One man’s story points to hope against a deadly skin cancer

One of the great privileges and pleasures of working at the stem cell agency is the chance to meet and work with some remarkable people, such as my colleagues here at CIRM and the researchers we support. But for me the most humbling, and by far the most rewarding experience, is having a chance to get to know the people we work for, the patients and patient advocates.

Norm Beegun, got stem cell therapy for metastatic melanoma

Norm Beegun, got stem cell therapy for metastatic melanoma

At our May Board meeting I got to meet a gentleman who exemplifies everything that I truly admire about the patients and patient advocates. His name is Norm Beegun. And this is his story.

Norm lives in Los Angeles. In 2002 he went to see his regular doctor, an old high school friend, who suggested that since it had been almost ten years since he’d had a chest x-ray it might be a good idea to get one. At first Norm was reluctant. He felt fine, was having no health problems and didn’t see the need. But his friend persisted and so Norm agreed. It was a decision that changed, and ultimately saved, his life.

The x-ray showed a spot on his lung. More tests were done. They confirmed it was cancer; stage IV melanoma. They did a range of other examinations to see if they could spot any signs of the cancer on his skin, any potential warnings signs that they had missed. They found nothing.

Norm underwent surgery to remove the tumor. He also tried several other approaches to destroy the cancer. None of them worked; each time the cancer returned; each time to a different location.

Then a nurse who was working with him on these treatments suggested he see someone named Dr. Robert Dillman, who was working on a new approach to treating metastatic melanoma, one involving cancer stem cells.

Norm got in touch with Dr. Dillman and learned what the treatment involved; he was intrigued and signed up. They took some cells from Norm’s tumor and processed them, turning them into a vaccine, a kind of personalized therapy that would hopefully work with Norm’s own immune system to destroy the cancer.

That was in 2004. Once a month for the next six months he was given injections of the vaccine. Unlike the other therapies he had tried this one had no side effects, no discomfort, no pain or problems. All it did was get rid of the cancer. Regular scans since then have shown no sign that the melanoma has returned. Theoretically that could be because the new therapy destroyed the standard tumor cells as well as the cancer stem cells that lead to recurrence.

Norm says when you are diagnosed with an incurable life-threatening disease, one with a 5-year survival rate of only around 15%, you will try anything; so he said it wasn’t a hard decision to take part in the clinical trial, he felt he had nothing to lose.

“I didn’t know if it would help me. I didn’t think I’d be cured. But I wanted to be a guinea pig and perhaps help others.”

When he was diagnosed his son had just won a scholarship to play football at the University of California, Berkeley. Norm says he feared he would never be able to see his son play. But thanks to cleverly scheduling surgery during the off-season and having a stem cell therapy that worked he not only saw his son play, he never missed a game.

Norm returned to Berkeley on May 21st, 2015. He came to address the CIRM Board in support of an application by a company called NeoStem (which has just changed its name to Caladrius Biosciences). This was the company that had developed the cell therapy for metastatic melanoma that Norm took.

“Talking about this is still very emotional. When I got up to talk to the CIRM Board about this therapy, and ask them to support it, I wanted to let them know my story, the story of someone who had their life saved by this treatment. Because of this I am here today. Because of this I was able to see my son play. But just talking about it left me close to tears.”

It left many others in the room close to tears as well. The CIRM Board voted to fund the NeoStem application, investing $17.7 million to help the company carry out a Phase 3 clinical trial, the last hurdle it needs to clear to prove to the Food and Drug Administration that this should be approved for use in metastatic melanoma.

Norm says he is so grateful for the extra years he has had, and he is always willing to try and support others going through what he did:

“I counsel other people diagnosed with metastatic melanoma. I feel that I want to help others, to give them a sense of hope. It is such a wonderful feeling, being able to show other people that you can survive this disease.”

When you get to meet people like Norm, how could you not love this job.

Faster, better, more efficient. Challenging? That too. An update on CIRM 2.0.

Changing direction is never easy. The greater the change the greater the likelihood you’ll have to make adjustments and do some fine-tuning along the way to make sure you get it right.

On January 1st of this year we made a big change, launching CIRM 2.0. Our President and CEO Dr. C. Randal Mills called it “a radical overhaul of the way the Agency does business.” This new approach puts the emphasis on patients, partnerships and speed and cuts down the time from application to funding of clinical-stage projects from around two years to just 120 days.

You can read more about 2.0 here.

So, several months into the program how are we doing?

Clinical stage of CIRM 2.0 has three programs

Clinical stage of CIRM 2.0 has three programs

Well, since January 1st we have had three application tracks under 2.0 that reflect our goal of accelerating therapies to patients with unmet medical needs. These focus on late stage work to either get a promising therapy into a clinical trial, to carry out a clinical trial, or to help a promising project move even faster.

Under those three programs we have had 12 applications for funding, for a total request of $111 million. With application deadlines the last business day of each month two of those were in January, two in February, three more in March and five in April.

As Dr. Mills told our governing Board when they met last week, that number is more than we were expecting:

 “When we started the program we calculated there’d be around one or two applications a month, not five. I don’t think having five applications a month is sustainable, but that’s probably just the backlog, the pent up demand for funding, working its way through the system. For now we can cope with that volume.”

Interestingly eight of those applications were for funding for clinical trials:

  • Two for Phase 1
  • One for Phase 2
  • Five for Phase 3

Last week our Board approved one of those Phase 3 trials (the last big hurdle to clear before the Food and Drug Administration will consider approving it for wider use), investing almost $18 million in NeoStem’s therapy for one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer, metastatic melanoma.

This is the first time we have ever funded a Phase 3 trial. So, quite a milestone for us. But it may well not be the last one. The Board also approved a project to conduct the late preclinical work needed to apply to conduct a trial in retinitis pigmentosa.

Dr. Mills said there are two clear patterns so far:

“We are getting a more mature portfolio of clinical stage programs for adjudication. We are also starting to see requests for accelerating activities, where we have made previous awards to researchers who now have identified new ways to accelerate that work and they are turning to us for help in doing that.”

Of the 12 applications received we have screened all of them within the 7-day target window to make sure they meet funding criteria. Some have been ruled out for not being within the scope of the award program. The accepted applications have all had budget reviews and been sent on for expert analysis within the slated time frames.

We had a couple of hiccups with our first review but that resulted from on-line technology and getting everyone comfortable with the new rules we were bringing in. The second review resulted in the first two awards by our Board last week, and the third review occurred yesterday.

“The bottom line is things are moving through and things are being weeded out. In March we had two clinical stage applications and one add-on funding application but that one add-on failed in screening. So, in general CIRM 2.0 is being well utilized. There’s no question we are significantly reducing application time from application to funding, attracting later stage applications. Clearly this has not been without its challenges but the team is doing a great job of managing everything.”

And remember this is only the first part of CIRM 2.0. We have two other programs, for Discovery or basic research and Translational research, that are being developed and we plan on rolling those out later this summer.

Stay tuned for more details on those programs.

How venture capital became a capital adventure for stem cell agency’s newest Board member

Kathy LaPorte, the newest member of the CIRM Board

Kathy LaPorte, the newest member of the CIRM Board

There’s something fascinating about looking at the arc of a person’s career. So often we start out thinking we are going to be one thing, and over the years we move in a different direction and end up doing something else entirely.

That’s certainly the case with Kathy LaPorte, the newest addition to our governing Board, the Independent Citizens Oversight Committee (ICOC).

Ms. Laporte started out with dreams of being a doctor and, after getting a biology degree at Yale University, she applied to go to medical school at both Stanford and Harvard (she was accepted at both, which tells you something about her ability). But somewhere along the way she realized that being a doctor was not for her and so she started thinking about other directions. The one she ultimately chose was business.

And she went about it in style. After gaining experience with a number of firms she teamed up with some colleagues to start New Leaf Venture Partners, a venture capital firm based in Silicon Valley.

A profile of her in the Silicon Valley Business Journal described her as “smart, thorough and solution-oriented, Ms. LaPorte has spent nearly her entire professional life in venture capital — something of a rarity — and is considered a quick study by those who have worked with her.”

But it’s not just her business acumen that earned her the respect of colleagues and an appointment to our Board by State Treasurer Bill Lockyer. It’s also her experience working in the biotech and healthcare field, evaluating and mentoring later stage biotech companies and early stage medical device and diagnostic companies.

“I’m honored to be joining the Board, and excited about CIRM’s mission to bring new regenerative medicine therapies to patients with chronic diseases,” says Ms. LaPorte. “I hope my experience from 28 years of helping to finance and guide the work of passionate scientists and entrepreneurs, enabling their ideas to get to the people who really need them, will be helpful to the CIRM team.”

In a news release announcing the news, Jonathan Thomas, the Chair of our Board, said:

“We are thrilled to have Kathy join us on the ICOC. As a representative of a life science commercial entity she brings with her a wealth of knowledge and expertise in biotech and business development for healthcare companies and products. Her keen intellect and analytical skills are going to be terrific assets for the Board.”

Ms. LaPorte’s career took a few twists and turns before it led to us, but we’re delighted it brought her here, and we welcome her to the Board.

October ICOC Board Meeting to Begin Soon

The October ICOC Board Meeting begins this morning in Los Angeles, CA.

The complete agenda can be found here, including a special Spotlight on Disease focusing on Retinitis Pigmentosa.

For those not able to attend, you are welcome to dial in!

Dial in Information

WebEx Link

Go to
Click “Join Now”

Dial in:
(877) 260-8898

Confirmation Number:

Audio Cast:

Meeting Number(s): 5114686455


We will be providing a summary of today’s highlights after the meeting—so stay tuned!

CIRM 2.0: How to Build a Better Stem Cell Agency and Speed up Treatments to Patients

Change is never easy. We all get used to doing things in a certain way and it can sometimes be difficult to realize that the way we have chosen, while it may have worked well at one time is perhaps not the best way to achieve our goals at this time. Well, change is coming to the stem cell agency.


It’s not surprising that our new President & CEO, C. Randal Mills, Ph.D., would want to introduce some of his own ideas about how best to run the agency in the current moment of stem cell science. After all, it’s those ideas that landed him the job in the first place. Now Randy wants us to develop a clearer focus, one that is more aligned with his 4-point criteria for assessing everything we do.

  1. Will it speed up treatments to patients
  2. Will it increase the likelihood of successful treatments for patients
  3. Does it target an unmet medical need
  4. Is it efficient.

That new focus begins with re-imagining how we can be most effective in the way we fund research. Right now we put out what’s called an RFA or Request for Application, telling people who have promising projects in a particular area of stem cell research to submit an application and if they are successful they’ll get up to $20 million, depending on the kind of project.

The problem is, we often have long gaps between each round of funding and so a company or institution with a promising therapy will sometimes have to wait as much as a couple of years before they can apply again. If they do wait and are successful in their application it could still be another year or two before they are able to gain actual funding and begin a clinical trial. But when lives are at stake, you can’t afford to wait that long. So we’re looking at ways of speeding things up, making it easier for the best science to get the funds needed when they are needed.

At our Board meeting yesterday Randy outlined some broad concepts about what he wants to do and how it can be done. It’s part of his vision for the agency, a new focus that he is calling CIRM 2.0 (with acknowledgments to Dr. Paul Knoepfler who coined the term earlier this year)

As with any simple idea it’s really complicated. We need to achieve greater speed, to streamline the way we do things, without sacrificing the quality of the review process because we need to ensure that we only fund the best science.

In the months to come, as the precise details about these proposed changes are fine tuned, the Board will hear in greater detail how this will work and, as always, it will be up to them to decide if they think it’s a good idea.

Either way it will start a conversation about how we can become more efficient and more effective at living up to our mission, of accelerating therapies that target patients with unmet medical needs. And that always has to be a good thing.

For more details about the other big events at yesterday’s Board meeting, including awarding $16 million to ViaCyte to help it advance its promising therapy for type 1 diabetes, you can read the news release posted on our website.

September ICOC Boarding Meeting Begins Soon

The September ICOC Boarding Meeting begins this morning in Berkeley, CA.

The complete agenda can be found here, including a special Spotlight on Disease focusing on Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

For those not able to attend, feel free to dial in:

Dial in Infomation:

United States: (800) 230-1093
Access Code: 334835

* Meeting Number(s): 5114686455

1. Go to…
2. Click “Join Now”.

We will be providing a summary of the meeting’s highlights after the meeting—so stay tuned!

July ICOC Board Meeting Now Beginning

The July ICOC Boarding Meeting is now beginning in San Francisco.

The complete agenda can be found here.

For those not able to attend, feel free to dial in:

Dial In (800) 230-1085
Confirmation Number: 331407

Audio Cast:
Web Meeting Address:
* Meeting Number(s): (511)468-6455
* HOST CODE: 697745

WebEx Link:
Go to
Click “Join Now”.

We will be providing a summary of the meeting’s highlights after the meeting—so stay tuned!