distinguished their brains from healthy brains. One of these traits was an increased concentration of fat droplets. Thus findings from Fernandes and his group revive a century old notion that fat metabolism could be a cause of AD and open doors for the development of new therapeutic strategies to fight AD.

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Boo-Boos and Stem Cells: New Children’s Book Explains Body’s Healing Process

With two boys under six, scraped elbows and knees are a common sight in my household. After the crying and tears subside, the excitement of deciding between the Captain America or the Lightning McQueen band aid soon follows.

The fun part of getting a boo-boo: choosing bandaids

The fun part of getting a boo-boo: choosing bandaids

Over those next several days, my boys get a thrill out of peeking at their boo-boos as they gradually heal. And I get giddy about using their minor injuries as an excuse to tell them about the amazing role stem cells play in helping the body heal. But have you ever tried to discuss the cellular and molecular processes of wound healing and tissue regeneration to little kids? It’s a bit tricky to say the least.

Fortunately, a new resource has come to my rescue. Carlo and the Orange Glasses is an imaginative children’s picture book about a boy who gets a cut on his leg and, with the help of his older sister, learns how his body repairs itself. In the story, Carlo uses a magical pair of glasses, the Zoom3000, that lets him witness his stem cells in action as they help mend his skin. You can read the interactive online book here:

Vanessa de Mello, a PhD student at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, wrote and illustrated the book during an internship at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine (MRC) also in Scotland. The MRC currently hosts Carlo and the Orange Glasses on EuroStemCell, a fabulous website and program whose mission is “to help European citizens make sense of stem cells.”

In a post last week on the EuroStemCell website, de Mello explained her goal for the book:

Vanessa De Mello

Vanessa De Mello

“The book itself is intended for children around the ages of 8-10. Carlo and the Orange Glasses gives an overview of wound healing, definitions of cells, tissues and stem cells in an imaginative way. I hope for the book to be fun, easy to read and pull more young minds into science.”

I put the book to the test by reading it to my almost six-year-old. He really liked the colorful drawings and when I asked him what the book meant to him, he said:

Ezra_StemCellBook-0669 copy

Carlo and the Orange Glasses helped my
5 year old son, Ezra, learn about stem cells.

“Stem cells are the most important cells in your body because they fix
your boo-boos and help you to grow.”

Based on that response, I’d say Vanessa’s book is a smashing success!

I think making this complex scientific concept accessible and entertaining for very young kids is so important. It helps instill an appreciation for science that they’ll carry on to adulthood. Who knows how many will eventually go on to careers in regenerative medicine and stem cell science. But they all have the potential to become stem cell ambassadors to ensure this field fulfills its promise to bring treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

Throwback Thursday: Progress to a Cure for ALS

Welcome to our new “Throwback Thursday” (TBT) series. CIRM’s Stem Cellar blog has a rich archive of stem cell content that is too valuable to let dust bunnies take over.  So we decided to brush off some of our older, juicy stories and see what advancements in stem cell research science have been made since!

ALS is also called Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the famous American baseball player.

ALS is also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, named after the famous American baseball player.

This week, we’ll discuss an aggressive neurodegenerative disease called Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or ALS. You’re probably more familiar with its other name, Lou Gehrig’s disease. Gehrig was a famous American Major League baseball player who took the New York Yankees to six world championships. He had a gloriously successful career that was sadly cut short by ALS. Post diagnosis, Gehrig’s physical performance quickly deteriorated, and he had to retire from a sport for which he was considered an American hero. He passed away only a year later, at the young age of 37, after he succumbed to complications caused by ALS.

A year ago, we published an interesting blog on this topic. Let’s turn back the clock and take a look at what happened in ALS research in 2014.

TBT: Disease in a Dish – Using Human Stem Cells to Find ALS Treatments

This blog featured the first of our scintillating “Stem Cells in Your face” video series called “Treating ALS with a Disease in a Dish.” Here is an excerpt:

Our latest video Disease in a Dish: That’s a Mouthful takes a lighthearted approach to help clear up any head scratching over this phrase. Although it’s injected with humor, the video focuses on a dreadful disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, it’s a disorder in which nerve cells that control muscle movement die. There are no effective treatments and it’s always fatal, usually within 3 to 5 years after diagnosis.

To explain disease in a dish, the video summarizes a Science Translation Medicine publication of CIRM-funded research reported by the laboratory of Robert Baloh, M.D., Ph.D., director of Cedars-Sinai’s multidisciplinary ALS Program. In the study, skin cells from patients with an inherited form of ALS were used to create nerve cells in a petri dish that exhibit the same genetic defects found in the neurons of ALS patients. With this disease in a dish, the team identified a possible cause of the disease: the cells overproduce molecules causing a toxic buildup that affects neuron function. The researchers devised a way to block the toxic buildup, which may point to a new therapeutic strategy.

New Stem Cell Discoveries in ALS Make Progress to Finding a Cure

So what’s happened in the field of ALS research in the past year? I’m happy to report that a lot has been accomplished to better understand this disease and to develop potential cures! Here are a few highlights that we felt were worth mentioning:

  • The Ice Bucket Challenge launched by the ALS Association is raising awareness and funds for ALS research.

    The Ice Bucket Challenge launched by the ALS Association is raising awareness and funds for ALS research.

    Ice Bucket Challenge. The ALS Association launched the “world’s largest global social media phenomenon” by encouraging brave individuals to dump ice-cold water on their heads to raise awareness and funds for research into treatments and cures for ALS. This August, the ALS Association re-launched the Ice Bucket Challenge campaign in efforts to raise additional funds and to make this an annual event.

  • ALS Gene Mapping. In a story released yesterday, the global biotech company Biogen is partnering with Columbia University Medical Center to map ALS disease genes. An article from Bloomberg Business describes how using Ice Bucket Money to create “a genetic map of the disease may help reveal the secrets of a disorder that’s not well understood, including how much a person’s genes contribute to the likelihood of developing ALS.” Biogen is also launching a clinical trial for a new ALS drug candidate by the end of the year.
  • New Drug target for ALS. Our next door neighbors at the Gladstone Institutes here in San Francisco published an exciting new finding in the journal PNAS in June. In collaboration with scientists at the University of Michigan, they discovered a new therapeutic target for ALS. They found that a protein called hUPF1 was able to protect brain cells from ALS-induced death by preventing the accumulation of toxic proteins in these cells. In a Gladstone press release, senior author Steve Finkbeiner said, “This is the first time we’ve been able to link this natural monitoring system to neurodegenerative disease. Leveraging this system could be a strategic therapeutic target for diseases like ALS and frontotemporal dementia.”
  • Stem cells, ALS, and clinical trials. Clive Svendsen at Cedars-Sinai is using gene therapy and stem cells to develop a cure for ALS. His team is currently working in mice to determine the safety and effectiveness of the treatment, but they hope to move into clinical trials with humans by the end of the year. For more details, check out our blog Genes + Cells: Stem Cells deliver genes as drugs and hope for ALS.

These are only a few of the exciting and promising stories that have come out in the past year. It’s encouraging and comforting to see, however, that progress towards a cure for ALS is definitely moving forward.

Researchers cool to idea of ice bath after exercise

Have you ever had a great workout, really pushed your body and muscles hard and thought “You know what would be good right now? A nice plunge into an ice bath.”

No. Me neither.

Weightlifter Karyn Marshall taking an ice bath: Photo courtesy Karyn Marshall

Weightlifter Karyn Marshall taking an ice bath: Photo courtesy Karyn Marshall

But some people apparently believe that taking an ice bath after a hard workout can help their muscles rebound and get stronger.

It’s a mistaken belief, at least according to a new study from researchers at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and the University of Queensland (UQ) in Australia. They are – pardon the pun – giving the cold shoulder to the idea that an ice bath can help hot muscles recover after a hard session of strength training.

The researchers got 21 men who exercise a lot to do strength training twice a week for 12 weeks. One group then agreed – and I’d love to know how they persuaded them to do this – to end the training session by jumping into a 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 Celsius) ice bath. The other group – let’s label them the “sensible brigade” – ended by doing their cool down on an exercise bike.

Happily for the rest of us at the end of the 12 weeks the “sensible brigade” experienced more gains in muscle strength and muscle mass than the cool kids.

So what does this have to do with stem cells? Well the researchers say the reason for this result is because our bodies use so-called satellite cells – which are a kind of muscle stem cell – to help build stronger muscles. When you plunge those muscles into a cold bath you effectively blunt or block the ability of the muscle stem cells to work as well as they normally would.

But the researchers weren’t satisfied just putting that particular theory on ice, so in a second study they took muscle biopsies from men after they had done leg-strengthening exercises. Again, half did an active cool down, the others jumped in the ice bath.

In a news release accompanying the article in the The Journal of Physiology, Dr Llion Roberts, from UQ’s School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, said the results were the same:

“We found that cold water immersion after training substantially attenuated, or reduced, long-term gains in muscle mass and strength. It is anticipated that athletes who use ice baths after workouts would see less long-term muscle gains than those who choose an active warm down.”

The bottom line; if you strain a muscle working out ice is your friend because it’s great for reducing inflammation. If you want to build stronger muscles ice is not your friend. Save it for that nice refreshing beverage you have earned after the workout.


Da Mayor and the clinical trial that could help save his vision

Former San Francisco Mayor and California State Assembly Speaker Willie Brown is many things, but shy is not one of them. A profile of him in the San Francisco Chronicle once described him as “Brash, smart, confident”. But for years Da Mayor – as he is fondly known in The City – said very little about a condition that is slowly destroying his vision. Mayor Brown has retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

RP is a degenerative disease that slowly destroys a person’s sight vision by attacking and destroying photoreceptors in the retina, the light-sensitive area at the back of the eye that is critical for vision. At a recent conference held by the Everylife Foundation for Rare Diseases, Mayor Brown gave the keynote speech and talked about his life with RP.

Willie Brown

He described how people thought he was being rude because he would walk by them on the streets and not say hello. The truth is, he couldn’t see them.

He was famous for driving fancy cars like Bentleys, Maseratis and Ferraris. When he stopped doing that, he said, “people thought I was broke because I no longer had expensive cars.” The truth is his vision was too poor for him to drive.

Despite its impact on his life RP hasn’t slowed Da Mayor down, but now there’s a new clinical trial underway that might help him, and others like him, regain some of that lost vision.

The trial is the work of Dr. Henry Klassen at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Dr. Klassen just announced the treatment of their first four patients, giving them stem cells that hopefully will slow down or even reverse the progression of RP.

“We are delighted to be moving into the clinic after many years of bench research,” Klassen said in a news release.

The patients were each given a single injection of retinal progenitor cells. It’s hoped these cells will help protect the photoreceptors in the retina that have not yet been damaged by RP, and even revive those that have become impaired but not yet destroyed by the disease.

The trial will enroll 16 patients in this Phase 1 trial. They will all get a single injection of retinal cells into the eye most affected by the disease. After that, they’ll be followed for 12 months to make sure that the therapy is safe and to see if it has any beneficial effects on vision in the treated eye, compared to the untreated one.

In a news release Jonathan Thomas, Ph.D., J.D., Chair of the CIRM Board said it’s always exciting when a therapy moves out of the lab and into people:

“This is an important step for Dr. Klassen and his team, and hopefully an even more important one for people battling this devastating disease. Our mission at CIRM is to accelerate the development of stem cell therapies for patients with unmet medical needs, and this certainly fits that bill. That’s why we have invested almost $19 million in helping this therapy reach this point.”

RP hasn’t defeated Da Mayor. Willie Brown is still known as a sharp dresser and an even sharper political mind. His message to the people at the Everylife Foundation conference was, “never give up, keep striving, keep pushing, keep hoping.”

To learn more about the study or to enroll contact the UCI Alpha Stem Cell Clinic at 949-824-3990 or by email at

And visit our website to watch a presentation about the trial (link) by Dr. Klassen and to hear brief remarks from one of his patients.